A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

June 19 Falcon 9 • Astra 1P
Launch time: 5:35 p.m. EDT (2135 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch Astra 1P, a wide-beam satellite, into geostationary Earth orbit for Luxembourg-based SES. The Ku-band satellite, also known as SES-24, will operate at the 19.2° East position. It’s designed to provide television transmission services for about 119 million homes across Europe, specifically in France, Germany and Spain. Following stage separation, the Falcon 9 first stage booster will land on the droneship, ‘Just Read the Instructions.’ Delayed from June 18 due to poor weather.

Updated: June 19

NET June 20/21 Electron • “No Time Toulouse”
Launch time: 6:13 a.m. NZT on June 21 (2:13 p.m. EDT, 1813 UTC on June 20)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch the “No Time Toulouse” mission, the first of five dedicated flights on behalf of Kinéis, a French Internet-of-Things company, which also has financial backing from France’s space agency, CNES (Centre National d’Études Spatiales). The rocket will carry the first five Internet-of-Things (IOT) satellites of a 25-satellite constellation. Delayed from June 19 due to weather.

Updated: June 17

June 23 Falcon 9 • Starlink 10-2
Launch time: Window opens at 1:03 p.m. EDT (1703 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a batch of Starlink V2 Mini satellites to low Earth orbit. About 8.5 minutes after liftoff, the first stage booster will land on a droneship out in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from June 12. Delayed from June 13 due to the weather. Delayed from June 14 due to T-0 abort.

Updated: June 20

June 24 Long March 2C • SVOM
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: Xichang Satellite Launch Center, People's Republic of China

A Chinese Long March 2C rocket will launch the Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) spacecraft. The satellite is a dual Franco-Chinese mission, which is “dedicated to the study of the most distant explosions of stars, the gamma-ray bursts.”  There are four main instruments on board, two of which are French and two which are Chinese. The spacecraft will be launched to a 625-km Earth orbit and will operate for at least three years with an option to extend for another two years beyond that. Delayed from late 2023.

Updated: January 28

June 25 Falcon Heavy • GOES U
Launch time: 5:16 p.m. EDT (2116 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy will launch the fourth and final satellite of the next-generation series of geostationary weather satellites for NASA and NOAA. GOES-U will orbit 22,300 miles above the equator to monitor weather conditions across the United States. The satellite will be renamed GOES-19 once it reaches its operational orbit. Delayed from April 30 and May.

Updated: June 17

Summer 2024 Falcon 9 • ASBM
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission, consisting of two satellites owned by Space Norway. The Falcon 9 will launch the two Northrop Grumman-built satellites into a highly elliptical orbit that lingers over the Arctic region. The satellites carry communications payloads for the Norwegian Ministry of Defense, the U.S. Space Force, and Inmarsat.

Updated: December 13

TBD Eris • TestFlight1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: Pad 1, Bowen Orbital Spaceport

Gilmour Space in Australia is preparing to launch the inaugural flight of its Eris Block 1 rocket. The three-stage launch vehicle is 25 m (82 ft) tall and is equipped with 1.5 m (4.9 ft) diameter payload fairings. The rocket is designed to send up to 305 kg up to low Earth orbit. This first mission, called “TestFlight1,” does not appear to have a payload on board. Delayed from May 4 due to a lack of launch permit.

Updated: May 28

NET June Soyuz • Kondor-FKA 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: Pad 1S, Vostochny Cosmodrome

A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Kondor-Experimental SAR Spacecraft FKA 2 (Kondor-FKA 2) satellite to sun-synchronous orbit at 510 km altitude and an inclination of 97.4°. The mission, with a roughly five-year live span, is being launched on behalf of NPO Mashinostroyeniya.

Updated: June 10

June 29/30 H3 • DAICHI-4
Launch time: 12:06:42 - 12:19:34 p.m. JST (11:06:42 - 11:19:34 p.m. EDT, 0306:42-0319:34 UTC)
Launch site: Yoshinobu Launch Complex at the JAXA Tanegashima Space Center

The Japanese Exploration Aerospace Agency (JAXA) will launch the third flight of its H3 Launch Vehicle. The mission, H3 F3: Flight No. 3, will launch the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-4 “DAICHI-4” (ALOS-4). This Earth observation satellite is manufactured by Mitsubishi Electric Corporation will use a phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR-3) and is designed to operate for seven years or orbit.

Updated: April 26

NET July Falcon 9 • Transporter-11
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch dozens of satellites to a sun-synchronous orbit on the company’s 11th such rideshare mission. Among the payloads are the European Space Agency’s Arctic Weather Satellite, UK-based Surrey Satellites’ Tyche satellite for the UK Space Command, Japan-based iQPS’ QPS-SAR No. 8 satellite and U.S.-based Planet Labs’ Tanager-1 satellite.

Updated: June 17

NET July 7/8 Falcon 9 • Türksat 6A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Türksat 6A communications satellite for the Turkish operator Türksat. Türksat 6A is the first geostationary communications satellite to be built in Turkey, with development led by TÜBİTAK Space Technologies Research Institute and Turkish Aerospace Industries. It will operate at the 42° East orbital position. Delayed from 2nd Quarter 2023 and March 2024.

Updated: June 17

NET July Atlas 5 • USSF 51
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-101, will launch the USSF 51 mission for the U.S. Space Force. This mission will launch an undisclosed payload for the military.

Updated: June 17

NET July Falcon 9 • Polaris Dawn
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft. The Polaris Dawn mission will be commanded by billionaire Jared Isaacman, making his second trip to space. He will be joined on the all-private mission by pilot Scott “Kidd” Poteet, and SpaceX employees Sarah Gillis and Anna Menon. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from November and December 2022, March 2023, April 2024 and early summer 2024.

Updated: June 07

NET July 15 Falcon 9 • WorldView Legion 3 & 4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the second pair of WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. Maxar plans to deploy six commercial WorldView Legion high-resolution remote sensing satellites into a mix of sun-synchronous and mid-inclination orbits on three SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets.

Updated: June 17

3rd Quarter Falcon 9 • BlueBird Block 1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch five 700-square-foot Block 1 BlueBird satellites on behalf of its customer, AST SpaceMobile, Inc.

Updated: April 02

3rd quarter Vulcan Centaur • Dream Chaser 1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket will launch on its second demonstration flight with Sierra Space’s Dream Chaser cargo vehicle for the International Space Station. The Dream Chaser is a lifting body resupply spacecraft that will launch on top of a rocket and land on a runway. This will be the Dream Chaser’s first flight to space. The Vulcan Centaur rocket will fly in the VC4L configuration with four GEM-63XL solid rocket boosters, a long-length payload fairing, and two RL10 engines on the Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August 2022, December 2023, January 2024 and April 2024.

Updated: June 18