September 20, 2018

Launch Log

This listing shows the completed space launches from spaceports around the globe in 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. For earlier missions, see pages listing launches from 2004 through 2008, from 2009 through 2011, and from 2012 through 2014.

2018

Sept. 15Delta 2 • ICESat 2
Launch time: 1302 GMT (9:02 a.m. EDT; 6:02 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-2W, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket launched NASA’s ICESat 2 satellite to continue the important observations of ice-sheet elevation change, sea-ice freeboard, and vegetation canopy height begun by ICESat in 2003. The rocket flew in the 7420 configuration with four solid rocket boosters and no third stage. This was the final launch of a Delta 2 rocket. Delayed from Sept. 12. Read our full story. [Sept. 15]
Sept. 10Falcon 9 • Telstar 18 VANTAGE
Launch window: 0445 GMT (12:45 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Telstar 18 VANTAGE communications satellite for Telesat. The Telstar 18 VANTAGE satellite will provide broadcast, enterprise and government communications services over parts of India, China, Mongolia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Ocean region. APT Satellite of Hong Kong has an agreement to use capacity on Telstar 18V, which is also known as Apstar 5C. The satellite was built SSL. Delayed from July, Aug. 17, Aug. 23 and Aug. 25. Moved forward from Sept. 9. Delayed from Sept. 8. Read our full story. [Sept. 10]
Sept. 6/7Long March 2C • Haiyang 1C
Launch window: 0315 GMT on 7th (11:15 p.m. on 6th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket will launch the Haiyang 1C ocean observation satellite. Read our full story. [Sept. 7]
Aug. 24, 2018Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 2352 GMT (7:52 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket with a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network into Medium Earth Orbit. Read our full story. [Aug. 24]
Aug. 22, 2018Vega • Aeolus
Launch time: 2120:09 GMT (5:20:09 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV12, launched with the Aeolus satellite for the European Space Agency. Aeolus will be the first ever satellite to deliver wind profiles on a global scale and on a daily basis. Delayed from November, Jan. 20 and mid-2018. Delayed from Aug. 21 to wait for improved wind conditions. Read our full story. [Aug. 22]
Aug. 12, 2018Delta 4-Heavy • Parker Solar Probe
Launch time: 0731 GMT (3:31 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket launched NASA’s Parker Solar Probe. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. The Parker Solar Probe is the first-ever mission to “touch” the sun. The spacecraft, about the size of a small car, will travel directly into the sun’s atmosphere about 4 million miles from our star’s surface. Delayed from July 31 and Aug. 4. Scrubbed on Aug. 11. Read our full story. [Aug. 12]
Aug. 7, 2018Falcon 9 • Merah Putih
Launch time: 0518 GMT (1:18 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Merah Putih communications satellite for Telkom Indonesia. Merah Putih, previously known as Telkom 4, will provide C-band telecommunications services over Indonesia and India, replacing the failed Telkom 1 communications craft. The Merah Putih satellite was built by Space Systems/Loral. The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage. Delayed from Aug. 2 and Aug. 4. Read our full story. [Aug. 7]
July 30/31, 2018Long March 4B • Gaofen 11
Launch time: 0300 GMT on 31st (11:00 p.m. EDT on 30th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched the Gaofen 11 Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [July 29]
July 28/29, 2018Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 0148 GMT on 29th (9:48 p.m. EDT on 28th)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket with a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network into Medium Earth Orbit. Read our full story. [July 29]
July 25, 2018Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 56-65
Launch time: 1139:30 GMT (7:39:30 a.m. EDT; 4:39:30 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from July 20. Read our full story. [July 25]
July 25, 2018Ariane 5 • Galileo 23-26
Launch time: 1125:01 GMT (7:25:01 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ES rocket, designated VA244, to launch four Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. Read our full story. [July 25]
July 22, 2018Falcon 9 • Telstar 19 VANTAGE
Launch time: 0550 GMT (1:50 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Telstar 19 VANTAGE communications satellite for Telesat. The Telstar 19 VANTAGE satellite will provide high-throughput Ku-band and Ka-band communications services, supporting broadband applications over South America, the Caribbean, the North Atlantic and Canada. The satellite was built SSL. Delayed from June, July 19 and July 21. Read our full story. [July 22]
July 9, 2018Soyuz • Progress 70P
Launch time: 2151:34 GMT (5:51:34 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 70th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from April 15. Moved up from June 27. Delayed from June 13. Read our full story. [July 9]
July 9, 2018Long March 3A • Beidou
Launch time: 2058 GMT (4:58 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3A rocket launched a satellite for the country’s Beidou navigation network into an inclined geostationary transfer orbit. Read our full story. [July 9]
July 8/9, 2018Long March 2C • PRSS 1
Launch time: 0356 GMT on 9th (11:56 p.m. EDT on 8th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched the Pakistan Remote Sensing Satellite, or PRSS 1, for SUPARCO, Pakistan’s national space agency. The PakTES 1A remote sensing satellite, developed in partnership by Pakistan and South Africa, also launched on this mission. Delayed from June. Read our full story. [July 9]
June 29, 2018Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 15
Launch time: 0942:42 GMT (5:42:42 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 17th mission of a Dragon spacecraft on SpaceX’s 15th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight was conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. This mission used a previously-flown first stage booster and a reused Dragon capsule. Delayed from June 6, June 9 and June 28. Read our full story. [June 29]
June 26/27, 2018Long March 2C • XJSW-A and B
Launch time: 0330 GMT on 27th (11:30 p.m. EDT on 26th)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched two spacecraft two test inter-satellite network links and Earth observation technology. Read our full story. [June 27]
June 16, 2018Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 2146 GMT (5:46 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz 2-1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Read our full story. [June 16]
June 12, 2018H-2A • IGS Radar 6
Launch time: 0420 GMT (12:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched an Information Gathering Satellite with a radar reconnaissance payload for the Japanese government. Delayed from June 11. Read our full story. [June 12]
June 6, 2018Soyuz • ISS 55S
Launch time: 1112:39 GMT (7:12:39 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Moved forward from April 27. Delayed from April 25. Read our full story. [June 6]
June 5, 2018Long March 3A • Fengyun 2H
Launch time: 1307 GMT (9:07 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3A rocket launched the Fengyun 2H geostationary weather satellite. Read our full story. [June 5]
June 4, 2018Falcon 9 • SES 12
Launch time: 0445 GMT (12:45 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the SES 12 communications satellite for SES of Luxembourg. The SES 12 satellite will provide direct-to-home broadcast and other high-throughput communications services in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, including rapidly growing markets such as India and Indonesia. The satellite was built by Airbus Defense and Space. The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage. Delayed from February, April 30, May 24, May 31 and June 1. Read our full story. [June 4]
June 2, 2018Long March 2D • Gaofen 6
Launch time: 0413 GMT (12:13 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Gaofen 6 Earth observation satellite and the experimental Luojia 1 remote sensing payload. Read our full story. [June 2]
May 22, 2018Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 51-55 & GRACE Follow-On
Launch time: 1947:58 GMT (3:47:58 p.m. EDT; 12:47:58 p.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched five satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet and two Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE Follow-On) satellites for NASA and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage. Delayed from March 21, April 14, April 28, May 10, May 19 and May 21. Read our full story. [May 22]
May 21, 2018Antares • OA-9
Launch window: 0844:06 GMT (4:44:06 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
An Orbital ATK Antares rocket launched the 10th Cygnus cargo freighter on the ninth operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-9. The rocket flew in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from March, May 1, May 9 and May 20. Read our full story. [May 21]
May 20, 2018Long March 4C • Chang’e 4 Relay
Launch time: 2128 GMT (5:28 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched a relay satellite toward the Earth-moon L2 Lagrange point to enable communications between Earth and the Chang’e 4 lunar lander and rover on the far side of the moon. Two Chinese microsatellites launched with the Chang’e 4 relay mission to conduct astronomical observations from deep space. Read our full story. [May 20]
May 11, 2018Falcon 9 • Bangabandhu 1
Launch time: 2014 GMT (4:14 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Bangabandhu 1 communications satellite for the Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission. The spacecraft will provide broadcasting and telecommunication services to rural areas and introduce direct-to-home television programming across Bangladesh and neighboring countries. The Bangabandhu 1 satellite was built by Thales Alenia Space. This was the first launch of the upgraded Block 5 version of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket. The first stage was recovered on a drone ship at sea. Delayed from December, February, April 5, April 24, May 4 and May 7. Scrubbed on May 10. Read our full story. [May 11]
May 8, 2018Long March 4C • Gaofen 5
Launch time: 1828 GMT (2:28 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched the Gaofen 5 hyperspectral Earth-imaging satellite. Delayed from May 2. Read our full story. [May 5]
May 5, 2018Atlas 5 • InSight
Launch time: 1105 GMT (7:05 a.m. EDT; 4:05 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-078, launched NASA’s InSight lander to Mars. InSight will touch down in the Elysium Planitia region of Mars in November 2018 to study the Martian interior and search for ongoing seismic activity. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March 2016. Read our full story. [May 5]
May 3, 2018Long March 3B • Apstar 6C
Launch time: 1606 GMT (12:06 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Apstar 6C communications satellite. Apstar 6C will provide commercial video and direct-to-home broadcast, VSAT connectivity, cellular backhaul and mobile broadband services over the Asia-Pacific region for APT Satellite. Delayed from March 15 and April 21. Read our full story. [May 3]
April 26, 2018Long March 11 • Zhuhai 1
Launch time: 0442 GMT (12:42 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 11 rocket launched five Zhuhai 1 remote sensing satellites for a commercial constellation of Earth-imaging craft for Zhuhai Orbita Aerospace Science and Technology Co. Read our full story. [April 26]
April 25, 2018Rockot • Sentinel 3B
Launch time: 1757:51 GMT (1:57:51 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Eurockot Rockot vehicle launched with the Sentinel 3B Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 3B carries instruments to measure sea surface topography, sea and land surface temperature, and ocean and land color. Delayed from mid-2017 and November. Delayed from March and April 6. Read our full story. [April 25]
April 18, 2018Falcon 9 • TESS
Launch time: 2251:30 GMT (6:51:30 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). The TESS mission will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, orbiting a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. The principal goal of the TESS mission is to detect small planets with bright host stars in the solar neighborhood, so that detailed characterizations of the planets and their atmospheres can be performed. TESS will be stationed in a high-Earth elliptical orbit. Delayed from March 20. Delayed from April 16. Read our full story. [April 18]
April 18, 2018Proton • Blagovest No. 12L
Launch time: 2212 GMT (6:12 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage launched the Blagovest No. 12L communications satellite to cover Russian territory and provide high-speed Internet, television and radio broadcast, and voice and video conferencing services for Russian domestic and military users. Delayed from Dec. 25, February, March 22 and April 4. Moved forward from April 22. Read our full story. [April 18]
April 14, 2018Atlas 5 • AFSPC 11
Launch period: 2313 GMT (7:13 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-079, launched the AFSPC 11 mission for the U.S. Air Force. The mission launched the Air Force’s Continuous Broadcast Augmenting SATCOM (CBAS) payload and the EAGLE satellite hosting multiple military experiments. The rocket flew in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 7 and March. Moved forward from April 18. Delayed from April 12. Read our full story. [April 14]
April 11, 2018PSLV • IRNSS 1I
Launch time: 2234 GMT (6:34 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C41 mission, launched the IRNSS 1I navigation satellite. The payload is the ninth spacecraft in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, which aims to improve positioning services over India and neighboring regions. The PSLV flew in the PSLV XL configuration with enlarged solid rocket boosters. Delayed from March. Read our full story. [April 11]
April 10, 2018Long March 4C • Yaogan 31
Launch time: 0425 GMT (12:25 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched three Yaogan 31 military reconnaissance satellites. Delayed from March. Read our full story. [April 10]
April 5, 2018Ariane 5 • Superbird 8/DSN 1 & Hylas 4
Launch time: 2134 GMT (5:34 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA242, to launch the Superbird 8/DSN 1 and Hylas 4 communications satellites. Built by Mitsubishi Electric Corp., the Superbird 8/DSN 1 satellite is a hybrid communications craft for Tokyo-based SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. and the Japanese Ministry of Defense. The Superbird 8/DSN 1 satellite’s launch was delayed from mid-2016 after it was damaged during shipment from Japan to the launch site in French Guiana. Built by Orbital ATK and owned by UK-based Avanti Communications, Hylas 4 will provide broadband and broadcast coverage with a Ka-band payload for customers in Africa, Latin America and Europe. Delayed from March 16 and March 21. Read our full story. [April 5]
April 2, 2018Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 14
Launch time: 2030:38 GMT (4:30:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 16th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 14th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Feb. 9 and March 13. Read our full story. [April 2]
March 30/31, 2018Long March 4C • Gaofen 1-02, 03 & 04
Launch time: 0322 GMT on 31st (11:22 p.m. EDT on 30th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched three Gaofen 1-series Earth observation satellites. Read our full story. [March 31]
March 30, 2018Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 41-50
Launch time: 1413:51 GMT (10:13:51 a.m. EDT; 7:13:51 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage. Delayed from December and March 18. Delayed from March 20 as ripple effect from Paz launch delays. Delayed from March 27 by satellite ground equipment issue. Read our full story. [March 30]
March 29, 2018Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 1756 GMT (1:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket with a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network into Medium Earth Orbit. Read our full story. [March 29]
March 29, 2018Soyuz 2-1v • EMKA
Launch time: 1738 GMT (1:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian Soyuz 2-1v rocket launched with a classified spacecraft for the Russian military based on a new small Earth-imaging satellite design. Read our full story. [March 29]
March 29, 2018GSLV Mk.2 • GSAT 6A
Launch time: 1126 GMT (7:26 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), flying on the GSLV-F08 mission, launched the GSAT 6A satellite to provide S-band communications and demonstrate the performance of a 6-meter unfurlable antenna and other network technologies for future satellite-based mobile communications applications. The GSLV Mk.2 flew with an upgraded Indian-built cryogenic upper stage. Delayed from January, February and March 24. Read our full story. [March 29]
March 21, 2018Soyuz • ISS 54S
Launch time: 1744 GMT (1:44 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-08 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Moved forward from March 14. Delayed from March 10 and March 15. Read our full story. [March 21]
March 17, 2018Long March 2D • LKW-4
Launch time: 0710 GMT (3:10 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched a secretive intelligence-gathering payload for the Chinese military. The name of the payload was announced as LKW-4 after the launch. Analysts believe it is a high-resolution military imaging satellite. Read our full story. [March 17]
March 9, 2018Soyuz • O3b F4
Launch time: 1710:06 GMT (12:10:06 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS18, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the fourth set of four satellites for O3b Networks, which provides broadband service to developing countries. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from March 1 and March 6. Read our full story. [March 9]
March 6, 2018Falcon 9 • Hispasat 30W-6
Launch time: 0533 GMT (12:33 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Hispasat 30W-6 communications satellite, formerly known as Hispasat 1F, for Madrid-based Hispasat. Hispasat 30W-6 will provide television, broadband, corporate networks and other communications services over Europe, North Africa and the Americas. The Hispasat 30W-6 satellite was built by Space Systems/Loral. Delayed from December, Feb. 14 and Feb. 22. Delayed from Feb. 25 to conduct testing on payload fairing pressurization system. Read our full story. [March 6]
March 1, 2018Atlas 5 • GOES-S
Launch time: 2202 GMT (5:02 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-077, launched GOES-S, the second next-generation geostationary weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. GOES-S will orbit 22,300 miles above the equator to monitor weather conditions across the United States. The rocket flew in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Read our full story. [March 1]
Feb. 26/27, 2018H-2A • IGS Optical 6
Launch window: 0434 GMT on 27th (11:34 p.m. EST on 26th)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched an Information Gathering Satellite with an optical reconnaissance payload for the Japanese government. Delayed from Feb. 25 by poor weather forecast. Read our full story. [Feb. 27]
Feb. 22, 2018Falcon 9 • Paz & Microsat-2a and 2b
Launch time: 1417 GMT (9:17 a.m. EST; 6:17 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Paz satellite for Hisdesat of Madrid, Spain. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, Paz carries a radar imaging payload to collect views of Earth for government and commercial customers, along with ship tracking and weather sensors. Two test satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network also launched on the Falcon 9. The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage. Delayed from Jan. 30, Feb. 10, Feb. 17 and Feb. 18. Scrubbed on Feb. 21 by upper level winds. Read our full story. [Feb. 22]
Feb. 13, 2018Soyuz • Progress 69P
Launch time: 0813:33 GMT (3:13:33 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 69th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Feb. 9. Moved up from Feb. 13. Scrubbed on Feb. 11. Read our full story. [Feb. 13]
Feb. 12, 2018Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 0503 GMT (12:03 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket with a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network into Medium Earth Orbit. Delayed from Feb. 11. Read our full story. [Feb. 13]
Feb. 6, 2018Falcon Heavy • Demo Flight
Launch time: 2045 GMT (3:45 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched on its first demonstration flight. The heavy-lift rocket is formed of three Falcon 9 rocket cores strapped together with 27 Merlin 1D engines firing at liftoff. The first Falcon Heavy rocket placed a Tesla Roadster on an Earth escape trajectory into a heliocentric orbit. Delayed from 3rd Quarter of 2015 and April, September and December 2016. Delayed from 1st Quarter 2017, 2nd Quarter 2017 and 3rd Quarter 2017. Delayed from November and December 2017. Delayed from January. Read our full story. [Feb. 6]
Feb. 3, 2018SS-520-5 • TRICOM 1R
Launch time: 0503 GMT (12:03 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s SS-520-5 rocket, a modified sounding rocket with an added third stage, launched on an experimental demonstration flight with the TRICOM 1R spacecraft, a 3U CubeSat with a store and forward communications system and an imaging camera. This was the second flight of an SS-520 variant to attempt an orbital launch after a failure in January 2017. Delayed from Dec. 28. Read our full story. [Feb. 3]
Feb. 2, 2018Long March 2D • CSES
Launch time: 0751 GMT (2:51 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite, also known as Zhangheng 1, and several secondary payloads. Zhangheng 1 is a Chinese-led mission developed in partnership with Italy to study how electromagnetic signals in Earth’s atmosphere and ionosphere could help predict earthquakes. Secondary payloads included the GomX-4A and GomX-4B CubeSats for the Danish Ministry of Defense and the European Space Agency, two ÑuSat Earth-imaging microsatellites for Satellogic of Argentina, and two Chinese CubeSats. Read our full story. [Feb. 2]
Jan. 31/Feb. 1, 2018Soyuz • Kanopus-V 3 and 4
Launch time: 0207:18 GMT on 1st (9:07:18 p.m. EST on 31st)
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the Kanopus-V 3 and 4 Earth observation satellites. The two spacecraft will assist the Russian government in disaster response, mapping and forest fire detection. Multiple secondary payloads from international companies and institutions were also launched on the Soyuz rocket. The Soyuz 2-1a rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 22. Read our full story. [Feb. 1]
Jan. 31, 2018Falcon 9 • GovSat 1
Launch time: 2125 GMT (4:25 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the GovSat 1 communications satellite for LuxGovSat, a joint venture between SES and the government of Luxembourg. The GovSat 1 satellite, also known as SES 16, will provide secure military X-band and Ka-band communications links, helping support Luxembourg’s NATO obligations. The satellite was built by Orbital ATK. The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage. Delayed from December and Jan. 15. Scrubbed on Jan. 30 by upper stage transducer issue. Read our full story. [Jan. 31]
Jan. 25, 2018Ariane 5 • SES 14 & Al Yah 3
Launch time: 2220 GMT (5:20 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA241, to launch the SES 14 and Al Yah 3 communications satellites. The Ariane 5 rocket placed the satellites into an off-target orbit, but the spacecraft were expected to recover and accomplish their missions. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, SES 14 will provide aeronautical and maritime mobility connectivity, wireless communications, broadband delivery, and video and data services over North, Central and South America, the Caribbean, the North Atlantic and parts of Europe, replacing the NSS-806 satellite for SES of Luxembourg. SES 14 also hosts NASA’s Global-Scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) hosted payload to measure densities and temperatures in Earth’s thermosphere and ionosphere. Built by Orbital ATK, Al Yah 3 will support broadband Internet and data services over Africa and Brazil for Yahsat of Abu Dhabi. Moved up from Jan. 23. Delayed from Jan. 18. Read our full story. [Jan. 25]
Jan. 25, 2018Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-04
Launch time: 0539 GMT (12:39 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched with three Yaogan 30-04 surveillance satellites for the Chinese military and a secondary payload named Weina 1A. Read our full story. [Jan. 25]
Jan. 20/21, 2018Electron • Still Testing
Launch time: 0143 GMT on 21st (8:43 p.m. EST on 20th)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its second orbital test flight, which Rocket Lab called “Still Testing,” from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The commercial rocket is designed to carry small spacecraft into orbit. Three commercial CubeSats for Planet and Spire were aboard the Electron’s second mission. Delayed from mid-2017. Delayed from Dec. 8 and Dec. 9. Scrubbed on Dec. 11 and Dec. 12. Scrubbed on Dec. 13 by upper level winds and Dec. 14 by power system fault. Delayed from Dec. 16 for crew rest. Scrubbed on Jan. 20 by ships in keep-out zone. Read our full story. [Jan. 21]
Jan. 19/20, 2018Atlas 5 • SBIRS GEO Flight 4
Launch time: 0048 GMT on 20th (7:48 p.m. EST on 19th)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-076, launched the U.S. military’s fourth Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite, or SBIRS GEO 4, for missile early-warning detection. The rocket flew in the 411 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, one solid rocket booster and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Oct. 27 and Nov. 9. Scrubbed on Jan. 18 by ground valve issue. Read our full story. [Jan. 20]
Jan. 18/19, 2018Long March 11 • Multi-Payload
Launch time: 0412 GMT on 19th (11:12 p.m. EST on 18th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 11 rocket launched six satellites, including two Jilin 1 video imaging satellites for Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. and KIPP, a testbed CubeSat for Canada’s Kepler Communications. The other payloads included commercial and research CubeSats for Chinese companies and institutions. Read our full story. [Jan. 19]
Jan. 17, 2018Epsilon • ASNARO 2
Launch time: 2106:11 GMT (4:06:11 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s Epsilon rocket launched the ASNARO 2 radar Earth observation satellite, a mission developed by Japan Space Systems and NEC Corp. The project is the second for the ASNARO program, which stands for Advanced Satellite with New System ARchitecture for Observation. Delayed from Nov. 11. Delayed from Jan. 16 by poor weather forecast. Read our full story. [Jan. 17]
Jan. 13, 2018Long March 2D • LKW-3
Launch time: 0710 GMT (2:10 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched a secretive intelligence-gathering payload for the Chinese military. The name of the payload was announced as LKW-3 after the launch. Analysts believe it is a high-resolution military imaging satellite. Read our full story. [Jan. 13]
Jan. 12, 2018Delta 4 • NROL-47
Launch time: 2211 GMT (5:11 p.m. EST; 2:11 p.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (5,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Oct. 3, Oct. 18 and Dec. 13. Scrubbed on Jan. 10 by gusty winds that prevented mobile gantry rollback. Scrubbed by multiple technical issues on Jan. 11. Read our full story. [Jan. 12]
Jan. 11/12, 2018PSLV • Cartosat 2F
Launch time: 0359 GMT on 12th (10:59 p.m. EST on 11th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C40 mission, launched India’s Cartosat 2F high-resolution Earth observation satellite. A collection of approximately 30 smaller secondary payloads from Indian and international companies and institutions were also on the launch, which was the first PSLV mission since a payload fairing separation failure in August 2017. The PSLV flew in the PSLV XL configuration with enlarged solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Dec. 30 and Jan. 10. Read our full story. [Jan. 12]
Jan. 11, 2018Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 2318 GMT (6:18 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket with a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network into Medium Earth Orbit. Read our full story. [Jan. 11]
Jan. 8/9, 2018Long March 2D • Superview 1-03 and 04
Launch time: 0324 GMT on 9th (10:24 p.m. EST on 8th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched two SuperView 1 Earth observation satellites for Beijing Space View Technology Co. Also named GaoJing, the satellites will provide sub-meter high-resolution images for civilian and commercial customers in China and internationally. Delayed from December. Read our full story. [Jan. 9]
Jan. 7/8, 2018Falcon 9 • Zuma
Launch time: 0100 GMT on 8th (8:00 p.m. EST on 7th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Zuma payload. Northrop Grumman arranged to launch the Zuma payload with SpaceX on behalf of the U.S. government, but no other details about the mission have been disclosed. Rumors swirled after the launch that the Zuma payload failed after reaching orbit. The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage returned to landing at Landing Zone-1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Delayed from Nov. 15 to complete mission assurance work. Delayed from Nov. 16. Delayed from Jan. 4 and Jan. 5. Read our full story. [Jan. 9]

2017

Dec. 26, 2017Zenit 3F • AngoSat
Launch time: 1900 GMT (2:00 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Ukrainian Zenit rocket with a Russian Fregat upper stage launched the AngoSat communications satellite. Built by RSC Energia in Russia, AngoSat is Angola’s first satellite. Delayed from Dec. 7. Read our full story. [Dec. 26]
Dec. 25, 2017Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-03
Launch time: 1944 GMT (2:44 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched with three Yaogan 30-03 surveillance satellites for the Chinese military. Read our full story. [Dec. 25]
Dec. 22/23, 2017Long March 2D • LKW-2
Launch time: 0414 GMT on 23rd (11:14 p.m. EST on 22nd)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched a secretive intelligence-gathering payload for the Chinese military. The name of the payload was announced as LKW-2 after the launch. Analysts believe it is a high-resolution military imaging satellite. Read our full story. [Dec. 23]
Dec. 22/23, 2017Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 31-40
Launch time: 0127:34 GMT on 23rd (8:27:34 p.m. EST; 5:27:34 p.m. PST on 22nd)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. This mission used a previously-flown first stage booster. Delayed from October and late November. Read our full story. [Dec. 23]
Dec. 22/23, 2017H-2A • GCOM-C & SLATS
Launch time: 0126:22 GMT on 23rd (8:26:22 p.m. EST on 22nd)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket, designated H-2A F37, launched the Global Changing Observation Mission-Climate, or GCOM-C, spacecraft and the Super Low Altitude Test Satellite for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. GCOM-C, nicknamed Shikisai, will conduct surface and atmospheric measurements related to the carbon cycle and radiation budget, such as clouds, aerosols, ocean color, vegetation, and snow and ice. SLATS, nicknamed Tsubame, is an experimental technology demonstration satellite carrying an ion engine that will fly in a “super low” orbit where it will encounter greater air resistance than most spacecraft. Read our full story. [Dec. 23]
Dec. 17, 2017Soyuz • ISS 53S
Launch time: 0721 GMT (2:21 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Oct. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 27. Read our full story. [Dec. 17]
Dec. 15, 2017Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 13
Launch time: 1536:09 GMT (10:36:09 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with a refurbished first stage booster launched the 15th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 13th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage returned to landing at Landing Zone-1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Delayed from Sept. 13, Nov. 1, Dec. 4, Dec. 12 and Dec. 13. Read our full story. [Dec. 15]
Dec. 12, 2017Ariane 5 • Galileo 19-22
Launch time: 1836:07 GMT (1:36:07 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ES rocket, designated VA240, to launch four Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. Delayed from Aug. 9. Read our full story. [Dec. 12]
Dec. 10, 2017Long March 3B • Alcomsat 1
Launch time: 1640 GMT (11:40 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched with the Alcomsat 1 geostationary communications satellite for the government of Algeria. Read our full story. [Dec. 10]
Dec. 2/3, 2017Long March 2D • LKW-1
Launch time: 0411 GMT on 3rd (11:11 p.m. EST on 2nd)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched a secretive intelligence-gathering payload for the Chinese military. The name of the payload was announced as LKW-1 after the launch. Analysts believe it is a high-resolution military imaging satellite. Read our full story. [Dec. 3]
Dec. 2, 2017Soyuz • Lotos-S1
Launch time: 1043 GMT (5:43 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Lotos electronic intelligence spy satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz 2-1b configuration. Read our full story. [Dec. 2]
Nov. 28, 2017Soyuz • Meteor M2-1
Launch time: 0541:46 GMT (12:41:46 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched with the Russian Meteor M2-1 polar-orbiting weather satellite and several secondary payloads, including commercial weather CubeSats for Spire and an experimental low Earth orbit communications satellite for Telesat. The Soyuz 2-1b rocket used a Fregat upper stage, which failed to place the satellites in orbit. Read our full story. [Nov. 28]
Nov. 24, 2017Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-02
Launch time: 1810 GMT (1:10 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched with three Yaogan 30-02 surveillance satellites for the Chinese military. Read our full story. [Nov. 24]
Nov. 20/21, 2017Long March 6 • Jilin 1
Launch time: 0450 GMT on 21st (11:50 p.m. EST on 20th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 6 rocket launched three Jilin 1 Earth observation microsatellites for Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. Read our full story. [Nov. 18]
Nov. 18, 2017Delta 2 • JPSS 1
Launch time: 0947:36 GMT (4:47:36 a.m. EST; 1:47:36 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-2W, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket launched the first spacecraft in the Joint Polar Satellite System, NOAA’s next-generation series of polar-orbiting weather observatories. The rocket flew in the 7920 configuration with nine solid rocket boosters and no third stage. Delayed from March 16. Moved forward from Sept. 23. Delayed from Sept. 21. Delayed from Nov. 10 to change out battery on Delta 2. Scrubbed on Nov. 14 by boats in the range and first stage alarm. Scrubbed on Nov. 15 by unfavorable upper level winds. Read our full story. [Nov. 18]
Nov. 14, 2017Long March 4C • Fengyun 3D
Launch time: 1835 GMT (1:35 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched the Fengyun 3D weather satellite into polar orbit. Read our full story. [Nov. 14]
Nov. 12, 2017Antares • OA-8
Launch time: 1219:51 GMT (7:19:51 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
An Orbital ATK Antares rocket launched the ninth Cygnus cargo freighter on the eighth operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-8. The rocket flew in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from July 6. Moved forward from Oct. 1. Delayed from Sept. 12 and Nov. 10. Scrubbed on Nov. 11 by aircraft in restricted airspace. Read our full story. [Nov. 13]
Nov. 7/8, 2017Vega • Mohammed VI-A
Launch time: 0142:31 GMT on 8th (8:42:31 p.m. EST on 7th)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV11, launched with the Mohammed VI-A Earth observation satellite, also codenamed MN35-13, for the government of Morocco. Read our full story. [Nov. 8]
Nov. 5, 2017Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 1145 GMT (6:45 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network. Read our full story. [Nov. 5]
Oct. 31, 2017Minotaur-C • SkySats
Launch time: 2137 GMT (5:37 p.m. EDT; 2:37 p.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-576E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
An Orbital ATK Minotaur-C rocket launched six SkySat Earth observation satellites and four Dove CubeSats for Planet. The Minotaur-C is an upgraded, renamed version of the Orbital Sciences Taurus rocket. Delayed from late 2015, mid-2016, October 2016, early 2017, May 2017 and September 2017. Delayed from Oct. 17. Read our full story. [Oct. 31]
Oct. 30, 2017Falcon 9 • Koreasat 5A
Launch window: 1934 GMT (3:34 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Koreasat 5A communications satellite for KTsat based in South Korea. Koreasat 5A will provide direct-to-home television broadcast and other communications services over Korea, Japan, the Philippines, Guam, Indochina, and South Asia. The satellite will also support maritime communications. Delayed from July and Oct. 14. Read our full story. [Oct. 30]
Oct. 15, 2017Atlas 5 • NROL-52
Launch time: 0728 GMT (3:28 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-075, launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the 421 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, two solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 31 and Sept. 25. Scrubbed on Oct. 5 and Oct. 6 by bad weather. Scrubbed on Oct. 7 to replace telemetry transmitter on rocket. Read our full story. [Oct. 15]
Oct. 14, 2017Soyuz • Progress 68P
Launch time: 0846:53 GMT (4:46:53 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 68th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Scrubbed on Oct. 12. Read our full story. [Oct. 14]
Oct. 13, 2017Rockot • Sentinel 5P
Launch time: 0927:44 GMT (5:27:44 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Eurockot Rockot vehicle launched with the Sentinel 5 Precursor Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 5p carries an instrument to measure air quality, ozone, pollution and aerosols in Earth’s atmosphere. Delayed from Oct. 31, early 2017, June, August, Sept. 21 and Oct. 9. Read our full story. [Oct. 13]
Oct. 11, 2017Falcon 9 • SES 11/EchoStar 105
Launch time: 2253 GMT (6:53 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the SES-11/EchoStar 105 hybrid communications satellite to replace the AMC-15 and AMC-18 satellites. As SES-11, the spacecraft’s C-band capacity will provide replacement capacity for SES of Luxembourg for AMC-18. EchoStar Corp. of Englewood, Colorado, will market the Ku-Band transponder capacity, with coverage of the 50 U.S. states, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, as EchoStar 105, replacing AMC-15. The Falcon 9 rocket launched with a previously-flown first stage, which landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean a few minutes after liftoff. Delayed from October, November, July and Sept. 27. Delayed from Oct. 6. Read our full story. [Oct. 11]
Oct. 9, 2017H-2A • Michibiki 4
Launch time: 2201:37 GMT (6:01:37 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the Michibiki 4 navigation spacecraft, the fourth member of Japan’s Quasi-Zenith Satellite System. Japan plans to initially deploy four QZSS satellites to augment regional navigation services over Japan and neighboring countries provided by the U.S. Global Positioning System. Read our full story. [Oct. 9]
Oct. 9, 2017Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 21-30
Launch time: 1237:01 GMT (8:37:01 a.m. EDT; 5:37:01 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. The Falcon 9’s first stage landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from October, December, April, August, Sept. 30 and Oct. 4. Read our full story. [Oct. 9]
Oct. 9, 2017Long March 2D • VRSS 2
Launch time: 0413 GMT (12:13 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the second Venezuelan Remote Sensing Satellite, or VRSS 2. The Chinese-built satellite will collect imagery of Earth for the Venezuelan government for scientific research, national security and disaster response applications. Delayed from Sept. 6. Read our full story. [Oct. 9]
Sept. 29, 2017Ariane 5 • Intelsat 37e & BSAT 4a
Launch time: 2156 GMT (5:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA239, to launch the Intelsat 37e and BSAT 4a communications satellites. The high-throughput Intelsat 37e satellite is part of Intelsat’s “Epic” fleet, providing broadband, video and mobile communications services. BSAT 4a will provide digital broadcast services over Japan, including 4K/8K Ultra HD services, for Broadcasting Satellite System Corp. Delayed from Aug. 31. Scrubbed on Sept. 5. Read our full story. [Sept. 29]
Sept. 29, 2017Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-01
Launch time: 0421 GMT (12:21 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched three Yaogan 30-01 satellites for electromagnetic experiments. Read our full story. [Sept. 29]
Sept. 28, 2017Proton • AsiaSat 9
Launch time: 1852:16 GMT (2:52:16 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the AsiaSat 9 communications satellite into orbit. AsiaSat 9 will provide additional capacity, enhanced power and coverage for direct broadcast, video distribution, private networks and broadband services across the Asia-Pacific region for AsiaSat of Hong Kong. Read our full story. [Sept. 28]
Sept. 23/24, 2017Atlas 5 • NROL-42
Launch time: 0549:47 GMT on 24th (1:49:47 a.m. EDT; 10:49:47 p.m. PDT on 23rd)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-072, launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from June 13, Aug. 14, Sept. 11 and Sept. 21. Read our full story. [Sept. 24]
Sept. 21/22, 2017Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 0002:32 GMT on 22nd (8:02:32 p.m. EDT on 21st)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz 2-1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Read our full story. [Sept. 22]
Sept. 12, 2017Soyuz • Soyuz 52S
Launch time: 2117:02 GMT (5:17:02 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Read our full story. [Sept. 12]
Sept. 11, 2017Proton • Amazonas 5
Launch time: 1923:41 GMT (3:23:41 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the Amazonas 5 communications satellite into orbit. Amazonas 5 will provide broadband, television, corporate network and other telecommunications services over Mexico, Central America and South America for Hispasat of Madrid. Read our full story. [Sept. 11]
Sept. 7, 2017Falcon 9 • OTV-5
Launch time: 1400 GMT (10:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the U.S. military’s X-37B, a spaceplane also called the Orbital Test Vehicle, on the program’s fifth mission. The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage returned to landing at Cape Canaveral a few minutes after liftoff. Delayed from Aug. 28. Read our full story. [Sept. 7]
Aug. 31, 2017PSLV • IRNSS 1H
Launch time: 1330 GMT (9:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C39 mission, failed during the launch of the IRNSS 1H navigation satellite. The payload was to be the eighth spacecraft in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, which aims to improve positioning services over India and neighboring regions. The PSLV flew in the PSLV XL configuration with enlarged solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Aug. 28. Read our full story. [Aug. 31]
Aug. 26, 2017Minotaur 4 • ORS 5
Launch window: 0604 GMT (2:04 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-46, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
An Orbital ATK Minotaur 4 rocket launched the ORS 5 mission for the U.S. military’s Operationally Responsive Space program. ORS 5, also known as SensorSat, is designed to scan for other satellites and debris to aid the U.S. military’s tracking of objects in geosynchronous orbit, replacing capability previously provided by the SBSS mission. The Minotaur 4 rocket flew with an Orion 38 fifth stage motor to give the launcher extra capability to place the ORS 5 payload into an equatorial orbit. Delayed from July 15. Read our full story. [Aug. 26]
Aug. 24, 2017Falcon 9 • Formosat 5
Launch time: 1851 GMT (2:51 p.m. EDT; 11:51 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Formosat 5 Earth observation satellite for Taiwan’s National Space Organization (NSPO). The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage returned to landing on a platform downrange in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from July. Read our full story. [Aug. 24]
Aug. 19, 2017H-2A • Michibiki 3
Launch window: 0529 GMT (1:29 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket, designated H-2A F35, launched the Michibiki 3 navigation spacecraft, the third member of Japan’s Quasi-Zenith Satellite System. Japan plans to initially deploy four QZSS satellites to augment regional navigation services over Japan and neighboring countries provided by the U.S. Global Positioning System. Delayed from Aug. 11 by poor weather forecast. Scrubbed on Aug. 12 by helium leak. Read our full story. [Aug. 19]
Aug. 18, 2017Atlas 5 • TDRS M
Launch time: 1229 GMT (8:29 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-074, launched the TDRS M communications and data relay satellite for NASA. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) connects mission control with the International Space Station and other orbiting satellites. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Moved forward from Aug. 4. Delayed from Aug. 3. Moved forward from Aug. 20. Read our full story. [Aug. 18]
Aug. 16, 2017Proton • Blagovest No. 11L
Launch time: 2207 GMT (6:07 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage launched the Blagovest No. 11L communications satellite to cover Russian territory and provide high-speed Internet, television and radio broadcast, and voice and video conferencing services for Russian domestic and military users. Read our full story. [Aug. 16]
Aug. 14, 2017Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 12
Launch time: 1631:37 GMT (12:31:37 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 14th Dragon spacecraft on the 12th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage returned to landing at Cape Canaveral a few minutes after liftoff. Delayed from Dec. 15, 1st Quarter, April 8, June 1 and Aug. 10. Moved up from Aug. 14. Delayed from Aug. 13. Read our full story. [Aug. 14]
Aug. 1/2, 2017Vega • Optsat 3000 & Venus
Launch time: 0158:33 GMT on 2nd (9:58:33 p.m. EDT on 1st)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV10, launched with the Optsat 3000 high-resolution reconnaissance satellite for the Italian military and the French-Israeli Venus environmental satellite to monitor the health of vegetation and test an experimental plasma thruster system in orbit. Read our full story. [Aug. 1]
July 28, 2017Soyuz • ISS 51S
Launch time: 1541:12 GMT (11:41:12 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from May 29. Read our full story. [July 28]
July 14, 2017Soyuz • Kanopus-V-IK
Launch time: 0636:49 GMT (2:36:49 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the Kanopus-V-IK infrared Earth observation satellite for Roscosmos. Several other payloads, including multiple small spacecraft from U.S. companies, were also be aboard the launch. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 22 and Jan. 28. Read our full story. [July 14]
July 5, 2017Falcon 9 • Intelsat 35e
Launch time: 2338 GMT (7:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Intelsat 35e communications satellite. The high-throughput Intelsat 35e satellite is part of Intelsat’s “Epic” fleet, providing broadband, video and mobile communications services over eastern North America, the Caribbean, South America, Europe and Africa. Delayed from April and July 1. Scrubbed on July 2 and July 3. Read our full story. [July 5]
July 2, 2017Long March 5 • Shijian 18
Launch time: 1123:23 GMT (7:23:23 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket failed in the launch of the Shijian 18 communications satellite. Shijian 18 was the first spacecraft based on the new DFH-5 communications satellite platform, a heavier, higher-power next-generation design. Delayed from June. Read our full story. [July 2]
June 28, 2017Ariane 5 • Hellas-Sat 3/Inmarsat S EAN & GSAT 17
Launch time: 2115 GMT (5:15 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA238, to launch the Hellas-Sat 3/Inmarsat S EAN and GSAT 17 communications satellites. The Hellas-Sat 3/Inmarsat S EAN “condosat” spacecraft will support the European Aviation Network, delivering high-capacity Wi-Fi connectivity to airline passengers throughout Europe, on behalf of Inmarsat of London and provide direct television broadcast services over Europe and Africa for the Greek operator Hellas-Sat. GSAT 17 will support national communications services over India for the Indian Space Research Organization. Read our full story. [June 28]
June 25, 2017Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 11-20
Launch time: 2025:14 GMT (4:25:14 p.m. EDT; 1:25:14 p.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from October, December and April. Moved forward from June 29. Read our full story. [June 25]
June 23, 2017Falcon 9 • BulgariaSat 1
Launch time: 1910 GMT (3:10 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the BulgariaSat 1 communications satellite. BulgariaSat 1 will provide direct-to-home television broadcast and data communications services over southeast Europe for Bulsatcom. The payload is the first geostationary communications satellite owned by a Bulgarian company. The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage was a re-flown booster. Read our full story. [June 23]
June 23, 2017Soyuz 2-1v • Kosmos 2519
Launch time: 1804 GMT (2:04 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian Soyuz 2-1v rocket launched a payload designated Kosmos 2519. Details on the payload were unconfirmed, but some reports suggest the satellite will make geodetic measurements of Earth for Russian military applications. Read our full story. [June 23]
June 22/23, 2017PSLV • Cartosat 2E
Launch time: 0359 GMT on 23rd (11:59 p.m. EDT on 22nd)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C38 mission, launched India’s Cartosat 2E high-resolution Earth observation satellite and a collection of smaller secondary payloads from international customers. The PSLV flew in the PSLV XL configuration with enlarged solid rocket boosters. Delayed from April 15 and May 25. Read our full story. [June 23]
June 18, 2017Long March 3B • Chinasat 9A
Launch time: 1611 GMT (12:11 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Chinasat 9A communications satellite, but failed to place the payload into the proper orbit. Chinasat 9A is designed to provide direct-to-home television broadcast services over China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. Read our full story. [June 18]
June 14/15, 2017Long March 4B • HXMT
Launch time: 0300 GMT on 15th (11:00 p.m. EDT on 14th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope. The HXMT mission will conduct an all-sky survey with a suite of instruments designed to image the universe in the highest-energy X-rays, and study the formation and behavior of black holes and active galactic nuclei. Read our full story. [June 15]
June 14, 2017Soyuz • Progress 67P
Launch time: 0920:13 GMT (5:20:13 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz-2.1a rocket launched the 67th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Read our full story. [June 14]
June 7/8, 2017Proton • EchoStar 21
Launch time: 0345:47 GMT on 8th (11:45:47 p.m. EDT on 7th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the EchoStar 21 communications satellite, formerly known as TerreStar 2. EchoStar 21 will provide mobile broadband services over Europe with an S-band payload for EchoStar Mobile Ltd. Delayed from June 25, Aug. 29, Oct. 10, Nov. 23, Dec. 22, Dec. 28, Jan. 31, February, April 29 and May 29. Read our full story. [June 8]
June 5, 2017GSLV Mk.3 • GSAT 19
Launch time: 1158 GMT (7:58 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) launched on its first orbital test flight with the GSAT 19 experimental communications satellite. Delayed from December, Jan. 18, Jan. 20, March, April and May. Read our full story. [June 3]
June 3, 2017Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 11
Launch time: 2107:38 GMT (5:07:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 13th Dragon spacecraft on the 11th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from June 2, Aug. 15, Jan. 13, Feb. 1, April 9 and May 14. Scrubbed on June 1. Read our full story. [June 3]
June 1, 2017Ariane 5 • ViaSat 2 & Eutelsat 172B
Launch time: 2345 GMT (7:45 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA237, to launch the ViaSat 2 and Eutelsat 172B communications satellites. The ViaSat 2 satellite will provide Ka-band services supporting high-speed Internet connectivity across North America, Central America, the Caribbean and northern South America on airplanes, ships and on land. Eutelsat 172B will provide multi-band communications services, including video broadcasts and data network support from the West Coast of North America to Southeast Asia, and in-flight Internet and television for travelers crossing the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from April 25. Read our full story. [June 1]
May 31/June 1, 2017H-2A • Michibiki 2
Launch time: 0017:46 GMT on June 1 (8:17:46 p.m. EDT on May 31)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the Michibiki 2 navigation spacecraft, the second member of Japan’s Quasi-Zenith Satellite System. Japan plans to initially deploy four QZSS satellites to augment regional navigation services over Japan and neighboring countries provided by the U.S. Global Positioning System. Read our full story. [May 31]
May 25, 2017Soyuz • EKS 2
Launch time: 0634 GMT (2:34 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the EKS 2 early warning satellite for the Russian military. The EKS, or Tundra, satellites fly in highly elliptical tundra orbits. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Read our full story. [May 25]
May 25, 2017Electron • It’s a Test
Launch time: 0420 GMT (12:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its maiden orbital test flight from a new facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island, but failed to reach orbit. The commercial rocket is designed to carry small spacecraft into orbit, but the inaugural launch did not have any satellites on-board. Rocket Lab dubbed the maiden flight “It’s a Test.” Delayed from May 21. Scrubbed on May 22 and May 23. Read our full story. [May 25]
May 18, 2017Soyuz • SES 15
Launch time: 1154:53 GMT (7:54:53 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS17, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the SES 15 communications satellite for SES of Luxembourg. Built by Boeing with an all-electric propulsion system, SES 15 will provide in-flight Internet connectivity for airline passengers, and support government, networking and maritime customers across North America. SES 15 also hosts a payload for the FAA’s Wide Area Augmentation System to enhance airline navigation and safety. The Soyuz 2-1a (Soyuz ST-A) rocket used a Fregat-M upper stage. Read our full story. [May 18]
May 15, 2017Falcon 9 • Inmarsat 5 F4
Launch time: 2321 GMT (7:21 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Inmarsat 5 F4 communications satellite for Inmarsat of London. Inmarsat 5 F4 will be the fourth satellite in Inmarsat’s Global Xpress network. The spacecraft was originally supposed to launch on a Falcon Heavy rocket. Delayed from April 30. Read our full story. [May 15]
May 5, 2017GSLV Mk.2 • GSAT 9
Launch time: 1127 GMT (7:27 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), flying on the GSLV-F09 mission, launched the GSAT 9 satellite to provide communications services over India and neighboring countries. Delayed from March and April 4. Read our full story. [May 5]
May 4, 2017Ariane 5 • SGDC & Koreasat 7
Launch time: 2150 GMT (5:50 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA236, to launch the SGDC and Koreasat 7 communications satellites. The Geostationary Defense and Strategic Communications, or SGDC, satellite will provide X-band and Ka-band military and civil communications services for the Brazilian government and Visiona Tecnologia Espacial, a joint venture between Embraer and Telebras. Koreasat 7 will provide broadcasting and telecommunications services over Korea, the Philippines, Indonesia and India for KTsat of South Korea. Delayed from March 21, March 22 and March 23. Read our full story. [May 4]
May 1, 2017Falcon 9 • NROL-76
Launch time: 1115 GMT (7:15 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. This was SpaceX’s first launch for the NRO. Delayed from April 16. Scrubbed on April 30. Read our full story. [May 1]
April 20, 2017Long March 7 • Tianzhou 1
Launch time: 1141:35 GMT (7:41:35 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 7 rocket launched the Tianzhou 1 cargo freighter to demonstrate China’s capability to resupply and refuel the Tiangong 2 space lab and future space station. Read our full story. [April 20]
April 20, 2017Soyuz • ISS 50S
Launch time: 0713:44 GMT (3:13:44 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from March 11. Read our full story. [April 20]
April 18, 2017Atlas 5 • OA-7
Launch time: 1511:26 GMT (11:11:26 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-070, launched the eighth Cygnus cargo freighter on the seventh operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-7. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March 9, March 21 and March 27. Read our full story. [April 18]
April 12, 2017Long March 3B • Shijian 13/Chinasat 16
Launch time: 1104 GMT (7:04 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the experimental Shijian 13 communications satellite. Shijian 13, also known as Chinasat 16, will demonstrate electric propulsion systems and test a high-throughput communications payload to provide Internet connectivity on airliners and high-speed trains. Read our full story. [April 12]
March 30, 2017Falcon 9 • SES 10
Launch time: 2227 GMT (6:27 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the SES 10 communications satellite. Owned by SES of Luxembourg, the spacecraft will provide direct-to-home TV broadcasting and other telecommunication services for Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America and South America. It will also cover Brazil and support offshore oil and gas exploration. Delayed from 3rd Quarter, October, February March 27 and March 29. Read our full story. [March 30]
March 17/18, 2017Delta 4 • WGS 9
Launch time: 0018 GMT on 18th (8:18 p.m. EDT on 17th)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched the ninth Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Feb. 2, March 2, March 8 and March 17. Read our full story. [March 17]
March 16/17, 2017H-2A • IGS Radar 5
Launch time: 0120 GMT on 17th (9:20 p.m. EDT on 16th)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched an Information Gathering Satellite with a radar reconnaissance payload for the Japanese government. Delayed from March 16. Read our full story. [March 17]
March 16, 2017Falcon 9 • EchoStar 23
Launch time: 0600 GMT (2 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the EchoStar 23 communications satellite for EchoStar Corp. EchoStar 23, based on a spare platform from the canceled CMBStar 1 satellite program, will provide direct-to-home television broadcast services over Brazil. Delayed from 3rd quarter, 4th quarter, Jan. 8, Jan. 26, Jan. 30, Feb. 3 and Feb. 28. Scrubbed on March 12. Read our full story. [March 16]
March 6/7, 2017Vega • Sentinel 2B
Launch time: 0149:24 GMT on 7th (8:49:24 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV09, launched with the Sentinel 2B Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 2A carries an optical imaging payload for land observation. Read our full story. [March 6]
March 2, 2017KT-2 • TK-1
Launch time: 2353 GMT (6:53 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese KT-2 rocket launched on its first mission with the TK-1 satellite, an experimental payload designed to test remote sensing and small spacecraft technologies. Read our full story. [March 2]
March 1, 2017Atlas 5 • NROL-79
Launch time: 1749:51 GMT (12:49:51 p.m. EST; 9:49:51 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-068, launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 1, Jan. 26 and Feb. 9. Read our full story. [March 1]
Feb. 22, 2017Soyuz • Progress 66P
Launch time: 0558:33 GMT (12:58:33 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 66th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Feb. 1, Feb. 2 and Feb. 21. Read our full story. [Feb. 22]
Feb. 19, 2017Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 10
Launch time: 1439 GMT (9:39 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 12th Dragon spacecraft on the 10th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Feb. 13, June 10 and Aug. 1. Moved up from Nov. 21. Delayed from Nov. 11, Jan. 22 and Feb. 8. Moved up from Feb. 15. Delayed from Feb. 14. Scrubbed on Feb. 18. Read our full story. [Feb. 19]
Feb. 14/15, 2017PSLV • Cartosat 2D
Launch time: 0358 GMT on 15th (10:58 p.m. EST on 14th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C37 mission, launched India’s Cartosat 2D high-resolution Earth observation satellite and a collection of 103 smaller secondary payloads from international customers. Delayed from Jan. 27. Read our full story. [Feb. 14]
Feb. 14, 2017Ariane 5 • Sky Brasil 1 & Telkom 3S
Launch time: 2139 GMT (4:39 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA235, to launch the Intelsat 32e/Sky Brasil 1 and Telkom 3S communications satellites. The Intelsat 32e/Sky Brasil 1 satellite will provide direct-to-home television programming for DirecTV Latin America customers in Brazil. Telkom 3S will support high-definition television broadcasts, Internet traffic and mobile networks over Indonesia, Malaysia and other parts of Southeast Asia for PT Telkom. Read our full story. [Feb. 14]
Jan. 27/28, 2017Soyuz • Hispasat 36W-1
Launch time: 0103:34 GMT on 28th (8:03:34 p.m. EST on 27th)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS16, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the Hispasat 36W-1 communications satellite. Also known as Hispasat AG1, the satellite is based on the Small GEO platform developed by OHB and the European Space Agency and is owned by Madrid-based Hispasat to provide communications services over Spain, Portugal and the Americas. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket used a Fregat-MT upper stage. Read our full story. [Jan. 27]
Jan. 24, 2017H-2A • DSN 2
Launch time: 0744 GMT (2:44 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the DSN 2 military communications satellite for the Japanese Ministry of Defense. Owned by DSN Corp., a joint venture between SKY Perfect JSAT, NEC Corp., and NTT Communications, the DSN 2 satellite will provide X-band communications services for Japanese military units. Read our full story. [Jan. 24]
Jan. 20/21, 2017Atlas 5 • SBIRS GEO Flight 3
Launch time: 0042 GMT on 21st (7:42 p.m. EST on 20th)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-066, launched the U.S. military’s third Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite, or SBIRS GEO 3, for missile early-warning detection. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from May 26, July 27 and Oct. 3. Scrubbed on Jan. 19. Read our full story. [Jan. 20]
Jan. 14, 2017SS-520-4 • TRICOM 1
Launch time: 2333 GMT (6:33 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s SS-520-4 rocket, a modified sounding rocket with an added third stage, failed during launch on an experimental demonstration flight with the TRICOM 1 spacecraft, a 3U CubeSat with a store and forward communications system and an imaging camera. Scrubbed on Jan. 10. Read our full story. [Jan. 14]
Jan. 14, 2017Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 1-10
Launch time: 1754:39 GMT (12:54:39 p.m. EST; 9:54:39 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from 1st Quarter. Moved up from August. Delayed from July, Sept. 12, Sept. 19, Dec. 16 and Jan. 9. Read our full story. [Jan. 14]
Jan. 8/9, 2017Kuaizhou 1A • Multi-payload
Launch time: 0411 GMT on 9th (11:11 p.m. EST on 8th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched with several Chinese spacecraft, including a Lingqiao Earth observation satellite to collect commercial high-resolution video imagery and two experimental CubeSats. Read our full story. [Jan. 9]
Jan. 5, 2017Long March 3B • TJS 2
Launch time: 1518 GMT (10:18 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the TJS 2 satellite, the second spacecraft in a series of Chinese demonstration missions to test broadcast communications technologies. Delayed from Dec. 30. Read our full story. [Jan. 5]

2016

Dec. 27/28, 2016Long March 2D • SuperView 1
Launch time: 0323 GMT on 28th (10:23 p.m. EST on 27th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched two SuperView 1 Earth observation satellites for Beijing Space View Technology Co. Also named GaoJing, the satellites will provide sub-meter high-resolution images for civilian and commercial customers in China and internationally. Delayed from Dec. 26. Read our full story. [Dec. 28]
Dec. 21, 2016Ariane 5 • Star One D1 & JCSAT 15
Launch time: 2030 GMT (3:30 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA234, to launch the Star One D1 and JCSAT 15 communications satellites. The Star One D1 satellite will provide television, Internet, corporate network and cellular backhaul services over Latin America for Embratel Star One of Brazil. JCSAT 15 will broadcast pay television programming over Japan for SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. Delayed from Dec. 20. Read our full story. [Dec. 21]
Dec. 21, 2016Long March 2D • TanSat
Launch time: 1922 GMT (2:22 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the TanSat spacecraft to map the global distribution of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere and support efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Delayed from Dec. 19. Read our full story. [Dec. 21]
Dec. 20, 2016Epsilon • ERG
Launch time: 1100 GMT (6:00 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s Epsilon rocket launched JAXA’s Exploration of Energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite to investigate the Van Allen radiation belts and study the origins of geomagnetic storms. This launch was the second flight of Japan’s small Epsilon launch vehicle. Read our full story. [Dec. 20]
Dec. 18, 2016Atlas 5 • EchoStar 19
Launch time: 1913 GMT (2:13 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-071, launched the EchoStar 19 communications satellite to provide high-speed Internet services for HughesNet in North America. The satellite is also known as Jupiter 2. The rocket flew in the 431 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Nov. 10, Dec. 8 and Dec. 16. Read our full story. [Dec. 18]
Dec. 15, 2016Pegasus XL • CYGNSS
Launch time: 1337:21 GMT (8:37:21 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
L-1011, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
An air-launched Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket deployed NASA’s Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission in orbit. The CYGNSS mission’s eight satellites will use GPS signals to study how tropical cyclones grow stronger over warm ocean waters. Delayed from Oct. 17 and Nov. 21. Scrubbed on Dec. 12. Delayed from Dec. 14. Read our full story. [Dec. 15]
Dec. 10, 2016Long March 3B • Fengyun 4A
Launch time: 1611 GMT (11:11 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Fengyun 4A geostationary weather satellite for the China Meteorological Administration. Fengyun 4A is the first satellite a new series of Chinese geostationary weather platforms designed to collect imagery of storm systems, atmospheric sounding measurements, lightning maps and observations of space weather phenomena. Read our full story. [Dec. 10]
Dec. 9, 2016H-2B • HTV 6
Launch time: 1326:47 GMT (8:26:47 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket launched the sixth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an unmanned cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. Delayed from Sept. 30. Read our full story. [Dec. 9]
Dec. 7, 2016Delta 4 • WGS 8
Launch time: 2353 GMT (6:53 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched the eighth Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Sept. 22, Sept. 28, Oct. 20 and Nov. 17. Moved forward from Dec. 15. Read our full story. [Dec. 7]
Dec. 6/7, 2016PSLV • Resourcesat 2A
Launch time: 0455 GMT on 7th (11:55 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C36 mission, launched India’s Resourcesat 2A Earth observation satellite designed to support agriculture and urban planning, monitor water resources and land use, and help officials respond to natural disasters. Delayed from Nov. 23. Read our full story. [Dec. 7]
Dec. 5, 2016Vega • Gokturk 1
Launch time: 1351:44 GMT (8:51:44 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
A European Vega rocket, designated VV08, launched with the Gokturk 1 reconnaissance satellite for the Turkish military. Read our full story. [Dec. 5]
Dec. 1, 2016Soyuz • Progress 65P
Launch time: 1451:52 GMT (9:51:52 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket failed during launch of the 65th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from April 22 and Oct. 20. Read our full story. [Dec. 1]
Nov. 22, 2016Long March 3C • Tianlian 1-04
Launch time: 1524 GMT (10:24 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket launched China’s fourth Tianlian 1 data relay satellite. Read our full story. [Nov. 22]
Nov. 19, 2016Atlas 5 • GOES-R
Launch time: 2342 GMT (6:42 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-069, launched GOES-R, the first next-generation geostationary weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. GOES-R will orbit 22,300 miles above the equator to monitor weather conditions across the United States. The rocket flew in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March 11. Moved forward from Oct. 14. Delayed from Oct. 13, Nov. 4 and Nov. 16. Read our full story. [Nov. 19]
Nov. 17, 2016Soyuz • ISS 49S
Launch time: 2020 GMT (3:20 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Moved forward from Nov. 16. Delayed from Nov. 15. Read our full story. [Nov. 17]
Nov. 17, 2016Ariane 5 • Galileo 15-18
Launch time: 1306:48 GMT (8:06:48 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ES rocket, designed VA233, to launch four Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. Read our full story. [Nov. 17]
Nov. 11, 2016Long March 2D • Yunhai 1
Launch time: 2314 GMT (6:14 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Yunhai 1 weather satellite into polar orbit. Read our full story. [Nov. 11]
Nov. 11, 2016Atlas 5 • WorldView 4
Launch time: 1830:33 GMT (1:33:30 p.m. EST; 10:30:33 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-062, launched the WorldView 4 Earth observation satellite for DigitalGlobe. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from June 29 and Sept. 15. Scrubbed on Sept. 16. Delayed from Sept. 26 and Nov. 6. Read our full story. [Nov. 11]
Nov. 9, 2016Long March 11 • XPNAV 1
Launch time: 2342 GMT (6:42 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 11 rocket launched the X-ray Pulsar Navigation (XPNAV 1) satellite to test spacecraft navigation techniques using periodic X-ray emissions from pulsars. Read our full story. [Nov. 9]
Nov. 3, 2016Long March 5 • Shijian 17
Launch time: 1243 GMT (8:43 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket launched on its inaugural flight from a new launch pad on Hainan Island. The heavy-lift rocket is among the world’s most powerful boosters, and it will be used to launch components of China’s planned space station and interplanetary missions. The maiden flight carried the experimental Shijian 17 satellite to geostationary orbit. Read our full story. [Nov. 3]
Nov. 2, 2016H-2A • Himawari 9
Launch time: 0620 GMT (2:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the Himawari 9 weather satellite for the Japan Meteorological Agency. Himawari 9 will collect weather imagery over the East Asia and Western Pacific regions. Delayed from 3rd Quarter and Nov. 1. Read our full story. [Nov. 2]
Oct. 19, 2016Soyuz • ISS 48S
Launch time: 0805 GMT (4:05 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Sept. 22. Read our full story. [Oct. 19]
Oct. 17, 2016Antares • OA-5
Launch time: 2345 GMT (7:45 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
An Orbital ATK Antares rocket launched the seventh Cygnus cargo freighter on the sixth operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-5. The rocket flew in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from May 31, June 24, July 6, Aug. 22, September, Oct. 13, Oct. 14 and Oct. 16. Read our full story. [Oct. 17]
Oct. 16, 2016Long March 2F • Shenzhou 11
Launch time: 2330:31 GMT (7:30:31 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2F rocket launched the Shenzhou 11 spacecraft, a crewed mission to dock with the orbiting Tiangong 2 laboratory module. The flight is China’s sixth human space mission. Delayed from mid-2016. Read our full story. [Oct. 16]
Oct. 5, 2016Ariane 5 • Sky Muster 2 & GSAT 18
Launch time: 2030 GMT (4:30 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA231, to launch the Sky Muster 2 (NBN Co 1B) and GSAT 18 communications satellites. The Sky Muster 2 satellite will provide high-speed Internet services for Australia’s National Broadband Network. GSAT 18 is a multipurpose communications satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. Sky Muster 2 replaced Japan’s Superbird 8 satellite on the mission after it was damaged during transport to the launch site. Delayed from July 12 and July 26. Scrubbed on Oct. 4. Read our full story. [Oct. 5]
Sept. 25/26, 2016PSLV • ScatSat 1
Launch time: 0342 GMT on 26th (11:42 p.m. EDT on 25th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C35 mission, launched India’s ScatSat 1 spacecraft designed to aid tropical cyclone forecasting. A collection of smaller secondary payloads from India, the United States and Algeria were also be aboard the launch. Delayed from July, early August and late August. Read our full story. [Sept. 26]
Sept. 15/16, 2016Vega • PeruSat 1 & SkySats 4-7
Launch time: 0143:35 GMT on 16th (9:43:35 p.m. EDT on 15th)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
A European Vega rocket, designated VV07, launched with the PeruSat 1 reconnaissance satellite for the Peruvian government and four SkySat Earth observation satellites for Google/Terra Bella. Delayed from July. Read our full story. [Sept. 15]
Sept. 15, 2016Long March 2F • Tiangong 2
Launch time: 1404 GMT (10:04 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2F rocket launched the Tiangong 2 mini-space station laboratory module designed for docking tests and crewed visits. Delayed from early 2016. Read our full story. [Sept. 15]
Sept. 13, 2016Shavit 2 • Ofew 11
Launch time: 1430 GMT (10:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Palmachim Air Force Base, Israel
An Israeli Shavit 2 rocket launched the Ofeq 11 electro-optical reconnaissance satellite for the Israeli Defense Ministry. Read our full story. [Sept. 13]
Sept. 8, 2016Atlas 5 • OSIRIS-REx
Launch time: 2305 GMT (7:05 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-067, launched NASA’s OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission. The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) will reach asteroid Bennu in 2018 to collect surface samples for return to Earth in 2023. The rocket flew in the 411 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, one solid rocket booster and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 28. Read our full story. [Sept. 8]
Sept. 8, 2016GSLV Mk.2 • Insat 3DR
Launch time: 1120 GMT (7:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), flying on the GSLV-F05 mission, launched the Insat 3DR geostationary weather satellite. The rocket flew in the GSLV Mk.2 configuration with an Indian-built cryogenic third stage. Delayed from Aug. 28. Read our full story. [Sept. 8]
Aug. 31, 2016Long March 4C • Gaofen 10
Launch time: 1855 GMT (2:55 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket failed during the launch of the Gaofen 10 Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [Aug. 31]
Aug. 24, 2016Ariane 5 • Intelsat 33e & Intelsat 36
Launch time: 2216:01 GMT (6:16:01 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA232, to launch the Intelsat 33e and Intelsat 36 communications satellites. Intelsat 33e is the second Intelsat Epic high throughput satellite, hosting a next-generation all-digital payload that can be reconfigured in orbit and is resilient to interference and jamming. Intelsat 33e offers coverage in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Intelsat 36 will provide television broadcast and other communications services over Africa and South Asia. Read our full story. [Aug. 24]
Aug. 19, 2016Delta 4 • AFSPC 6
Launch time: 0452 GMT (12:52 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched the AFSPC 6 mission for the U.S. Air Force carrying the third and fourth satellites for the Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program, or GSSAP. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (4,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. Delayed from July 21 and Aug. 4. Read our full story. [Aug. 19]
Aug. 15, 2016Long March 2D • Quantum Science Satellite
Launch time: 1740 GMT (1:40 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched with the Quantum Science Satellite, the world’s first mission to test ultra-secure quantum communications in orbit. Delayed from July. Read our full story. [Aug. 15]
Aug. 14, 2016Falcon 9 • JCSAT 16
Launch time: 0526 GMT (1:26 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the JCSAT 16 communications satellite for Tokyo-based SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. JCSAT 16 will be a backup satellite for Ku-band and Ka-band communications services over the Japanese market. Read our full story. [Aug. 14]
Aug. 9, 2016Long March 4C • Gaofen 3
Launch time: 2255 GMT (6:55 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched the Gaofen 3 Earth observation satellite to collect all-weather high-resolution radar imagery for resource monitoring, environmental surveys and disaster response. Read our full story. [Aug. 9]
Aug. 5, 2016Long March 3B • Tiantong 1
Launch time: 1622 GMT (12:22 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Tiantong 1 mobile communications satellite. Read our full story. [Aug. 5]
July 28, 2016Atlas 5 • NROL-61
Launch time: 1237 GMT (8:37 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-065, launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the 421 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, two solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from April 21, June 14 and June 24. Moved forward from July 29. Read our full story. [July 28]
July 18, 2016Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 9
Launch time: 0445:29 GMT (12:45:29 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 11th Dragon spacecraft on the ninth operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Dec. 9, June 24, June 27 and July 16. Read our full story. [July 18]
July 16, 2016Soyuz • Progress 64P
Launch time: 2141:45 GMT (5:41:45 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 64th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from April 22, July 4 and July 7. Read our full story. [July 16]
July 6/7, 2016Soyuz • ISS 47S
Launch time: 0136 GMT on 7th (9:36 p.m. EDT on 6th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the manned Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the crew. Delayed from May 20, June 21 and June 24. Read our full story. [July 7]
June 28/29, 2016Long March 4B • Shijian 16
Launch time: 0321 GMT on 29th (11:21 p.m. EDT on 28th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched a Shijian 16 electronic surveillance satellite for the Chinese government. Read our full story. [June 29]
June 25, 2016Long March 7 • Maiden Flight
Launch time: 1200 GMT (8 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 7 rocket launched on its first flight with a re-entry capsule to demonstrate technologies for China’s next-generation human-rated spacecraft. The launch also marked the first mission from China’s new Wenchang Satellite Launch Center on Hainan Island. Moved forward from June 26. Read our full story. [June 25]
June 24, 2016Atlas 5 • MUOS 5
Launch time: 1430 GMT (10:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-063, launched the fifth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite for the U.S. Navy. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide narrowband tactical communications designed to significantly improve ground communications for U.S. forces on the move. The rocket flew in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from May 5 and May 27. Read our full story. [June 24]
June 21/22, 2016PSLV • Cartosat 2C
Launch time: 0356 GMT on 22nd (11:56 p.m. EDT on 21st)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C34 mission in the PSLV-XL configuration, launched the Cartosat 2C high-resolution Earth observation satellite and a collection of smaller secondary payloads from international customers. Delayed from May, June 10 and June 20. Read our full story. [June 22]
June 18, 2016Ariane 5 • EchoStar 18 & BRIsat
Launch time: 2138:32 GMT (5:38:32 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA230, to launch the EchoStar 18 and BRIsat communications satellites. EchoStar 18 will provide direct-to-home television broadcast services over North America for EchoStar and Dish Network. BRIsat will support banking services provided by BRI, a large Indonesian bank. Delayed from May, June 7, June 8 and June 16. Scrubbed on June 17. Read our full story. [June 18]
June 15, 2016Falcon 9 • ABS 2A & Eutelsat 117 West B
Launch time: 1429 GMT (10:29 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the ABS 2A and Eutelsat 117 West B communications satellites. ABS 2A will distribute direct-to-home television, mobile and maritime communications services across Russia, India, the Middle East, Africa, Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean region for Asia Broadcast Satellite of Bermuda and Hong Kong. Eutelsat 117 West B will provide Latin America with video, data, government, and mobile services for Paris-based Eutelsat. Built by Boeing, the satellites launched in a conjoined configuration and will use all-electric propulsion for orbit-raising. Delayed from 4th quarter 2015, March, April, May 3 and late May. Moved forward from June 16. Delayed from June 14. Read our full story. [June 15]
June 12, 2016Long March 3C • Beidou
Launch time: 1530 GMT (11:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket will launch a Beidou navigation satellite into orbit for the Chinese government. Read our full story. [June 12]
June 11, 2016Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-37
Launch time: 1751 GMT (1:51 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket launched a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from April 27, May 12, June 3 and June 4. Scrubbed on June 9. Read our full story. [June 11]
June 9, 2016Proton • Intelsat 31/DLA-2
Launch time: 0710 GMT (3:10 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the Intelsat 31/DLA-2 communications satellite owned by Intelsat. A majority of Intelsat 31’s capacity will be leased to DirecTV Latin America to provide direct-to-home television broadcasts to Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Delayed from April 23, May 17, May 28 and June 8. Read our full story. [June 9]
June 4, 2016Rockot • GEO-IK 2
Launch time: 1400 GMT (10:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Rockot launch vehicle and Breeze KM upper stage launched the GEO-IK 2 spacecraft. The satellite is designed to survey Earth to measure variations in the gravitational field and study other geodetic features of the planet. Delayed from May. Read our full story. [June 4]
May 29/30, 2016Long March 4B • Ziyuan 3-2
Launch time: 0317 GMT on 30th (11:17 p.m. EDT on 29th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched the second Ziyuan 3 land survey satellite and the ÑuSat 1 and ÑuSat 2 commercial high-resolution Earth observation microsatellites for Satellogic of Argentina. Read our full story. [May 30]
May 29, 2016Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 0844:37 GMT (4:44:37 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz 2-1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from May 21. Read our full story. [May 29]
May 27, 2016Falcon 9 • Thaicom 8
Launch time: 2139 GMT (5:39 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Thaicom 8 communications satellite. Thaicom 8 will provide Ku-band broadcast and data services to Thailand, Southeast Asia, India and Africa. Moved forward from June. Scrubbed on May 26. Read our full story. [May 27]
May 24, 2016Soyuz • Galileo 13 & 14
Launch time: 0848:43 GMT (4:48:43 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS15, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried two Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket used a Fregat-MT upper stage. Read our full story. [May 24]
May 15, 2016Long March 2D • Yaogan 30
Launch time: 0243 GMT on 15th (10:43 p.m. EDT on 14th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched with the Yaogan 30 military reconnaissance satellite. Read our full story. [May 15]
May 6, 2016Falcon 9 • JCSAT 14
Launch time: 0521 GMT (1:21 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the JCSAT 14 communications satellite for Tokyo-based SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. JCSAT 14 will support data networks, television broadcasters and mobile communications users in Japan, East Asia, Russia, Oceania, Hawaii and other Pacific islands. Delayed from late 2015, April 28, May 3, May 4 and May 5. Read our full story. [May 6]
April 28, 2016PSLV • IRNSS 1G
Launch time: 0720 GMT (3:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C33 mission in the PSLV-XL configuration, launched the IRNSS 1G navigation satellite. The payload is the seventh spacecraft in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, which aims to improve positioning services over India and neighboring regions. Delayed from March 31. Read our full story. [April 28]
April 27/28, 2016Soyuz • Mikhailo Lomonosov
Launch time: 0201 GMT on 28th (10:01 p.m. EDT on 27th)
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched for the first time from the new Vostochny Cosmodrome in Russia’s Far East, carrying a satellite named Mikhailo Lomonosov with instruments to study high-energy cosmic rays, gamma rays and the Earth’s upper atmosphere and magnetosphere. Two smaller secondary payloads, named Aist 2 and SamSat 218, also launched aboard the Soyuz rocket. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration with a Volga upper stage. Delayed from April 25. Scrubbed on April 26. Read our full story. [April 28]
April 25, 2016Soyuz • Sentinel 1B & Microscope
Launch time: 2102:13 GMT (5:02:13 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS14, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the Sentinel 1B radar observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission, the Microscope microsatellite to research gravitational forces, and three CubeSats sponsored by the European Space Agency. The Soyuz 2-1a (Soyuz ST-A) rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Moved forward from April 14. Delayed from April 12, April 22 and April 23. Scrubbed on April 24. Read our full story. [April 25]
April 8, 2016Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 8
Launch time: 2043:31 GMT (4:43:31 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 10th Dragon spacecraft on the eighth operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Aug. 13, Sept. 2, Jan. 3, Feb. 7, March 20 and March 29. Read our full story. [April 8]
April 5, 2016Long March 2D • Shijian 10
Launch time: 1738 GMT (1:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Shijian 10 recoverable satellite with a package of physical science, materials science, and biological experiments. The spacecraft will return to Earth after several weeks in orbit. Read our full story. [April 5]
March 31, 2016Soyuz • Progress 63P
Launch time: 1623:57 GMT (12:23:57 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 63rd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Feb. 12. Read our full story. [March 31]
March 29, 2016Long March 3A • Beidou
Launch time: 2011 GMT (4:11 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3A rocket launched a Beidou navigation satellite into orbit for the Chinese government. Read our full story. [March 29]
March 24, 2016Soyuz • Bars-M
Launch time: 0942 GMT (5:42 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Bars-M spy satellite for the Russian military. The Soyuz rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration with a digital flight control system. Read our full story. [March 24]
March 22/23, 2016Atlas 5 • OA-6
Launch time: 0305:52 GMT on 23rd (11:05:52 p.m. EDT (on 22nd)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-064, launched the sixth Orbital Sciences Cygnus cargo freighter on its fifth operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-6. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March 10 and March 20. Read our full story. [March 23]
March 18, 2016Soyuz • ISS 46S
Launch time: 2126:38 GMT (5:26:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the manned Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the crew. Read our full story. [March 18]
March 14, 2016Proton • ExoMars 2016
Launch time: 0931:42 GMT (5:31:42 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the European Space Agency’s ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. The mission will make improved measurements of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere, such as methane, which could be an indicator of biological activity. ESA’s Schiaparelli lander accompanied the Trace Gas Orbiter to Mars. Delayed from Jan. 7. Read our full story. [March 14]
March 13, 2016Soyuz • Resurs P3
Launch time: 1856 GMT (2:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the Resurs P3 Earth observation satellite to collect remote sensing data for Russian government agencies and foreign customers. Scrubbed on March 12. Read our full story. [March 13]
March 10, 2016PSLV • IRNSS 1F
Launch time: 1031 GMT (5:31 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C32 mission in the PSLV-XL configuration, launched the IRNSS 1F navigation satellite. The payload is the sixth spacecraft in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, which aims to improve positioning services over India and neighboring regions. Delayed from December and February. Read our full story. [March 10]
March 9, 2016Ariane 5 • Eutelsat 65 West A
Launch time: 0520 GMT (12:20 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA229, to launch the Eutelsat 65 West A communications satellite. Eutelsat 65 West A will provide direct-to-home video broadcasts and broadband Internet services to Eutelsat customers in Latin America and Brazil. Delayed from Feb. 25. Read our full story. [March 9]
March 4, 2016Falcon 9 • SES 9
Launch time: 2335 GMT (6:35 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the SES 9 communications satellite. Owned by SES of Luxembourg, the spacecraft will provide direct-to-home and other communications services over Northeast Asia, South Asia and Indonesia, as well as maritime communications for vessels in the Indian Ocean. The rocket flew on a full-thrust version of the Falcon 9 rocket. Delayed from July 15, August, November, December and Feb. 6. Scrubbed on Feb. 24, Feb. 25, Feb. 28 and March 1. Read our full story. [March 4]
Feb. 17, 2016H-2A • Astro-H
Launch time: 0845 GMT (3:45 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the Astro-H X-ray observatory for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Astro-H will observe the X-ray universe, studying objects such as supernova explosions, supermassive black holes, and galaxy clusters. Delayed from late 2015 and Feb. 12. Read our full story. [Feb. 17]
Feb. 16, 2016Rockot • Sentinel 3A
Launch time: 1757:45 GMT (12:57:45 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Eurockot Rockot vehicle launched with the Sentinel 3A Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 3A carries instruments to measure sea surface topography, sea and land surface temperature, and ocean and land color. Delayed from Oct. 31 and Dec. 10. Read our full story. [Feb. 16]
Feb. 10, 2016Delta 4 • NROL-45
Launch time: 1140:32 GMT (6:40:32 a.m. EST; 3:40:32 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office, the U.S. government agency that develops and owns spy satellites. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (5,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. Delayed from April 15, June 6, Sept. 15 and Dec. 9. Read our full story. [Feb. 10]
Feb. 6/7, 2016Unha 3 • Kwangmyongsong 4
Launch time: 0029 GMT on 7th (7:29 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
Sohae Satellite Launch Center, North Korea
A North Korean Unha rocket launched from the Tongchang-ri launch base and a Kwangmyongsong Earth observation satellite into orbit, according to the North Korean government. Read our full story. [Feb. 7]
Feb. 6/7, 2016Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 0021 GMT on 7th (7:21 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 29. Read our full story. [Feb. 7]
Feb. 5, 2016Atlas 5 • GPS 2F-12
Launch time: 1338 GMT (8:38 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-057, launched the U.S. Air Force’s 12th Block 2F navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Jan. 26 and Feb. 3. Read our full story. [Feb. 5]
Feb. 1, 2016Long March 3C • Beidou
Launch time: 0729 GMT (2:29 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket launched a Beidou navigation satellite into orbit for the Chinese government. The rocket flew with a Yuanzheng upper stage. Read our full story. [Feb. 1]
Jan. 29, 2016Proton • Eutelsat 9B
Launch time: 2220:09 GMT (5:20:09 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the Eutelsat 9B communications satellite owned by Paris-based Eutelsat. Eutelsat 9B will provide digital television and video programming across Europe. The spacecraft hosts the first payload for the European Space Agency’s European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) system to relay communications between ground stations and satellites in low Earth orbit. Delayed from Jan. 25 and Jan. 27. Read our full story. [Jan. 29]
Jan. 27, 2016Ariane 5 • Intelsat 29e
Launch time: 2320:48 GMT (6:20:48 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA228, to launch the Intelsat 29e communications satellite. Intelsat 29e is the first Intelsat Epic high throughput satellite, hosting a next-generation all-digital payload that can be reconfigured in orbit and is resilient to interference and jamming. Intelsat 29e offers coverage spanning North and South America, the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the North Atlantic aeronautical route connecting North America and Europe. Read our full story. [Jan. 27]
Jan. 19/20, 2016PSLV • IRNSS 1E
Launch time: 0401 GMT on 20th (11:01 p.m. EST on 19th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C31 mission in the PSLV-XL configuration, launched the IRNSS 1E navigation satellite. The payload is the fifth spacecraft in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, which aims to improve positioning services over India and neighboring regions. Delayed from September and November. Read our full story. [Jan. 20]
Jan. 17, 2016Falcon 9 • Jason 3
Launch time: 1842:18 GMT (1:42:18 p.m. EST; 10:42:18 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Jason 3 ocean altimetry mission. Jason 3 will measure ocean surface topography to aid in ocean circulation and climate change research for NOAA, EUMETSAT, NASA and the French space agency, CNES. Delayed from March 31, July 22 and December. Read our full story. [Jan. 17]
Jan. 15, 2016Long March 3B • Belintersat 1
Launch time: 1657 GMT (11:57 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Belintersat 1 communications satellite for the government of Belarus. Read our full story. [Jan. 15]

2015

Dec. 28, 2015Long March 3B • Gaofen 4
Launch time: 1604 GMT (11:04 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Gaofen 4 Earth observation satellite. Gaofen 4 will be positioned in geostationary orbit with optical and infrared staring imagers for continuous observations of China and surrounding regions. Read our full story. [Dec. 28]
Dec. 24, 2015Proton • Express AMU1
Launch time: 2131:19 GMT (4:31:19 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the Express AMU1 communications satellite for the Russian Satellite Communications Co. Express AMU1 will provide broadcast communications services to Russia for RSCC and communications coverage over sub-Saharan Africa for Eutelsat, which calls its part of the spacecraft payload Eutelsat 36C. Delayed from Dec. 19. Read our full story. [Dec. 24]
Dec. 21/22, 2015Falcon 9 • Orbcomm OG2
Launch time: 0129 GMT on 22nd (8:29 p.m. EST on 21st)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 11 second-generation Orbcomm communications satellites. The satellites will operate for Orbcomm Inc., providing two-way data messaging services for global customers. The rocket flew on a full-thrust version of the Falcon 9 rocket with upgraded Merlin 1D engines, stretched fuel tanks, and a payload fairing. Delayed from December 2014 and 1st Quarter 2015 and August. Delayed from Dec. 19 and Dec. 20. Read our full story. [Dec. 22]
Dec. 21, 2015Soyuz • Progress 62P
Launch time: 0844 GMT (3:44 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 62nd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Moved forward from Feb. 12. Delayed from Nov. 19 and Nov. 21. Read our full story. [Dec. 21]
Dec. 17, 2015Soyuz • Galileo 11 & 12
Launch time: 1151:56 GMT (6:51:56 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS13, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried two Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket used a Fregat-MT upper stage. Read our full story. [Dec. 17]
Dec. 16/17, 2015Long March 2D • DAMPE
Launch time: 0012 GMT on 17th (7:12 p.m. EST on 16th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Dark Matter Particle Explorer, a satellite designed to measure high-energy particles in space in search of dark matter. Read our full story. [Dec. 16]
Dec. 16, 2015PSLV • TeLEOS 1
Launch time: 1230 GMT (7:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C29 mission in the PSLV-CA configuration, launched six satellites for Singapore. The largest of the satellites, TeLEOS 1, is an Earth observation satellite designed to operate in an equatorial orbit for ST Electronics and AgilSpace. Five other satellites aboard the launch were developed by university students in Singapore will test new technologies, observe Earth and study the climate. Read our full story. [Dec. 16]
Dec. 15, 2015Soyuz • ISS 45S
Launch time: 1103:09 GMT (6:03:09 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the manned Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the crew. Delayed from Nov. 20. Read our full story. [Dec. 15]
Dec. 12/13, 2015Proton • Garpun
Launch time: 0019 GMT on 13th (7:19 p.m. EST on 12th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the Garpun communications satellite into orbit for the Russian military. Delayed from May 19, Dec. 2 and Dec. 10. Read our full story. [Dec. 13]
Dec. 11, 2015Zenit 3SLBF • Elektro-L 2
Launch time: 1345:33 GMT (8:45:33 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Ukrainian Zenit rocket with a Russian Fregat upper stage launched Russia’s Elektro-L 2 geostationary weather satellite. Read our full story. [Dec. 11]
Dec. 9, 2015Long March 3B • Chinasat 1C
Launch time: 1646 GMT (11:46 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Chinasat 1C communications satellite. Read our full story. [Dec. 9]
Dec. 6, 2015Atlas 5 • OA-4
Launch time: 2144:57 GMT (4:44:57 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-061, launched the fifth Orbital Sciences Cygnus cargo freighter on its fourth operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-4. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Nov. 19. Scrubbed on Dec. 3, Dec. 4 and Dec. 5. Read our full story. [Dec. 6]
Dec. 5, 2015Soyuz 2-1v • Kanopus ST
Launch time: 1409 GMT (9:09 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz 2-1v rocket with a Volga upper stage launched with the Kanopus ST Earth observation satellite, but the primary payload failed to separate from the launcher. Delayed from Feb. 1. Read our full story. [Dec. 5]
Dec. 2/3, 2015Vega • LISA Pathfinder
Launch time: 0404 GMT on 3rd (11:04 p.m. EST on 2nd)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
A European Vega rocket, designated VV06, launched with the European Space Agency’s LISA Pathfinder mission. LISA Pathfinder will test the concept of gravitational wave detection from the L1 Lagrangian point between the Earth and sun. Delayed from July, Oct. 2, Nov. 27 and Dec. 2. Read our full story. [Dec. 3]
Nov. 26, 2015Long March 4C • Yaogan 29
Launch time: 2124 GMT (4:24 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched the Yaogan 29 reconnaissance satellite. Read our full story. [Nov. 26]
Nov. 24, 2015H-2A • Telstar 12 Vantage
Launch time: 0650 GMT (1:50 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the Telstar 12 Vantage communications satellite for Telesat. Telstar 12V will provide broadband communications coverage over the Americas, the Atlantic Ocean, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The rocket flew in the “204” configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Read our full story. [Nov. 24]
Nov. 20, 2015Long March 3B • LaoSat 1
Launch time: 1607 GMT (11:07 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the LaoSat 1 communications satellite. LaoSat 1 will provide telecommunications and broadcast services for Laos and Southeast Asia. Read our full story. [Nov. 20]
Nov. 17, 2015Soyuz • EKS 1
Launch time: 0634 GMT (1:34 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the EKS 1 early warning satellite for the Russian military. The EKS, or Tundra, satellites fly in highly elliptical tundra orbits. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Read our full story. [Nov. 17]
Nov. 10, 2015Ariane 5 • Badr 7 & GSAT 15
Launch time: 2134 GMT (4:34 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA227, to launch the Badr 7 and GSAT 15 satellites. The Badr 7 satellite, also known as Arabsat 6B, will provide direct-to-home television programming and broadband services over the Middle East, Africa and Central Asia for Arabsat. GSAT 15 will provide communications services over India for the Indian Space Research Organization. Delayed from Nov. 5. Read our full story. [Nov. 10]
Nov. 8, 2015Long March 4B • Yaogan 28
Launch time: 0706 GMT (2:06 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched the Yaogan 28 reconnaissance satellite. Read our full story. [Nov. 8]
Nov. 3/4, 2015Super Strypi • ORS 4
Launch time: 0345 GMT on 4th (10:45 p.m. EST on 3rd)
Launch site:
Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii
The ORS 4 mission was a first flight demonstration of the experimental, low-cost Super Strypi small launch system. The Operationally Responsive Space office is managing development of Super Strypi in partnership with the University of Hawaii, Sandia National Laboratories, the Pacific Missile Range Facility and Aerojet Rocketdyne Corp. The goal is to deliver payloads in the range of 300 kilograms to low Earth orbit. A Super Strypi launch vehicle failed to deliver the HiakaSat spacecraft and multiple CubeSat payloads into orbit on the ORS 4 mission. Delayed from October 2013, April and October 2014. Delayed from January 2015. Delayed from Oct. 29. Read our full story. [Nov. 3]
Nov. 3, 2015Long March 3B • Chinasat 2C
Launch time: 1625 GMT (11:25 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Chinasat 2C communications satellite. Read our full story. [Nov. 3]
Oct. 31, 2015Atlas 5 • GPS 2F-11
Launch time: 1613 GMT (12:13 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-060, will launch the U.S. Air Force’s 11th Block 2F navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Sept. 16, Sept. 22 and Oct. 30. Read our full story. [Oct. 31]
Oct. 26, 2015Long March 2D • Tianhui 1C
Launch time: 0710 GMT (3:10 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Tianhui 1C mapping satellite. Read our full story. [Oct. 26]
Oct. 16, 2015Proton • Turksat 4B
Launch time: 2040:11 GMT (4:40:11 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage deployed the Turksat 4B communications satellite. Delayed from June 2014 and early 2015. Delayed from June 30, Oct. 5 and Oct. 13. Read our full story. [Oct. 16]
Oct. 16, 2015Long March 3B • Apstar 9
Launch time: 1616 GMT (12:16 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Apstar 9 communications satellite. Apstar 9 will provide commercial video broadcast, VSAT connectivity and cellular backhaul services over the Asia-Pacific and Southeast Asia for APT Satellite. Read our full story. [Oct. 16]
Oct. 8, 2015Atlas 5 • NROL-55
Launch time: 1249 GMT (8:49 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-058, launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug

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