September 22, 2021

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Sept. 20: Atlas 5/Landsat 9 delayed; Adding time for Soyuz 65S; Adding date for Soyuz/OneWeb 11; Adding KSLV 2/Test Flight; Updating launch site for Soyuz/OneWeb 12; Adding date and time for Soyuz/Galileo 27 & 28; Falcon 9/IXPE delayed
Sept. 12: Adding time for Falcon 9/Starlink 2-1; Updating window for Falcon 9/Inspiration4
Sept. 10: Adding date for Falcon 9/Starlink 2-1; Adding time for Soyuz/OneWeb 10; Falcon 9/Inspiration4 delayed; Electron/BlackSky 10 & 11 delayed; Electron/BlackSky 12 & 13 delayed; Electron/BlackSky 14 & 15 delayed; Ariane 5/SES 17 & Syracuse 4A delayed; Adding date for Ariane 5/JWST; Adding Ariane 5/MEASAT 3d & GSAT 24
Aug. 31: Electron/BlackSky 10 & 11 delayed; Adding Alpha/DREAM
Aug. 27: Astra Rocket 3.3/STP-27AD1 scrubbed; Falcon 9/SpaceX CRS 23 scrubbed; Adding date for Soyuz/OneWeb 10; Atlas 5/Landsat 9 delayed

Sept. 27Atlas 5 • Landsat 9
Launch time: 1811 GMT (2:11 p.m. EDT; 11:11 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the Landsat 9 Earth observation satellite for NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. Built by Northrop Grumman, Landsat 9 will continue the series of Landsat images of Earth dating back nearly 50 years. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters, and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Sept. 16 by liquid oxygen shortage. Delayed from Sept. 23. [Sept. 20]
Sept. 30/Oct. 1Epsilon • RAISE 2
Launch time: 0048-0059 GMT on 1st (8:48-8:59 p.m. EDT on 30th)
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
A Japanese Epsilon rocket will launch the Rapid Innovative Payload Demonstration Satellite 2, or RAISE 2, technology demonstration satellite for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Eight smaller rideshare payloads will also be on this launch. [Aug. 23]
NET OctoberElectron • BlackSky 10 & 11
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1A, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch two small satellites for BlackSky’s commercial fleet of Earth observation spacecraft. Rocket Lab has nicknamed this mission “Love At First Insight.” Delayed from late August and September. [Sept. 10]
Oct. 5Soyuz • ISS 65S
Launch time: 0855 GMT (4:55 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft to the International Space Station with cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, film director Klim Shipenko, and actress Yulia Peresild. Shkaplerov will remain on the ISS for a long-duration expedition, while Shipenko and Peresild will spend about 12 days before returning on a different Soyuz spacecraft. The Soyuz MS-19 capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Delayed from Sept. 22. [Sept. 20]
Oct. 14Soyuz • OneWeb 11
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch 36 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Sept. 18. [Sept. 20]
OctoberLong March 2F • Shenzhou 13
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2F rocket will launch the Shenzhou 13 spacecraft with three Chinese astronauts to rendezvous and dock with the Chinese space station in low Earth orbit. This is China’s eighth crewed space mission, and the second to the Chinese space station. [June 18]
NET OctoberElectron • BlackSky 12 & 13
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1A, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch two small second-generation satellites for BlackSky’s commercial fleet of Earth observation spacecraft. Delayed from September. [Sept. 10]
OctoberFalcon Heavy • USSF 44
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 44 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The mission is expected to deploy two spacecraft payloads directly into geosynchronous orbit, one of which is the military’s TETRA 1 microsatellite. Delayed from late 2020, 2nd quarter of 2021, and July 2021. [June 7]
Oct. 16Atlas 5 • Lucy
Launch time: 0934 GMT (5:34 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch NASA’s Lucy spacecraft. Built by Lockheed Martin and led by the Southwest Research Institute, Lucy will fly by seven Trojan asteroids, a unique family of asteroids that orbit the sun in front of and behind Jupiter. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters, and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [Feb. 23]
Oct. 21KSLV 2 • Test Flight
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Naro Space Center, South Korea
A South Korean KSLV 2 rocket will launch on its first orbital launch attempt. The Korea Space Launch Vehicle 2, or Nuri, rocket was developed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute. The first KSLV 2 mission will carry a dummy payload. [Sept. 20]
TBDFalcon 9 • Starlink
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a group of Starlink internet satellites. Delayed from mid-August. [Aug. 5]
4th QuarterElectron • CAPSTONE
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1A, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its second mission from a new launch pad at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia. The Electron rocket will carry NASA’s Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment, or CAPSTONE, mission to the moon. CAPSTONE will fly to the moon on Rocket Lab’s Photon space tug, entering a unique halo-like lunar orbit to test deep space navigation and communications in the same orbit to be used by NASA’s Gateway mini-space station. Moved from Launch Complex 2 in Virginia to Launch Complex 1A in New Zealand. [Aug. 23]
4th QuarterVega • CERES
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV20, will launch three CERES signals intelligence satellites for the French military. The three small satellites were built by Airbus Defense and Space and Thales Alenia Space. [May 13]
Oct. 22Ariane 5 • SES 17 & Syracuse 4A
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA255, to launch the SES 17 and Syracuse 4A communications satellites. Built Thales Alenia Space, the SES 17 communications satellite will provide internet connectivity to airline passengers over the Americas, the Caribbean, and the Atlantic Ocean for SES of Luxembourg. The Syracuse 4A spacecraft, also built by Thales Alenia Space, will provide communications services for the French military. [Sept. 10]
Oct. 24/25H-2A • QZS 1R
Launch window: 0200-0300 GMT on 25th (10:00-11:00 p.m. EDT on 24th)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket will launch a replacement satellite for Japan’s Quasi-Zenith Satellite System, which provides regional navigation services over the Asia-Pacific Region. The QZS 1R satellite, built by Mitsubishi Electric Corp., will replace the aging QZS 1 satellite launched in 2010. [Sept. 10]
Oct. 28Soyuz • Progress 79P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 79th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Delayed from Aug. 21. [March 31]
NET OctoberElectron • BlackSky 14 & 15
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1A, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch two small second-generation satellites for BlackSky’s commercial fleet of Earth observation spacecraft. Delayed from September. [Sept. 10]
Oct. 31Falcon 9 • Crew 3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its third operational flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Raja Chari and Thomas Marshburn, and European Space Agency astronaut Matthias Maurer will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft. A fourth crew member will be assigned at a later date. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from Sept. 13 and Oct. 23. [July 27]
TBDAtlas 5 • STP-3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the STP-3 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The STP-3 rideshare mission will launch the STPSat 6 satellite and several small satellites. STPSat 6 hosts several payloads and experiments, including the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Space and Atmospheric Burst Reporting System-3 (SABRS-3) payload, and NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) experiment. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters, and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Feb. 26, June 23, and early September. [Aug. 15]
TBDAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-082, will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on second unpiloted test flight to the International Space Station. This mission was added after Boeing’s decision to refly the Starliner’s Orbital Flight Test before proceeding with the Crew Flight Test. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from 3rd Quarter. Delayed from Jan. 4. Moved forward from March 29, April 2, and May. Delayed from July 30 and Aug. 3. [Aug. 15]
TBDAtlas 5 • USSF 8 (GSSAP 5 & 6)
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the USSF 8 mission with the fifth and sixth satellites for the Space Force’s Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program, or GSSAP, designed to help the military track and observe objects in geosynchronous orbit. The rocket will fly in the 511 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, one solid rocket booster and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from 4th Quarter of 2020, March, August, and early September. [July 13]
Nov. 22/23Soyuz • Galileo 27 & 28
Launch time: 0107:49 GMT on 23rd (8:07:49 p.m. EST on 22nd)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designed VS26, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry two Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. The Soyuz-2.1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from mid-2021 and September. [Sept. 20]
4th QuarterFalcon 9 • Turksat 5B
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Turksat 5B communications satellite for Turksat, a Turkish satellite operator. Built by Airbus Defense and Space with significant Turkish contributions, the Turksat 5B satellite will provide broadband services over a wide coverage area, including Turkey, the Middle East and large regions of Africa. Delayed from June. [April 15]
Nov. 23/24Falcon 9 • DART
Launch time: 0658 GMT (1:58 a.m. EST; 10:58 p.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, mission. DART is NASA’s first flight demonstration for planetary defense. The mission seeks to test and validate a method to protect Earth in case of an asteroid impact threat. The mission aims to shift an asteroid’s orbit through kinetic impact — specifically, by impacting a spacecraft into the smaller member of the binary asteroid system Didymos to change its orbital speed. Delayed from July. [July 27]
Dec. 4Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 24
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon 2 spacecraft on its fourth cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The flight is the 24th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. [April 12]
Dec. 8Soyuz • ISS 66S
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft to the International Space Station on a 12-day flight with cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin and space tourists Yusaku Maezawa and Yozo Hirano. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Delayed from Sept. 22. [June 7]
Dec. 13Falcon 9 • IXPE
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer. IXPE exploits the polarization state of light from astrophysical sources to provide insight into our understanding of X-ray production in objects such as neutron stars and pulsar wind nebulae, as well as stellar and supermassive black holes. Delayed from Nov. 17. [Sept. 20]
DecemberFalcon 9 • Transporter 3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Transporter 3 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with numerous small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. [Aug. 23]
Dec. 18Ariane 5 • James Webb Space Telescope
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace used an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA256, to launch the James Webb Space Telescope, a flagship observatory developed by NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Canadian Space Agency. JWST is the largest space telescope ever built, with a deployable mirror measuring 21.3 feet (6.5 meters) in diameter and four scientific instruments to observe the universe in infrared wavelengths. The mission will study the formation of galaxies, stars, and planets. The Ariane 5 ECA rocket will launch JWST on a trajectory toward its operating position at the L2 Lagrange point nearly a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) from Earth. Delayed from Oct. 31 and November. [Sept. 10]
DecemberSoyuz • OneWeb 12
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch 34 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. [Sept. 20]
4th QuarterSSLV • Demonstration Launch
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its first orbital test flight. Consisting of three solid-fueled stages and a liquid-fueled upper stage, the SSLV is a new Indian launch vehicle designed to carry small satellites into low Earth orbit. Delayed from September and December 2019. Delayed from January and December 2020. Delayed from April. [March 31]
4th QuarterSSLV • BlackSky Global
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its first commercial mission with four Earth observation satellites for BlackSky Global, a Seattle-based company. The rideshare mission for BlackSky is being arranged by Spaceflight. Delayed from November, late 2019 and early 2020. Delayed from early 2021 and July. [March 31]
TBDPSLV • RISAT 1A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C52, will launch the Indian RISAT 1A radar Earth observation satellite. [March 12]
Jan. 8Atlas 5 • GOES-T
Launch time: 2133-2333 GMT (4:33-6:33 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch GOES-T, the third next-generation geostationary weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. GOES-T will orbit 22,300 miles above the equator to monitor weather conditions across the United States. The rocket will fly in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 7. [Aug. 5]
Early 2022Falcon Heavy • USSF 52
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 52 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The mission will launch an unspecified military payload on this mission. Delayed from October. [June 7]
Early 2022Vulcan Centaur • Peregrine
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket will launch on its inaugural flight with the Peregrine commercial lunar lander for Astrobotic. The Peregrine robotic lander will carry multiple experiments, scientific instruments, and tech demo payloads for NASA and other customers. The Vulcan Centaur rocket will fly in the VC2S configuration with two GEM-63XL solid rocket boosters, a short-length payload fairing, and two RL10 engines on the Centaur upper stage. [July 13]
Early 2022Vega C • LARES 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega C rocket will launch the LARES 2 satellite for ASI, the Italian space agency. The spherical LARES 2 satellite is covered in laser mirrors to enable precise tracking from the ground, enabling research into geoodynamics and general relativity. This will mark the inaugural flight of Europe’s new Vega C rocket, featuring a more powerful first stage motor, an enlarged second stage, an improved liquid-fueled upper stage, and a new payload fairing design. Delayed from mid-2020 by coronavirus impacts. Delayed from December and early 2021. [May 13]
Early 2022Ariane 5 • MEASAT 3d & GSAT 24
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA257, to launch the MEASAT 3d and GSAT 24 communications satellites. Built by Airbus Defense and Space for MEASAT, a Malaysian operator, MEASAT 3d is a multi-mission communications satellite outfitted with C-band, Ku-band, and Ka-band payloads for direct-to-home TV broadcasting and internet services over Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. GSAT 24 is a direct-to-home TV broadcasting satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. [Sept. 10]
NET MarchFalcon 9 • WorldView Legion 1 & 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first two WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. Maxar plans to deploy six commercial WorldView Legion high-resolution remote sensing satellites into a mix of sun-synchronous and mid-inclination orbits on two SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. Delayed from January and September 2021. [Aug. 23]
TBDAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crew Test Flight, to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore, Mike Fincke and Nicole Mann will fly on the Crew Flight Test. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August and 1st Quarter of 2020. Delayed from mid-2020 after Boeing decision to refly the Orbital Flight Test. Delayed from early 2021, June 2021, and late 2021. [Aug. 15]
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