November 28, 2020

Launch Log

This listing shows the completed space launches from spaceports around the globe in 2019 and 2020. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. For earlier missions, see pages listing launches from 2004 through 2008, from 2009 through 2011, from 2012 through 2014, from 2015 through 2016, and from 2017 through 2018.

2020

Nov. 24/25, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink V1.0-L15
Launch time: 0213:12 GMT on 25th (9:13:12 p.m. EST on 24th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 16th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink V1.0-L15. Delayed from October and Nov. 21. Scrubbed on Nov. 22. Delayed from Nov. 23. Read our full story. [Nov. 25]
Nov. 23, 2020Long March 5 • Chang’e 5
Launch time: 2030 GMT (3:30 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket launched the Chang’e 5 mission to return samples from the moon. It is the first lunar sample return mission attempted since 1976. Delayed from November 2019. Read our full story. [Nov. 23]
Nov. 21, 2020Falcon 9 • Sentinel 6-Michael Freilich
Launch time: 1717:08 GMT (12:17:08 p.m. EST; 9:17:08 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Sentinel 6A, or Jason-CS A, satellite. The satellite is also named Sentinel 6-Michael Freilich in honor of the late director of NASA’s Earth science division. The satellite is a joint mission between the European Space Agency, NASA, NOAA, CNES and Eumetsat to continue the sea level data record previously collected by the Jason series of satellites. Sentinel 6A, built by Airbus Defense and Space and Thales Alenia Space in Europe, also joins the European Commission’s Copernicus Earth observation satellite network. Delayed from Nov. 10 by Merlin 1D engine issue. Read our full story. [Nov. 21]
Nov. 19/20, 2020Electron • “Return to Sender”
Launch window: 0220:01 GMT on 20th (9:20:01 p.m. EST on 19th)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched 30 small satellites and payloads for a range of customers, including TriSept, Unseenlabs, Swarm Technologies, Te Pūnaha Ātea – Auckland Space Institute, and Gabe Newell, co-founder of global gaming software company Valve. Rocket Lab recovered the Electron rocket’s first stage by parachute for the first time. Delayed from Nov. 15 and Nov. 18. Read our full story. [Nov. 20]
Nov. 16/17, 2020Vega • SEOSat-Ingenio & Taranis
Launch time: 0152:20 GMT on 17th (8:52:20 p.m. EST on 16th)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV17, failed during launch with the SEOSat-Ingenio Earth observation satellite and the Taranis scientific research satellite for Spanish and French customers. The SEOSat-Ingenio Earth-imaging satellite was managed by the Spanish Center for Development of Industry Technology, an arm of the Spanish government, in partnership with the European Space Agency. Airbus Defense and Space built the SEOSat-Ingenio spacecraft. The Taranis spacecraft, developed by the French space agency CNES, was designed to study the transfers of energy between the Earth atmosphere and the space environment occurring above thunderstorms. Delayed from June by coronavirus concerns. Delayed from Aug. 25 and September in ripple effect from Vega/SSMS POC delays. Moved forward from Nov. 18. Delayed from Nov. 13. Read our full story. [Nov. 17]
Nov. 15/16, 2020Falcon 9 • Crew-1
Launch time: 0027:17 GMT on 16th (7:27:17 p.m. EST on 15th)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first operational flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, and Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi launched on the Crew Dragon Resilience spacecraft. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from late September, Oct. 23 and Oct. 31. Delayed from Nov. 11. Delayed from Nov. 13 due to weather in drone ship recovery zone. Read our full story. [Nov. 16]
Nov. 13, 2020Atlas 5 • NROL-101
Launch time: 2232 GMT (5:32 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket launched a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket flew in the 531 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. The mission was changed from an earlier planned “551” configuration. This was the first launch of an Atlas 5 rocket with new Northrop Grumman-built GEM 63 solid rocket motors, replacing the Aerojet Rocketdyne AJ-60A solid rocket motors used on previous Atlas 5s. Delayed from September, October, and Nov. 3. Scrubbed on Nov. 4 by valve issue on ground liquid oxygen system. Delayed from Nov. 6, Nov. 8, Nov. 11 and Nov. 12. Read our full story. [Nov. 13]
Nov. 12, 2020Long March 3B • Tiantong 1-02
Launch time: 1559 GMT (10:59 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Tiantong 1-02 mobile communications satellite. Read our full story. [Nov. 12]
Nov. 7, 2020PSLV • EOS 1
Launch time: 0942 GMT (4:42 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C49, launched the EOS 1 radar Earth observation satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. EOS 1 was formerly known as RISAT 2BR2. The PSLV also launched four Kleos Scouting Mission radio surveillance nanosatellites for Kleos Space, a Luxembourg-based company, and multiple Lemur 2 CubeSats for Spire Global. The mission used the PSLV-DL version of the PSLV with two strap-on solid rocket boosters. Delayed from December 2019 and Nov. 6. Read our full story. [Nov. 7]
Nov. 7, 2020Ceres 1 • Tianqi 11
Launch time: 0712 GMT (2:12 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Ceres 1 rocket successfully launched the Tianqi 11 data relay microsatellite. The Ceres 1 rocket is operated by the Chinese startup Galactic Energy. Tianqi 11 joins an Internet of Things constellation owned by Guodian Gaoke. Read our full story. [Nov. 7]
Nov. 5/6, 2020Long March 6 • ÑuSat 9-18
Launch time: 0319 GMT on 6th (10:19 p.m. EST on 5th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 6 rocket launched 10 ÑuSat Earth-imaging satellites for Satellogic, an Argentine satellite manufacturer and remote sensing company. Delayed from Oct. 14. Read our full story. [Nov. 6]
Nov. 5, 2020Falcon 9 • GPS 3 SV04
Launch time: 2324:23 GMT (6:24:23 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the U.S. Air Force’s fourth third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite was built by Lockheed Martin. Delayed from October, December, May, July and August. Moved forward from Sept. 30. Delayed from Sept. 29. Delayed from Sept. 30. Scrubbed on Oct. 2 at T-minus 2 seconds. Due to range turnaround limitations, the launch date of Nov. 4 is contingent upon the launch of an Atlas 5 rocket from nearby pad 41 on Nov. 3. Delayed from Nov. 4. Read our full story. [Nov. 5]
Oct. 28, 2020Electron • “In Focus”
Launch window: 2121:27 GMT (5:21:27 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its 15th flight with the CE-SAT-2B Earth-imaging microsatellite for Canon Electronics and nine SuperDove Earth-imaging nanosatellites for Planet. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “In Focus” in reference to the Earth observation payloads on the mission. Delayed from Oct. 20 due to poor weather forecast. Scrubbed on Oct. 21 to assess sensor data. Read our full story. [Oct. 28]
Oct. 26, 2020Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-07
Launch time: 1519 GMT (11:19 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket will launch with three Yaogan 30-07 surveillance satellites for the Chinese military. The Tianqi 6 data relay CubeSat launched as a secondary payload. Read our full story. [Oct. 26]
Oct. 25, 2020Soyuz • Glonass K
Launch time: 1908:42 GMT (3:08:42 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass K navigation satellite. The Glonass K satellites are upgraded spacecraft for Russia’s Glonass positioning and timing network. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 6, late August, and Oct. 17. Read our full story. [Oct. 25]
Oct. 24, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink V1.0-L14
Launch time: 1531:34 GMT (11:31:34 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 15th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink V1.0-L14. Delayed from Oct. 21. Read our full story. [Oct. 24]
Oct. 18, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink V1.0-L13
Launch time: 1225:57 GMT (8:25:57 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 14th batch of 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink V1.0-L13. Delayed from September and Oct. 10. Read our full story. [Oct. 18]
Oct. 14, 2020Soyuz • ISS 63S
Launch time: 0545:04 GMT (1:45:04 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Read our full story. [Oct. 11]
Oct. 11, 2020Long March 3B • Gaofen 13
Launch time: 1657 GMT (12:57 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Gaofen 13 geosynchronous Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [Oct. 11]
Oct. 6, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink V1.0-L12
Launch time: 1129:34 GMT (7:29:34 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 13th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink V1.0-L12. Scrubbed on Sept. 17 due to recovery weather. Delayed from Sept. 27. Scrubbed on Sept. 28 by poor weather. Aborted on Oct. 1 at T-minus 18 seconds by ground sensor issue. Scrubbed Oct. 5 by bad weather. Read our full story. [Oct. 6]
Oct. 2/3, 2020Antares • NG-14
Launch time: 0116:14 GMT on 3rd (9:16:14 p.m. EDT on 2nd)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launched the 15th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 14th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-14. The rocket flew in the Antares 230+ configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Moved forward from October. Delayed from Aug. 31 and Sept. 7. Moved forward from Oct. 2. Delayed from Sept. 29 by poor weather forecast. Scrubbed on Oct. 1 by ground support equipment problem. Read our full story. [Oct. 3]
Sept. 28, 2020Soyuz • Gonets M
Launch time: 1120 GMT (7:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched three Gonets M communications satellites and a cluster of international rideshare payloads. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Moved forward from Sept. 29. Delayed from Sept. 24. Read our full story. [Sept. 28]
Sept. 26/27, 2020Long March 4B • Huanjing 2A & 2B
Launch time: 0323 GMT on 27th (11:23 p.m. EDT on 26th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched China’s Huanjing 2A & 2B satellites. Chinese officials described the Huanjing payloads as environmental monitoring satellites. Read our full story. [Sept. 27]
Sept. 21, 2020Long March 4B • Haiyang 2C
Launch time: 0540 GMT (1:40 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched China’s Haiyang 2C oceanography satellite. Read our full story. [Sept. 21]
Sept. 14/15, 2020Long March 11H • Jilin 1 Gaofen 03B & Jilin 1 Gaofen 03C
Launch time: 0123 GMT on 15th (9:23 p.m. EDT on 14th)
Launch site:
De Bo 3, Yellow Sea
A Chinese Long March 11H rocket launched from an ocean-going platform in the Yellow Sea with nine small Jilin 1 Earth observation satellites for Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. Six of the satellites are part of the Jilin 1 Gaofen 03B high-resolution imaging constellation, and the other three are Jilin 1 Gaofen 03C video imaging satellites. Read our full story. [Sept. 15]
Sept. 12, 2020Kuaizhou 1A • Jilin 1 Gaofen 02C
Launch time: 0502 GMT (1:02 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket failed to reach orbit with the Jilin 1 Gaofen 02C Earth observation satellite for Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. Read our full story. [Sept. 12]
Sept. 11/12, 2020Rocket 3.1 • Test Flight
Launch time: 0319 GMT on 12th (11:19 p.m. EDT on 11th)
Launch site:
Pacific Spaceport Complex, Kodiak Island, Alaska
A commercial small satellite launch vehicle developed by Astra failed to reach orbit on its first orbital launch attempt. Astra says there were no payloads on this test flight. Scrubbed on Aug. 2 due to upper level winds and boat in range. Scrubbed on Aug. 4 and Aug. 6. Delayed from Aug. 30 due to poor weather forecast. Scrubbed on Sept. 10. full story. [Sept. 12]
Sept. 7, 2020Long March 4B • Gaofen 11-02
Launch time: 0557 GMT (1:57 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched China’s second Gaofen 11-series Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [Sept. 7]
Sept. 4, 2020Long March 2F • Reusable Test Spacecraf
Launch time: 0730 GMT (3:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2F rocket launched a Reusable Test Spacecraft. The Chinese spacecraft, possibly a winged spaceplane, landed back on Earth two days after launch. Read our full story. [Sept. 4]
Sept. 3, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 11
Launch time: 1246:14 GMT (8:46:14 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 12th batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 11. Delayed from Aug. 29 and Sept. 1. full story. [Sept. 3]
Sept. 2/3, 2020Vega • SSMS POC
Launch time: 0151:10 GMT on 3rd (9:51:10 p.m. EDT on 2nd))
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV16, launched on the Small Spacecraft Mission Service (SSMS) Proof of Concept mission with 53 microsatellites, nanosatellites and CubeSats for commercial and institutional customers. This rideshare launch was the first flight of a multi-payload dispenser funded by the European Space Agency to allow the Vega rocket to deliver numerous small satellites to orbit on a single mission. Delayed from August, Sept. 10 and February. Delayed from March 23 due to coronavirus outbreak. Delayed from June 18 due to unfavorable high-altitude winds. Scrubbed on June 27 and June 28 by high-altitude winds. Delayed from Aug. 17 by Ariane 5 delays. Delayed from Sept. 1 by Typhoon Maysak threatening Jeju ground station. full story. [Sept. 3]
Aug. 30/31, 2020Electron • “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Optical”
Launch time: 0305:47 GMT on 31st (11:05:47 p.m. EDT on 30th)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its 14th flight with the Sequoia radar observation satellite for Capella Space, a commercial remote sensing company. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Optical” in reference to Capella’s synthetic aperture radar technology. Delayed from Aug. 26 and Aug. 28 due to weather. full story. [Aug. 31]
Aug. 30, 2020Falcon 9 • SAOCOM 1B
Launch time: 2319:56 GMT (7:19:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the SAOCOM 1B satellite for CONAE, Argentina’s space agency. SAOCOM 1B is the second of two SAOCOM 1-series Earth observation satellites designed to provide radar imagery to help emergency responders and monitor the environment, including the collection of soil moisture measurements. The GNOMES 1 radio occultation satellite and the Tyvak-0182 rideshare payload accompanied SAOCOM 1B into orbit. Delayed from 4th Quarter of 2019, January and February. This mission was originally scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Delayed from March 30 due to coronavirus pandemic. Delayed from Aug. 27 in ripple effect from Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-44 delay. full story. [Aug. 30]
Aug. 22/23, 2020Long March 2D • Gaofen 9-05
Launch time: 0227 GMT on 23rd (10:27 p.m. EDT on 22nd)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched China’s fifth Gaofen 9-series Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [Aug. 23]
Aug. 18, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 10/SkySats 19-21
Launch time: 1431:16 GMT (10:31:16 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 58 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 10. Three SkySat Earth-imaging satellites for Planet launched as rideshare payloads on this mission. Delayed from late July. Read our full story. [Aug. 18]
Aug. 15, 2020Ariane 5 • Galaxy 30, MEV 2 & BSat 4b
Launch time: 2204 GMT (6:04 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA253, to launch the Galaxy 30 communications satellite, the second Mission Extension Vehicle satellite servicing spacecraft, and the BSat 4b broadcasting payload. Galaxy 30 is owned by Intelsat, and will provide video and television broadcast services over the United States. Galaxy 30 also hosts a navigation augmentation payload for the Federal Aviation Administration to support civilian air travel. MEV 2 is the second robotic servicing vehicle for Space Logistics LLC, and will dock with the Intelsat 1002 communications satellite in geostationary orbit to extend its commercial life. BSat 4b will provide direct-to-home 4K and 8K ultra HD broadcast services over Japan and neighboring regions for the Japanese operator B-SAT. Galaxy 30 and MEV 2 were built by Northrop Grumman, and BSat 4b was manufactured by Maxar. Delayed from July 28 to perform additional checks under the fairing. Scrubbed on July 31 by liquid hydrogen tank sensor issue. Delayed from Aug. 14 due to unfavorable upper level winds. Read our full story. [Aug. 15]
Aug. 7, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 9/BlackSky Global
Launch time: 0512:05 GMT (1:12:05 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the tenth batch Starlink satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 9. There were 57 Starlink satellites aboard this mission. Two Earth observation microsatellites for BlackSky Global, a Seattle-based company, launched as rideshare payloads on this mission. Moved forward from June 24. Delayed from June 23, June 25 and June 26. Scrubbed on July 8 due to poor weather. Scrubbed on July 11 due to technical issue. Delayed from July 29, July 31, Aug. 1 and Aug. 6. Read our full story. [Aug. 7]
Aug. 6, 2020Long March 2D • Gaofen 9-04
Launch time: 0401 GMT (12:01 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D launched China’s fourth Gaofen 9-series Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [Aug. 6]
July 30, 2020Proton • Express 80 & Express 103
Launch time: 2125:19 GMT (5:25:19 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage launched the Express 80 and Express 103 communications satellites for the Russian Satellite Communication Company. Express 80 and Express 103 will provode fixed and mobile communications, digital television and radio broadcasting, high-speed Internet access and data transmission services across Russia. The satellites were built by ISS Reshetnev in Russia, with communication payloads supplied by Thales Alenia Space from Europe. Delayed from March 30 and May. Delayed from July 29 to conduct additional checks on the launcher. Read our full story. [July 30]
July 30, 2020Atlas 5 • Mars 2020
Launch window: 1150 GMT (7:50 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket launched NASA’s Mars 2020 rover to the Red Planet. After landing in February 2021, the Mars 2020 rover, named Perseverance, will study Martian geology, search for organic compounds, demonstrate the ability to generate oxygen from atmospheric carbon dioxide, and collect rock samples for return to Earth by a future mission. The rocket flew in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from July 17, July 20 and July 22. Read our full story. [July 30]
July 24/25, 2020Long March 4B • Ziyuan 3-3
Launch time: 0313 GMT on 25th (11:13 p.m. EDT on 24th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched the third Ziyuan 3 land survey satellite. Read our full story. [July 25]
July 23, 2020Soyuz • Progress 76P
Launch time: 1426:21 GMT (10:26:21 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 76th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from July 15. Read our full story. [July 23]
July 23, 2020Long March 5 • Tianwen 1
Launch time: 0441 GMT (12:41 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket launched the Tianwen 1 mission to attempt China’s first landing on Mars. The robotic mission includes an orbiter and a mobile rover to explore the surface of Mars. Read our full story. [July 23]
July 20, 2020Falcon 9 • Anasis 2
Launch time: 2130 GMT (5:30 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Anasis 2, or KMilSatCom 1, communications satellite for the South Korean military. The spacecraft was built by Airbus Defense and Space under contract with Lockheed Martin. Delayed from July 14. Read our full story. [July 20]
July 19, 2020H-2A • Emirates Mars Mission
Launch time: 2158:14 GMT (5:58:14 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched the Emirates Mars Mission for the United Arab Emirates. The Emirates Mars Mission, also called “Hope,” is a Mars orbiter that was developed by the Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Center in Dubai in partnership with the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. Delayed from July 14. Read our full story. [July 19]
July 15, 2020Minotaur 4 • NROL-129
Launch time: 1346 GMT (9:46 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Pad 0B, Wallops Island, Virginia
A U.S. Air Force and Northrop Grumman Minotaur 4 rocket launched four classified payloads for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. Delayed from 4th Quarter 2019, Feb. 15 and March 31. Read our full story. [July 15]
July 10, 2020Kuaizhou 11 • Jilin 1 & Centispace-1-S2
Launch time: 0417 GMT (12:17 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 11 rocket failed on its first mission. The rocket and its two payloads were lost. The Kuaizhou 11 rocket carried a Jilin 1 commercial Earth-imaging satellite developed by Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd, and the Centispace-1-S2 microsatellite. Read our full story. [July 10]
July 9, 2020Long March 3B • Apstar 6D
Launch time: 1211 GMT (8:11 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Apstar 6D communications satellite for APT Mobile Satcom Ltd. Built by the China Academy of Space Technology, the Apstar 6D satellite will provide broadband and mobile communication services over the Asia-Pacific region. Read our full story. [July 9]
July 5/6, 2020Shavit 2 • Ofeq 16
Launch time: 0100 GMT on 6th (9:00 p.m. EDT on 5th)
Launch site:
Palmachim Air Base, Israel
An Israeli Shavit 2 rocket launched the Ofeq 16 high-resolution reconnaissance satellite for the Israeli Ministry of Defense. The spacecraft was built by Israel Aerospace Industries. Read our full story. [July 6]
July 4, 2020Long March 2D • Shiyan 6-02
Launch time: 2344 GMT (7:44 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Shiyan 6-02 satellite to study the space environment and conduct related technology experiments. Read our full story. [July 4]
July 4, 2020Electron • “Pics Or It Didn’t Happen”
Launch time: 2119:36 GMT (5:19:36 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket failed during launch on its 13th flight on a rideshare mission. The Electron rocket was carrying the CE-SAT-IB Earth-imaging satellite for Canon Electronics, five SuperDove Earth observation CubeSats for Planet, and the Faraday 1 CubeSat for In-Space Missions. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “Pics Or It Didn’t Happen.” Delayed from July 3. Read our full story. [July 4]
July 2/3, 2020Long March 4B • Gaofen Multi-Mode Imaging Satellite
Launch time: 0310 GMT on 3rd (11:10 p.m. EDT on 2nd)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched a Gaofen high-resolution multi-mode Earth observation satellite. Read our full story. [July 3]
June 30Falcon 9 • GPS 3 SV03
Launch time: 2010:46 GMT (4:10:46 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the U.S. Air Force’s third third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. The Air Force previously planned to launch the second GPS 3-series satellite on this mission. Delayed from October, December, January and March. Read our full story. [June 30]
June 22/23, 2020Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 0143 GMT on 23rd (9:43 p.m. EDT on 22nd)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched a satellite for the country’s Beidou navigation network toward geostationary orbit. Delayed from May and June 16. Read our full story. [June 23]
June 17, 2020Long March 2D • Gaofen 9-03
Launch time: 0719 GMT (3:19 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D launched China’s third Gaofen 9-series Earth observation satellite, along with the HEAD 5 and Pixing 3A smallsats as secondary payloads. Read our full story. [June 17]
June 13, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 8/SkySats 16-18
Launch time: 0921:18 GMT (5:21:18 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the ninth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 8. Three SkySat Earth-imaging satellites for Planet launched as rideshare payloads on this mission. Delayed from late May in ripple effect from Starlink 7 delays. Delayed from June 12. Read our full story. [June 13]
June 13, 2020Electron • “Don’t Stop Me Now”
Launch time: 0512:12 GMT (1:12:12 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its 12th flight on a rideshare mission. The rocket carried three payloads into orbit for the National Reconnaissance Office, the U.S. government’s spy satellite agency, and the ANDESITE CubeSat for Boston University and NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative, which will study Earth’s magnetosphere and Space Weather. The M2 Pathfinder satellite, a collaboration between the Australian government and the University of New South Wales Canberra Space, was also launched on a communications and technology demonstration mission. Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “Don’t Stop Me Now.” Delayed from March 29 due to coronavirus pandemic. Delayed from May. Scrubbed on June 11. Read our full story. [June 13]
June 10, 2020Long March 2C • Haiyang 1D
Launch time: 1831 GMT (2:31 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched the Haiyang 1D ocean observation satellite. Read our full story. [June 10]
June 3/4, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 7
Launch time: 0125:33 GMT on 4th (9:25:33 p.m. EDT on 3rd)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the eighth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 7. Delayed from May 7. Updated to clarify the possibility of launching May 17, assuming range availability. Delayed from May 17 due to Atlas 5 scrub. Delayed from May 18 due to tropical depression in landing zone. Delayed from May 19 due to Tropical Storm Arthur in booster landing zone. Read our full story. [June 4]
May 31, 2020Long March 2D • Gaofen 9-02
Launch time: 0853 GMT (4:53 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D launched China’s second Gaofen 9-series Earth observation satellite, and the HEAD 4 ship and aircraft tracking microsatellite for Beijing-based HEAD Aerospace. Read our full story. [May 29]
May 30, 2020Falcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 2
Launch time: 1922:45 GMT (3:22:45 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first test flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken launched on the Demo-2 mission. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from June, July 25, Sept. 21, February, April and May 7. Scrubbed on May 27 due to bad weather. Read our full story. [May 29]
May 29, 2020Long March 11 • CX-6-01
Launch time: 2013 GMT (4:13 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 11 launched the small XJS G and XJS H technology experiment satellites. No other information about the satellites was released by Chinese officials. Read our full story. [May 29]
May 25, 2020LauncherOne • Launch Demo
Launch time: 1850 GMT (2:50 p.m. EDT; 11:50 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
Cosmic Girl (Boeing 747), Mojave Air and Space Port, California
A Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket failed to reach orbit on its first orbital test flight after dropping from a modified Boeing 747 carrier aircraft over the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. Delayed from early 2019 and summer 2019. Scrubbed on May 24 by sensor issue. Read our full story. [May 25]
May 22, 2020Soyuz • EKS 4
Launch time: 0731 GMT (3:31 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the EKS 4 early warning satellite for the Russian military. The EKS, or Tundra, satellites fly in highly elliptical tundra orbits. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Read our full story. [May 22]
May 20, 2020H-2B • HTV 9
Launch time: 1731 GMT (1:31 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket launched the ninth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an automated cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. Read our full story. [May 20]
May 17, 2020Atlas 5 • USSF 7/OTV-6
Launch time: 1314 GMT (9:14 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket launched the USSF 7 mission, formerly known as AFSPC 7, for the U.S. Space Force. The mission’s primary payload was the X-37B, a spaceplane also called the Orbital Test Vehicle, on the program’s sixth mission. The rocket flew in the 501 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from December. Moved forward from May 20. Scrubbed on May 16 by high ground winds. Read our full story. [May 17]
May 11/12, 2020Kuaizhou 1A • Xingyun 2-01 & 2-02
Launch time: 0116 GMT on 12th (9:16 p.m. EDT on 11th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched the first two satellites for China’s planned Xingyun Internet of Things communications and data relay constellation. Delayed from April. Read our full story. [May 12]
May 5, 2020Long March 5B • Test Flight
Launch time: 1000 GMT (6:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5B rocket launched on a test flight with an unpiloted prototype for China’s next-generation human-rated crew capsule designed for missions to the country’s planned space station and for human expeditions to the moon. This was the first flight of the Long March 5B variant of China’s most powerful rocket family. The Long March 5B is designed to launch elements of China’s future space station in low Earth orbit. Read our full story. [May 5]
April 24/25, 2020Soyuz • Progress 75P
Launch time: 0151:41 GMT on 25th (9:51:41 p.m. EDT on 24th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 75th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from April 16. Read our full story. [April 25]
April 22, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 6
Launch time: 1930:30 GMT (3:30:30 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the seventh batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 6. Delayed from April 16. Moved forward from April 23. Read our full story. [April 22]
April 22, 2020Qased • Noor
Launch time: 0400 GMT (12:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Shahroud, Iran
An Iranian Qased rocket carried the Noor military satellite into orbit. Read our full story. [April 22]
April 9, 2020Long March 3B • Palapa N1
Launch time: 1146 GMT (7:46 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket failed during launch of the Palapa N1 communications satellite, also known as Nusantara Dua. Palapa N1 is a Chinese-built spacecraft for Indonesia’s Palapa Satelit Nusantara Sejahtera, a joint venture owned by Indosat Ooredoo and Pasifik Satelit Nusantara. Read our full story. [April 9]
April 9, 2020Soyuz • ISS 62S
Launch time: 0805:06 GMT (4:05:06 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Delayed from March 20. Read our full story. [April 9]
March 26, 2020Atlas 5 • AEHF 6
Launch time: 2018 GMT (4:18 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-086, launched the sixth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket flew in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March 13, March 19 and March 26. Read our full story. [March 26]
March 23/24, 2020Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-06
Launch time: 0343 GMT on 24th (11:43 p.m. EDT on 23rd)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched with three Yaogan 30-06 surveillance satellites for the Chinese military. Read our full story. [March 24]
March 21, 2020Soyuz • OneWeb 3
Launch time: 1706:58 GMT (1:06:58 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian Soyuz rocket launched 34 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 5 and March 18. Read our full story. [March 21]
March 18, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 5
Launch time: 1216:39 GMT (8:16:39 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the sixth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 5. Delayed from January, Feb. 14, March 4, March 11 and March 14. Read our full story. [March 18]
March 16, 2020Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 1828 GMT (2:28 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The Soyuz rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration. Delayed from March 15. Read our full story. [March 16]
March 16, 2020Long March 7A • XJY 6
Launch time: 1334 GMT (9:34 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 7A rocket failed during the launch of a classified satellite known as XJY 6. The launch marked the first flight of the Long March 7A rocket variant with a third stage to place spacecraft into high-energy orbits. Read our full story. [March 16]
March 9, 2020Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 1155 GMT (7:55 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched a satellite for the country’s Beidou navigation network toward geostationary orbit. Read our full story. [March 7]
March 6/7, 2020Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 20
Launch time: 0450:31 GMT on 7th (11:50:31 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 22nd Dragon spacecraft mission on its 20th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight was conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. The first stage returned to Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Delayed from Oct. 15, March 1 and March 2. Read our full story. [March 7]
Feb. 20, 2020Soyuz • Meridian M
Launch time: 0824:54 GMT (3:24:54 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage launched a Meridian M communications satellite for the Russian Ministry of Defense. The Soyuz rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Delayed from Jan. 24 and Feb. 9. Read our full story. [Feb. 20]
Feb. 19, 2020Long March 2D • XJS-C, D, E & F
Launch time: 2107 GMT (4:07 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the XJS-C, D, E & F technology experiment satellites designed to test Earth observation systems in orbit. Read our full story. [Feb. 19]
Feb. 18, 2020Ariane 5 • JCSAT 17 & GEO-Kompsat 2B
Launch time: 2218 GMT (5:18 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA252, to launch the Japanese-owned JCSAT 17 communications satellite and the South Korean GEO-Kompsat 2B oceanography satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, the JCSAT 17 satellite will provide high-power video, broadband and mobile communications services over Japan and neighboring regions for Sky Perfect JSAT Corp. of Tokyo. The GEO-Kompsat 2B spacecraft, built and owned by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute, will provide ocean and environmental monitoring services for weather forecasters and scientists from geosynchronous orbit. Read our full story. [Feb. 18]
Feb. 17, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 4
Launch time: 1505:55 GMT (10:05:55 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the fifth batch of 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 4. Delayed from January, Feb. 15 and Feb. 16. Read our full story. [Feb. 17]
Feb. 15, 2020Antares • NG-13
Launch time: 2021:04 GMT (3:21:04 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launched the 14th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 13th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-13. The rocket flew in the Antares 230+ configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Moved forward from April 20. Delayed from Feb. 7. Countdown aborted Feb.9 due to ground equipment issue. Delayed from Feb. 13. Scrubbed on Feb. 14 by upper level winds. Read our full story. [Feb. 15]
Feb. 9/10, 2020Atlas 5 • Solar Orbiter
Launch time: 0403 GMT on 10th (11:03 p.m. EST on 9th)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-087, launched the Solar Orbiter spacecraft for NASA and the European Space Agency. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, Solar Orbiter, or SolO, will travel inside the orbit of Mercury to study how the sun creates and controls the heliosphere, the vast bubble of charged particles blown by the solar wind into the interstellar medium. The rocket flew in the 411 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, one solid rocket booster and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Feb. 5 and Feb. 7. Read our full story. [Feb. 10]
Feb. 9, 2020Simorgh • Zafar 1
Launch time: 1545 GMT (10:45 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Imam Khomeini Spaceport, Semnan, Iran
An Iranian Simorgh rocket failed to place the Zafar 1 Earth observation satellite into orbit. Read our full story. [Feb. 10]
Feb. 8/9, 2020H-2A • IGS Optical 7
Launch window: 0134 GMT on 9th (8:34 p.m. EST on 8th)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket launched an Information Gathering Satellite with an optical reconnaissance payload for the Japanese government. Delayed from Jan. 26. Scrubbed on Jan. 27 by ground facility problem. Read our full story. [Feb. 9]
Feb. 6, 2020Soyuz • OneWeb 2
Launch time: 2142:41 GMT (4:42:41 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian Soyuz rocket launched 34 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Nov. 20, Dec. 19, Jan. 23 and Jan. 30. Read our full story. [Feb. 7]
Jan. 30/31, 2020Electron • NROL-151
Launch time: 0256 GMT on 31st (9:56 p.m. EST on 30th)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its 11th flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed an undisclosed payload into orbit for the National Reconnaissance Office, the U.S. government spy satellite agency. The mission was officially designated NROL-151, and Rocket Lab nicknamed the launch “Birds of a Feather.” Read our full story. [Jan. 31]
Jan. 29, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 3
Launch time: 1406:49 GMT (9:06:49 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the fourth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 3. Delayed from Jan. 20 and Jan. 21. Scrubbed on Jan. 27 by upper level winds. Read our full story. [Jan. 29]
Jan. 16, 2020Ariane 5 • Eutelsat Konnect & GSAT 30
Launch time: 2105 GMT (4:05 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA251, to launch the Eutelsat Konnect and GSAT 30 communications satellites. The Eutelsat Konnect satellite, also known as Eutelsat BB4A, will provide broadband Internet services to Africa. The all-electric Eutelsat Konnect spacecraft is the first satellite built on the new Spacebus Neo platform from Thales Alenia Space. The GSAT 30 satellite will be used for communications services by the Indian Space Research Organization. Delayed from Jan. 15. Read our full story. [Jan. 16]
Jan. 15/16, 2020Kuaizhou 1A • GS-SparkSat-03
Launch time: 0302 GMT on 16th (10:02 p.m. EST on 15th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched the GS-SparkSat-03, or Yinhe 1, spacecraft for GalaxySpace, a Chinese commercial company aiming to deploy a fleet of hundreds of small satellites to provide global broadband communications services. Delayed from Jan. 12. Read our full story. [Jan. 16]
Jan. 14/15, 2020Long March 2D • Jilin 1, ÑuSat 7 & ÑuSat 8
Launch time: 0253 GMT on 15th (9:53 p.m. EST on 14th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D launched a small satellite for the Jilin 1 Earth observation constellation owned by Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. The Long March 2D also launched the ÑuSat 7 and ÑuSat 8 Earth observation microsatellites for Satellogic, a company based on Argentina, and the Chinese Tianqi 2-03 nanosatellite for a communication and data relay mission. Read our full story. [Jan. 15]
Jan. 7. 2020Long March 3B • TJS 5
Launch time: 1520 GMT (10:20 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the TJS 5 satellite. The purpose of the TJS 5 mission is to test communications technology, according to Chinese state media. Some analysts believe TJS 5 is a military early warning satellite. Read our full story. [Jan. 7]
Jan. 6/7, 2020Falcon 9 • Starlink 2
Launch time: 0219:21 GMT on 7th (9:19:21 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the third batch of 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 2. Delayed from Dec. 30 and Jan. 3. Read our full story. [Jan. 7]

2019

Dec. 27, 2019Long March 5 • Shijian 20
Launch time: 1245 GMT (7:45 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket launched the Shijian 20 communications satellite. Shijian 20 is the first spacecraft based on the new DFH-5 communications satellite platform, a heavier, higher-power next-generation design, replacing the Shijian 18 satellite lost on a launch failure in 2017. Delayed from November 2018. Delayed from January and July. Read our full story. [Dec. 27]
Dec. 26, 2019Rockot • Gonets M
Launch time: 2311 GMT (6:11 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Rockot vehicle with a Breeze KM upper stage launched three Gonets M communications satellites. This was the final planned launch of a Rockot launcher. Delayed from June and Nov. 29. Read our full story. [Dec. 26]
Dec. 24, 2019Proton • Elektro-L 3
Launch time: 1203 GMT (7:03 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Block DM upper stage launched the Elektro-L 3 geostationary weather satellite. Delayed from Nov. 20. Read our full story. [Dec. 24]
Dec. 20, 2019Atlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test
Launch time: 1136:43 GMT (6:36:43 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-080, launched Boeing’s first CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on an unpiloted Orbital Test Flight. The capsule was intended to dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States after an orbital shakedown cruise ahead of a three-person Crew Test Flight. After the Starliner encountered trouble soon after a successful launch, Boeing officials changed the flight plan to target an early landing at White Sands, New Mexico. The rocket flew in the “N22” vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 27, 2018. Delayed from January, April, Aug. 17 September, October, Dec. 17 and Dec. 19. Read our full story. [Dec. 18]
Dec. 19/20, 2019Long March 4B • CBERS 4A
Launch time: 0322 GMT on 20th (10:22 p.m. EST on 19th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched the CBERS 4A remote sensing satellite. CBERS 4A is the fifth China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite for the collection of global imagery for environmental, urban planning and agricultural applications. Read our full story. [Dec. 20]
Dec. 18, 2019Soyuz • CSG 1 & CHEOPS
Launch time: 0854:20 GMT (3:54:20 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS23, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the first COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation, or CSG 1, radar surveillance satellite for ASI, the Italian space agency. The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite, or CHEOPS, flew as a secondary payload on the mission. Built by Airbus Defense and Space in Spain with a Swiss-developed science instrument, CHEOPS will observe transits of planets around other stars to measure their radii. The Soyuz-2.1a (Soyuz ST-A) rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Oct. 15 and November. Scrubbed on Dec. 17 due to Fregat software issue. Read our full story. [Dec. 20]
Dec. 16/17, 2019Falcon 9 • JCSAT 18/Kacific 1
Launch time: 0010 GMT on 17th (7:10 p.m. EST on 16th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the JCSAT 18/Kacific 1 communications satellite jointly owned by SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. of Japan and Kacific Broadband Satellites of Singapore. Built by Boeing, the JCSAT 18/Kacific 1 communications satellite will provide mobile and broadband services across the Asia-Pacific region. Delayed from Nov. 11 and Dec. 15. Read our full story. [Dec. 17]
Dec. 16, 2019Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 0722 GMT (2:22 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket and a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two Beidou navigation satellites into medium Earth orbit. Read our full story. [Dec. 16]
Dec. 11, 2019PSLV • RISAT 2BR1
Launch time: 0955 GMT (4:55 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C48, launched the RISAT 2BR1 radar Earth observation satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. The PSLV also launched the QPS-SAR microsatellite developed by iQPS, a Japanese company, the 1HOPSAT technology demonstration and Earth-imaging microsatellite for Hera Systems, four Lemur 2 CubeSats for Spire Global, and additional CubeSats for U.S. Israeli and Italian customers. The rocket flew in the PSLV-QL configuration with four strap-on solid rocket boosters. Delayed from October. Read our full story. [Dec. 11]
Dec. 11, 2019Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 0854 GMT (3:54 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Nov. 16, Dec. 2 and Dec. 10. Read our full story. [Dec. 11]
Dec. 7, 2019Kuaizhou 1A • Multi-payload
Launch time: 0852 GMT (3:52 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched six small satellites, including the HEAD 2A and 2B microsatellites for HEAD Aerospace’s Skywalker environmental monitoring, communications and ship tracking constellation. The Kuaizhou 1A rocket also launched Spacety 16 and 17 small Earth observation satellites to orbit for Spacety Co. Ltd., and two experimental data relay nanosatellites named Tianqi 4A and 4B were also launched for Guodian Gaoke. Read our full story. [Dec. 7]
Dec. 6/7, 2019Kuaizhou 1A • Jilin 1 Gaofen 02B
Launch time: 0255 GMT on 7th (9:55 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched a small satellite to join the Jilin 1 Earth observation constellation owned by Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. Read our full story. [Dec. 7]
Dec. 6, 2019Soyuz • Progress 74P
Launch time: 0934:11 GMT (4:34:11 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 74th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Moved forward from Dec. 20 and Dec. 6. Delayed from Dec. 1. Read our full story. [Dec. 6]
Dec. 6, 2019Electron • “Running Out Of Fingers”
Launch time: 0818 GMT (3:18 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its 10th flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed the ALE-2 microsatellite into orbit for ALE Co. Ltd. of Japan to create human-made shooting stars by simulating re-entering meteor particles. Also on the launch were six spacecraft comprised of 5-centimeter PocketQube picosatellites from satellite manufacturer and mission management provider Alba Orbital. The mission was nicknamed “Running Out Of Fingers.” Delayed from Nov. 25 and Nov. 28. Scrubbed on Nov. 29. Read our full story. [Dec. 6]
Dec. 5, 2019Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 19
Launch time: 1729:24 GMT (12:29:24 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 21st Dragon spacecraft mission on its 19th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Oct. 15. Scrubbed on Dec. 4 by unfavorable upper level winds. Read our full story. [Dec. 5]
Nov. 27, 2019Long March 4C • Gaofen 12
Launch time: 2352 GMT (6:52 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched the Gaofen 12 radar observation satellite. Delayed from Nov. 25. Read our full story. [Nov. 27]
Nov. 26/27, 2019PSLV • Cartosat 3
Launch time: 0358 GMT on 27th (10:58 p.m. EST on 26th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C47, launched the first Cartosat 3-series Earth-imaging and mapping satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization, along with 12 SuperDove Earth-observing nanosatellites for Planet and the Meshbed tech demo CubeSat for Analytical Space. The launch vehicle flew in the “PSLV XL” configuration with six strap-on solid rocket boosters. Delayed from mid-2019, October and Nov. 20. Moved forward from Nov. 27. Delayed from Nov. 25. Read our full story. [Nov. 26]
Nov. 26, 2019Ariane 5 • TIBA 1 & Inmarsat 5 F5
Launch time: 2123 GMT (4:23 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA250, to launch the TIBA 1 and Inmarsat GX5 communications satellites. The TIBA 1 satellite for the Egyptian government was manufactured by Airbus Defense and Space, with a secure communications payload supplied by Thales Alenia Space. The Inmarsat GX5 satellite, also known as Inmarsat 5 F5, is owned by Inmarsat of London and was built by Thales Alenia Space. Inmarsat GX5 is the fifth satellite in Inmarsat’s Global Xpress network. Scrubbed on Nov. 22. Delayed from Nov. 24 and Nov. 25. Read our full story. [Nov. 26]
Nov. 25, 2019Soyuz 2-1v • Kosmos 2542
Launch time: 1752 GMT (12:52 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz 2-1v rocket and Volga upper stage launched a Russian military space surveillance satellite. Read our full story. [Nov. 25]
Nov. 22/23, 2019Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 0055 GMT on 23rd (7:55 p.m. EST on 22nd)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket and a Yuanzheng upper stage launched two Beidou navigation satellites into medium Earth orbit. Read our full story. [Nov. 23]
Nov. 17, 2019Kuaizhou 1A • KL-Alpha
Launch time: 1000 GMT (5:00 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched two small KL-Alpha satellites to perform Ka-band communication tests in orbit. Delayed from Nov. 10. Read our full story. [Nov. 17]
Nov. 13, 2019Long March 6 • Ningxia 1
Launch time: 0635 GMT (1:35 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 6 rocket launched five Ningxia 1 satellites for remote sensing detection mission, according to Chinese state media. Previous reports suggested the satellites are designed for a signals intelligence mission. Read our full story. [Nov. 13]
Nov. 12/13, 2019Kuaizhou 1A • Jilin 1 Gaofen 02A
Launch time: 0340 GMT on 13th (10:40 p.m. EST on 12th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched a small satellite to join the Jilin 1 Earth observation constellation owned by Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd. Scrubbed on Oct. 29. Delayed from Nov. 6. Read our full story. [Nov. 13]
Nov. 11, 2019Falcon 9 • Starlink 1
Launch window: 1456 GMT (9:56 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the second batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 1. Delayed from Oct. 17. Read our full story. [Nov. 11]
Nov. 4, 2019Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 1743 GMT (12:43 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched a Beidou navigation satellite toward a perch in an inclined geosynchronous orbit. Read our full story. [Nov. 4]
Nov. 2/3, 2019Long March 4B • Gaofen 7
Launch time: 0322 GMT on 3rd (11:22 p.m. EDT on 2nd)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched with the Gaofen 7 Earth observation satellite and three secondary payloads, including a CubeSat to test a French-built iodine propulsion system and a scientific satellite for Sudan. Read our full story. [Nov. 3]
Nov. 2, 2019Antares • NG-12
Launch time: 1359:47 GMT (9:59:47 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launched the 13th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 12th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-12. The rocket flew in the Antares 230+ configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from Oct. 1 and Oct. 21. Read our full story. [Nov. 2]
Oct. 17, 2019Long March 3B • TJS 4
Launch time: 1521 GMT (11:21 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the TJS 4 satellite. The purpose of the TJS 4 mission is to test communications technology, according to Chinese state media. Some analysts believe TJS 4 is a military signals intelligence-gathering satellite. Read our full story. [Oct. 17]
Oct. 16/17, 2019Electron • “As The Crow Flies”
Launch time: 0122 GMT on 17th (9:22 p.m. EDT on 16th)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its ninth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed the Palisade CubeSat into orbit for Astro Digital on a technology demonstration mission. Palisade is a 16U CubeSat with an on-board propulsion system and a next-generation communications system. The mission is nicknamed “As The Crow Flies.” Delayed from Oct. 14 by stormy weather forecast. Read our full story. [Oct. 17]
Oct. 10/11, 2019Pegasus XL • ICON
Launch time: 0159 GMT on 11th (9:59 p.m. EDT on 10th)
Launch site:
L-1011, Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
An air-launched Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket deployed NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite into orbit. ICON will study the ionosphere, a region of Earth’s upper atmosphere where terrestrial weather meets space weather. Disturbances in the ionosphere triggered by solar storms or weather activity in the lower atmosphere can cause disturbances in GPS navigation and radio transmissions. The mission’s staging point was changed from Kwajalein Atoll to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in mid-2018. Delayed from June 15, Nov. 14, and Dec. 8, 2017. Delayed from June 14, Sept. 24, Oct. 6, Oct. 26 and Nov. 3. Scrubbed on Nov. 7. Delayed from 1st Quarter 2019. Delayed from Oct. 9 by poor weather. Read our full story. [Oct. 11]
Oct. 9, 2019Proton • Eutelsat 5 West B & MEV 1
Launch time: 1017:56 GMT (6:17:56 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage launched the Eutelsat 5 West B communications satellite and the first Mission Extension Vehicle for Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems. Both spacecraft are built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, formerly known as Orbital ATK. Eutelsat 5 West B will join Eutelsat’s communications fleet in geostationary orbit, replacing the Eutelsat 5 West A spacecraft providing digital and television services primarily in the French, Italian and Algerian markets. The MEV 1 spacecraft is the first in a series of satellite servicing vehicles for SpaceLogistics, a subsidiary of Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems. MEV 1 will dock with the Intelsat 901 communications satellite and provide propulsion and attitude control functions to extend the spacecraft’s mission. Delayed from May and Sept. 30. Read our full story. [Oct. 9]
Oct. 4, 2019Long March 4C • Gaofen 10
Launch time: 1851 GMT (2:51 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket launched with the Gaofen 10 Earth observation satellite, a likely replacement for a spacecraft lost an August 2016 launch failure. Read our full story. [Oct. 4]
Sept. 26, 2019Soyuz • EKS 3
Launch time: 0746 GMT (3:46 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the EKS 3 early warning satellite for the Russian military. The EKS, or Tundra, satellites fly in highly elliptical tundra orbits. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Read our full story. [Sept. 26]
Sept. 25, 2019Soyuz • ISS 61S
Launch time: 1357:43 GMT (9:57:43 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-FG configuration. Read our full story. [Sept. 25]
Sept. 24/25, 2019Long March 2D • Yunhai 1-02
Launch time: 0054 GMT on 25th (8:54 p.m. EDT on 24th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched the Yunhai 1-02 environmental monitoring satellite. Read our full story. [Sept. 25]
Sept. 24, 2019H-2B • HTV 8
Launch time: 1605:05 GMT (12:05:05 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket launched the eighth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an automated cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. Delayed from July. Scrubbed by a launch pad fire on Sept. 10. Delayed from Sept. 23. Read our full story. [Sept. 24]
Sept. 22, 2019Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 2110 GMT (5:10 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket and Yuanzheng upper stage launched two satellites into Medium Earth Orbit for the Beidou navigation constellation. Read our full story. [Sept. 22]
Sept. 19, 2019Long March 11 • Zhuhai 1 Group 3
Launch time: 0642 GMT (2:42 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 11 rocket launched a third group of five Zhuhai 1 remote sensing satellites for a commercial constellation of Earth-imaging craft for Zhuhai Orbita Aerospace Science and Technology Co. Read our full story. [Sept. 19]
Sept. 11/12, 2019Long March 4B • Ziyuan 1-2D
Launch time: 0326 GMT on 12th (11:26 p.m. EDT on 11th)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched with the Ziyuan 1-2D Earth observation satellite, the Ice Pathfinder microsatellite for polar ice observations, and the Taurus 1 CubeSat to test solar sail technology. Read our full story. [Sept. 12]
Aug. 30, 2019Kuaizhou 1A • KX-09 & Xiaoxiang 1-07
Launch time: 2341 GMT (7:41 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Kuaizhou 1A rocket launched a small satellite payload named KX-09 for the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Xiaoxiang 1-07 technology demonstration CubeSat for Spacety. Delayed from Aug. 29. Read our full story. [Aug. 30]
Aug. 30, 2019Rockot • Geo-IK 2
Launch time: 1400 GMT (10 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Rockot vehicle with a Breeze KM upper stage launched a GEO-IK 2 spacecraft. The satellite is designed to survey Earth to measure variations in the gravitational field and study other geodetic features of the planet. Read our full story. [Aug. 30]
Aug. 22, 2019Delta 4 • GPS 3 SV02
Launch time: 1306 GMT (9:06 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched the U.S. Air Force’s second third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. The Air Force previously planned to launch the third GPS 3-series satellite on this mission. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (4,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Nov. 1, Dec. 13, April 4 and July 25. Read our full story. [Aug. 22]
Aug. 21/22, 2019Soyuz • ISS 60S
Launch time: 0338:32 GMT on 22nd (11:38:32 p.m. EDT on 21st)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft to the International Space Station on a test flight without a crew on-board. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration, and will demonstrate the compatibility of the Soyuz spacecraft with the newer Soyuz-2 rocket variant before approving the launcher for future crewed missions. Read our full story. [Aug. 22]
Aug. 19, 2019Electron • “Look Ma, No Hands”
Launch time: 1212 GMT (8:12 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its eighth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed four small satellites into orbit on a rideshare mission arranged by Spaceflight and Rocket Lab. The payloads included the BlackSky Global 4 commercial Earth observation satellite, two tech demo CubeSats for Air Force Space Command’s Pearl White program, and commercial CubeSat for the French company UnseenLabs, which is developing a constellation of maritime surveillance spacecraft. The mission was nicknamed “Look Ma, No Hands.” Scrubbed on Aug. 16 due to high ground winds. Read our full story. [Aug. 19]
Aug. 19, 2019Long March 3B • Chinasat 18
Launch time: 1203 GMT (8:03 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched with the Chinasat 18 communications spacecraft for China Satcom, a state-owned operator that provides government and commercial communications services. Chinasat 18 will provide fixed and mobile Ku-band and Ka-band connectivity over the Asia-Pacific region. Read our full story. [Aug. 19]
Aug. 17, 2019Jielong 1 • Multi-payload
Launch time: 0411 GMT (12:11 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Jielong 1 rocket launched on its first orbital mission with three small satellites. The Jielong 1 was developed by China Rocket Co., Ltd. using a commercial business model. The rocket delivered three Earth-observation and data relay satellites to orbit. Read our full story. [Aug. 17]
Aug. 8, 2019Atlas 5 • AEHF 5
Launch time: 1013 GMT (6:13 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket launched the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket flew in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Moved forward from July. Delayed from June 27 to replace battery. Delayed from July 17 to address suppler component cross-over concern. Read our full story. [Aug. 8]
Aug. 6, 2019Falcon 9 • Amos 17
Launch time: 2323 GMT (7:23 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Amos 17 communications satellite. Built by Boeing and owned by Spacecom Ltd. of Israel, Amos 17 will provide high-throughput broadband connectivity and other communications services over Africa, the Middle East and Europe. Delayed from May 27, June, July 24, Aug. 3 and Aug. 5. Read our full story. [Aug. 6]
Aug. 6, 2019Ariane 5 • Intelsat 39 & EDRS-C
Launch time: 1930 GMT (3:30 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA249, to launch the Intelsat 39 and EDRS-C communications satellites. Built by SSL, the Intelsat 39 satellite will replace Intelsat 902 and provide broadband networking and video distribution services in Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia, plus broadband connectivity for mobile users in the Indian Ocean region. The EDRS-C satellite, built by OHB System AG, will be the second node in the European Data Relay System, a network developed by the European Space Agency and Airbus Defense and Space providing high-speed laser communications links between low-orbiting satellites and ground stations. EDRS-C also carries a hosted steerable Ka-band communications payload named Hylas 3 for Avanti Communications. Delayed from June, July 24, July 30 and Aug. 2. Read our full story. [Aug. 6]
Aug. 5, 2019Proton • Blagovest No. 14L
Launch time: 2156 GMT (5:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage launched the Blagovest No. 14L communications satellite to cover Russian territory and provide high-speed Internet, television and radio broadcast, and voice and video conferencing services for Russian domestic and military users. Delayed from April, May 17, May 23 and July 15. Read our full story. [Aug. 5]
July 31, 2019Soyuz • Progress 73P
Launch time: 1210:46 GMT (8:10:46 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 73rd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from June 5. Read our full story. [July 31]
July 30, 2019Soyuz • Meridian
Launch time: 0556 GMT (1:56 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage launched a Meridian communications satellite for the Russian Ministry of Defense. Read our full story. [July 30]
July 25/26, 2019Long March 2C • Yaogan 30-05
Launch time: 0357 GMT on 26th (11:57 p.m. EDT on 25th)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket launched with three Yaogan 30-05 surveillance satellites for the Chinese military. Read our full story. [July 26]
July 25, 2019Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 18
Launch time: 2201:56 GMT (6:01:56 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 20th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 18th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from May 7, July 8, July 18, July 21 and July 22. Read our full story. [July 25]
July 25, 2019Hyperbola 1 • Multi-payload
Launch time: 0500 GMT (1:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Hyperbola 1 rocket developed by i-Space, a commercial space company in China, successfully launched on its first orbital mission with several small payloads, including the CAS-7B amateur radio satellite. Read our full story. [July 25]
July 22, 2019GSLV Mk.3 • Chandrayaan 2
Launch time: 0913 GMT (5:13 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) launched the Chandrayaan 2 mission, India’s second mission to the moon. Chandrayaan 2 consists of an orbiter, the Vikram lander and rover launched together into a high Earth orbit. The orbiter is designed to use on-board propulsion to reach the moon, then release the lander and rover. Chandrayaan 2 was originally slated to launch on a GSLV Mk.2 vehicle, but Indian officials decided to switch to a larger GSLV Mk.3 vehicle in 2018. Delayed from March, April and October 2018. Delayed from Jan. 3, Jan. 30, February, March and April. Scrubbed on July 14. Read our full story. [July 22]
July 20, 2019Soyuz • ISS 59S
Launch time: 1628:20 GMT (12:28:20 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from July 5. Read our full story. [July 20]
July 13, 2019Proton • Spektr-RG
Launch time: 1230:57 GMT (8:30:57 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Block DM upper stage launched the Spektr-RG X-ray observatory. Spektr-RG is a joint project between Roscosmos and DLR, the Russian and German space agencies. The mission will conduct an all-sky X-ray survey, observing galaxies and large-scale galactic clusters to help astronomers examine the role of dark energy and dark matter in the evolution of the universe. Delayed from April. Delayed from June 21 to address battery problem. Delayed from July 12 due to launch vehicle issue. Read our full story. [July 13]
July 10/11, 2019Vega • Falcon Eye 1
Launch time: 0153:03 GMT on 11th (9:53:03 p.m. EDT on 10th)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV15, failed during launch with the Falcon Eye 1 high-resolution Earth-imaging satellite for the United Arab Emirates. Built by Airbus Defense and Space with an optical imaging payload from Thales Alenia Space, Falcon Eye 1 was the first of two surveillance satellites ordered by the UAE’s military. Delayed from June. Delayed from July 5. Read our full story. [July 11]
July 10, 2019Soyuz 2-1v • Kosmos 2535-2538
Launch time: 1714 GMT (1:14 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz 2-1v rocket and Volga upper stage launched four military satellites for the Russian Ministry of Defense. Read our full story. [July 10]
July 5, 2019Soyuz • Meteor M2-2
Launch time: 0541:46 GMT (1:41:46 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian Soyuz rocket launched with the Russian Meteor M2-2 polar-orbiting weather satellite, and 32 small satellites on a rideshare flight arranged by GK Launch Services, Exolaunch and the Russian government. Delayed from Dec. 6, March and June 27. Read our full story. [July 5]
June 29, 2019Electron • “Make it Rain”
Launch time: 0430 GMT (12:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its seventh flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed multiple small satellites into orbit on a rideshare mission arranged by Spaceflight. The payloads included the BlackSky Global 3 commercial Earth observation satellite, two Prometheus nanosatellites for U.S. Special Operations Command, the ACRUX 1 technology demonstration CubeSat for Melbourne Space Program in Australia, and two SpaceBEE data relay satellites for Swarm Technologies. The mission was nicknamed “Make it Rain” due to the wet weather common in Seattle, the location of Spaceflight’s headquarters. Scrubbed on June 27 for additional checks on ground equipment. Delayed from June 28. Read our full story. [June 29]
June 25, 2019Falcon Heavy • STP-2
Launch time: 0630 GMT (2:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched the U.S. Air Force’s Space Test Program-2 mission with a cluster of two dozen military and scientific research satellites. The heavy-lift rocket is formed of three Falcon 9 rocket cores strapped together with 27 Merlin 1D engines firing at liftoff. Delayed from October 2016, March 2017 and September 2017. Delayed from April 30, June 13, Oct. 30 and Nov. 30. Delayed from April and June 22. The Falcon Heavy’s two side boosters returned to successful landings at Cape Canaveral, and the core stage crashed during a landing attempt on an offshore drone ship. Read our full story. [June 25]
June 24, 2019Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 1809 GMT (2:09 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched a satellite for the country’s Beidou navigation network. The spacecraft will operate in an inclined geosynchronous orbit. Read our full story. [June 24]
June 20, 2019Ariane 5 • AT&T T-16 & Eutelsat 7C
Launch time: 2143 GMT (5:43 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA248, to launch the AT&T T-16 and Eutelsat 7C communications satellites. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, the AT&T T-16, or DirecTV 16, spacecraft will provide direct-to-home television broadcasting services over the United States for DirecTV, a subsidiary of AT&T. The Eutelsat 7C satellite, built by SSL, will provide video and television broadcast services over Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Turkey. Delayed from May 10, June 5 and June 12. Read our full story. [June 20]
June 12, 2019Falcon 9 • Radarsat Constellation Mission
Launch time: 1417:10 GMT (10:17:10 a.m. EDT; 7:17:10 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Radarsat Constellation Mission for the Canadian Space Agency and MDA. Consisting of three radar Earth observation spacecraft launching on a single rocket, the Radarsat Constellation Mission is the next in a series of Canadian Radarsat satellites supporting all-weather maritime surveillance, disaster management and ecosystem monitoring for the Canadian government and international users. Delayed from November Feb. 18, March, May 16 and June 11. Read our full story. [June 12]
June 5, 2019Long March 11 • Multi-payload
Launch time: 0406 GMT (12:06 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Yellow Sea
A Chinese Long March 11 rocket launched a Jilin 1 Earth-imaging satellite for Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd, the Bufeng 1A and Bufeng 1B satellites to measure maritime wind speeds, and several secondary payloads into orbit. The solid-fueled Long March 11 rocket took off from an ocean platform in the Yellow Sea on China’s first sea-based orbital launch attempt. Read our full story. [June 5]
May 30, 2019Proton • Yamal 601
Launch time: 1742 GMT (1:42 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage launched the Yamal 601 communications satellite for Gazprom Space Systems. Built by Thales Alenia Space, Yamal 601 will provide video, data and broadband services across Russia, Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia. Moved forward from May 31. Delayed from May 29. Read our full story. [May 30]
May 27, 2019Soyuz • Glonass M
Launch time: 0623 GMT (2:23 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched a Glonass M navigation satellite. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from May 13. Delayed from May 13. Read our full story. [May 27]
May 23/24, 2019Falcon 9 • Starlink 0.9
Launch time: 0230 GMT on 24th (10:30 p.m. EDT on 23rd/24th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network. Scrubbed on May 15 and May 16. Read our full story. [May 24]
May 22, 2019Long March 4C • Yaogan 33
Launch time: 2249 GMT (6:49 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4C rocket failed during the launch of the Yaogan 33 military reconnaissance satellite. Read our full story. [May 22]
May 21/22, 2019PSLV • RISAT 2B
Launch time: 0000 GMT on 22nd (8:00 p.m. EDT on 21st)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C46, launched the RISAT 2B radar Earth observation satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. The mission used the “Core Alone” version of the PSLV with no strap-on solid rocket boosters. Read our full story. [May 22]
May 17, 2019Long March 3C • Beidou
Launch time: 1548 GMT (11:48 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3C rocket launched a satellite for the country’s Beidou navigation network toward geostationary orbit. Read our full story. [May 17]
May 5, 2019Electron • STP-27RD
Launch time: 0600 GMT (2:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its sixth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed three small satellites into orbit through the U.S. Air Force’s Rapid Agile Launch Initiative, or RALI, program on a mission designated STP-27RD. The Harbinger small satellite built by York Space Systems will demonstrate commercial spacecraft capabilities for the U.S. Army, the Space Plug and Play Architecture Research CubeSat-1 (SPARC-1) spacecraft, developed jointly with Sweden, will demonstrate avionics, software defined radio and space situational awareness technologies for the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Falcon Orbital Debris Experiment from the U.S. Air Force Academy will evaluate ground-based tracking of space objects. Delayed from late April. Scrubbed on May 4 to conduct additional payload checks. Read our full story. [May 5]
May 4, 2019Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 17
Launch time: 0648:58 GMT (2:48:58 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the 19th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 17th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. The Falcon 9’s first stage returned to landing on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Nov. 16, Feb. 1, Feb. 17, March 16, April 25, April 26 and May 1. Scrubbed on May 3 by drone ship electrical issue. Read our full story. [May 4]
April 29, 2019Long March 4B • Tianhui 2-01
Launch time: 2252 GMT (6:52 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket launched two Tianhui satellites to conduct land surveys, mapping and scientific experiments in space. Read our full story. [April 29]
April 20, 2019Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: 1441 GMT (10:41 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched a satellite for the country’s Beidou navigation network toward an inclined geosynchronous orbit. Read our full story. [April 17]
April 17, 2019Antares • NG-11
Launch time: 2046:07 GMT (4:46:07 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launched the 12th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 11th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-11. The rocket flew in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Read our full story. [April 17]
April 11, 2019Falcon Heavy • Arabsat 6A
Launch time: 2235 GMT (6:35 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched the Arabsat 6A communications satellite for Arabsat of Saudi Arabia. Arabsat 6A will provide Ku-band and Ka-band communications coverage over the Middle East and North Africa regions, as well as a footprint in South Africa. Delayed from first half of 2018 and late 2018. Delayed from March, April 7 and April 9. Scrubbed on April 10. Read our full story. [April 11]
April 4, 2019Soyuz • O3b F5
Launch time: 1703:37 GMT (1:03:37 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS22, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the fifth set of four satellites for O3b Networks, which provides broadband service to developing countries. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from March 26 and March 29. Read our full story. [April 4]
April 4, 2019Soyuz • Progress 72P
Launch time: 1101:35 GMT (7:01:35 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz-2.1a rocket launched the 72nd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Feb. 7, Feb. 8 and March 28. Read our full story. [April 4]
March 31/April 1, 2019PSLV • EMISat
Launch time: 0357 GMT on April 1st (11:57 p.m. EDT on March 31st)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C45, launched the EMISat satellite, reportedly an electronic intelligence-gathering spacecraft for the Indian government. Multiple secondary payloads from international customers, including 20 Dove nanosatellites for Planet, rode piggyback on this mission. The PSLV flew in a new configuration with four strap-on solid rocket boosters. Delayed from February and March 21. Read our full story. [April 1]
March 31, 2019Long March 3B • Tianlian 2-01
Launch time: 1551 GMT (11:51 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Tianlian 2-01 tracking and data relay satellite to support the country’s human space program. Read our full story. [March 31]
March 28, 2019Electron • R3D2
Launch time: 2327 GMT (7:27 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched on its fifth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The Electron rocket and its Curie upper stage placed the Radio Frequency Risk Reduction Deployment Demonstration spacecraft into orbit for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, a research and development agency in the U.S. Defense Department. The R3D2 satellite will demonstrate the performance of a prototype reflect array antenna for use in small spacecraft. Delayed from late February and March 16. Scrubbed on March 24 by video transmitter issue. Delayed from March 26 and March 27. Read our full story. [March 28]
March 27, 2019OS-M1 • Lingque 1B
Launch time: 0939 GMT (5:39 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
The commercial Chinese space company OneSpace launched its OS-M1 rocket on an inaugural orbital test flight with the Lingque 1B remote sensing CubeSat for ZeroG Lab, which is seeking to deploy a fleet of Earth-observing nanosatellites. The mission failed to achieve orbit after the launcher lost control during the second stage of flight. Delayed from March 25. Read our full story. [March 27]
March 21/22, 2019Vega • PRISMA
Launch time: 0150:35 GMT on 22nd (8:50:35 p.m. EDT on 21st)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV14, launched with the PRISMA satellite for the Italian space agency — ASI. PRISMA is an Earth observation satellite fitted with an innovative electro-optical instrument, combining a hyperspectral sensor with a medium-resolution panchromatic camera. The mission will support environmental monitoring and security applications. Delayed from November and December 2018, March 9 and March 14. Read our full story. [March 22]
March 15/16, 2019Delta 4 • WGS 10
Launch time: 0026 GMT on 16th (8:26 p.m. EDT on 15th)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket launched the 10th Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket flew in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Nov. 1, Dec. 13, Jan. 23, Jan. 25 and March 13. Read our full story. [March 15]
March 14, 2019Soyuz • ISS 58S
Launch time: 1914:08 GMT (3:14:08 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Moved forward from April 5. Read our full story. [March 14]
March 9, 2019Long March 3B • Chinasat 6C
Launch time: 1628 GMT (11:28 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Zhongxing 6C, or Chinasat 6C, communications satellite. Read our full story. [March 9]
March 2, 2019Falcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 1
Launch time: 0749:03 GMT (2:49:03 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on an uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. Delayed from December 2016, May 2017, July 2017, August 2017, November 2017, February 2018, April 2018, August 2018, November 2018 and December 2018. Delayed from Jan. 7, Jan. 17, Feb. 9, Feb. 16 and Feb. 23. Read our full story. [March 2]
Feb. 27, 2019Soyuz • OneWeb Pilot
Launch time: 2137 GMT (4:37 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS21, launched on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz carried the first six satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket used a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from late 2018, Feb. 19 and Feb. 22. Delayed from Feb. 26 to examine results of EgyptSat-A launch. Read our full story. [Feb. 27]
Feb. 21/22, 2019Falcon 9 • Nusantara Satu, Beresheet & S5
Launch time: 0145 GMT on 22nd (8:45 p.m. EST on 21st)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Nusantara Satu communications satellite, formerly known as PSN 6, SpaceIL’s lunar lander, named Beresheet, and the Air Force Research Laboratory’s S5 space situational awareness satellite. Built by SSL and owned by Indonesia’s PT Pasifik Satelit Nusantara, Nusantara Satu will provide voice and data communications, broadband Internet, and video distribution throughout the Indonesian archipelago. A privately-funded lunar lander developed by Israel’s SpaceIL rode piggyback on this launch, along with the Air Force Research Laboratory’s S5 payload, under a rideshare arrangement to geostationary transfer orbit and geostationary orbit provided by Spaceflight. Delayed from January, Feb. 13 and Feb. 18. Read our full story. [Feb. 21]
Feb. 21, 2019Soyuz • EgyptSat-A
Launch time: 1647 GMT (11:47 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the EgyptSat-A Earth observation satellite. EgyptSat-A was built by RSC Energia for Egypt’s National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences. Delayed from Nov. 22, Dec. 27 and Feb. 7. Read our full story. [Feb. 21]
Feb. 5, 2019Safir • Dousti
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Semnan, Iran
An Iranian Safir rocket failed in an attempt to launch the Dousti remote sensing satellite. Read our full story. [Feb. 5]
Feb. 5, 2019Ariane 5 • Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 & GSAT 31
Launch time: 2101 GMT (4:01 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA247, to launch the HellasSat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 and GSAT 11 communications satellites. Built by Lockheed Martin, the Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 satellite will provide telecommunications and broadband services in Saudi Arabia, other parts of the Middle East, Europe and North Africa. Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 is a joint mission between Hellas-Sat, a subsidiary of Arabsat based in Cyprus, and Saudi Arabia’s King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. The GSAT 31 satellite, built and owned by the Indian Space Research Organization, will provide communications coverage over India, replacing the aging Insat 4CR spacecraft. Delayed from Jan. 23. Read our full story. [Feb. 5]
Jan. 24, 2019PSLV • Microsat-R & Kalamsat
Launch time: 1807 GMT (1:07 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C44, launched the Microsat-R imaging satellite and the Kalamsat student payload into low Earth orbit. ISRO debuted a new version of the PSLV, named the PSLV-DL, with two strap-on solid rocket boosters. The fourth stage of the rocket carried the battery-powered Kalamsat student-built payload to demonstrate the use of the PSLV upper stage as a long-lived experiment platform. Read our full story. [Jan. 24]
Jan. 21, 2019Long March 11 • Jilin 1
Launch time: 0542 GMT (12:42 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 11 rocket launched two hyperspectral imaging satellites for Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd., plus two secondary smallsat payloads. Read our full story. [Jan. 21]
Jan. 19, 2019Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71
Launch time: 1910 GMT (2:10 p.m. EST; 11:10 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket launched a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. Scrubbed on Dec. 8 at T-minus 7.5 seconds. Scrubbed on Dec. 18 by high ground winds. Scrubbed Dec. 19 after the detection of elevated hydrogen in one of the rocket’s engine compartments. Delayed from Dec. 30. Delayed from Jan. 6. Read our full story. [Jan. 19]
Jan. 17/18, 2019Epsilon • RAPIS 1
Launch time: 0050:20 GMT on 18th (7:50:20 p.m. EST on 17th))
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s Epsilon rocket launched the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Rapid Innovative Payload Demonstration Satellite 1, or RAPIS 1, along with six Japanese and Vietnamese secondary payloads on a rideshare mission. Delayed from Jan. 17. Read our full story. [Jan. 18]
Jan. 14/15, 2019Simorgh • Payam-e Amirkabir
Launch time: 0030 GMT on 15th (7:30 p.m. EST on 14th)
Launch site:
Imam Khomeini Spaceport, Semnan, Iran
An Iranian Simorgh rocket failed to place the Payam-e Amirkabir Earth observation satellite into orbit. Read our full story. [Jan. 15]
Jan. 11, 2019Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 66-75
Launch time: 1531:33 GMT (10:31:33 a.m. EST; 7:31:33 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from October, November and Dec. 30. Delayed from Jan. 7 and Jan. 8. Read our full story. [Jan. 11]
Jan. 10, 2019Long March 3B • Chinasat 2D
Launch time: 1711 GMT (12:11 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched the Zhongxing 2D, or Chinasat 2D, communications satellite. Read our full story. [Jan. 10]
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!