August 17, 2018

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Aug. 17: Falcon 9/Telstar 18 VANTAGE delayed
Aug. 15: Adding Long March/Beidou; Updating window for Delta 2/ICESat 2; Adding date for PSLV/NovaSAR-S & SSTL-S1; Adding date for Falcon 9/SAOCOM 1A; Adding PSLV/HySIS; Falcon 9/GPS 3-01 delayed; Updating timeframe for Falcon 9/Iridium Next 66-75; GSLV Mk.3/Chandrayaan 2 delayed; Adding Soyuz/EgyptSat-A; Adding Soyuz/Meteor M2-2; Adding date for Soyuz/CSG 1 & CHEOPS
Aug. 14: Updating time for Vega/Aeolus; Ariane 5/Horizons 3e & Azerspace 2/Intelsat 38 delayed
Aug. 11: Delta 4-Heavy/Parker Solar Probe scrubbed
Aug. 9: Adding timeframes for Electron/It’s Business Time and Electron/VCLS 1; Updating launch window for Delta 4-Heavy/Parker Solar Probe; Falcon 9/Telstar 18 VANTAGE delayed; Falcon 9/Spaceflight SSO-A delayed; Falcon 9/Crew Dragon Demo 1 delayed
Aug. 2: Falcon 9/Es’hail 2 delayed; Delta 2/ICESat 2 delayed
July 31: Falcon 9/Merah Putih delayed
July 27: Adding Long March 3B/Beidou; Long March 2C/CFOSAT delayed; Adding PSLV/NovaSAR-S & SSTL-S1; Soyuz 57S delayed; Adding Soyuz/CSG 1 & CHEOPS; Adding Soyuz 58S; Adding Antares/NG-11, Adding Falcon 9/SpaceX CRS 18
July 24: Falcon 9/Merah Putih delayed; Delta 4-Heavy/Parker Solar Probe delayed
July 19: Delta 4-Heavy/Parker Solar Probe delayed; Adding window for Falcon 9/Telstar 18 VANTAGE; Adding Electron/VCLS 1; Falcon 9/Crew Dragon Demo 1 delayed; Adding time for H-2B/HTV 7; Adding date and window for Pegasus XL/ICON; Adding time for Atlas 5/AEHF 4; Falcon Heavy/STP-2 delayed

Aug. 21Vega • Aeolus
Launch time: 2120:09 GMT (5:20:09 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV12, will launch with the Aeolus satellite for the European Space Agency. ADM-Aeolus will be the first ever satellite to deliver wind profiles on a global scale and on a daily basis. Delayed from November, Jan. 20 and mid-2018. [Aug. 14]
NET Aug. 25/26Falcon 9 • Telstar 18 VANTAGE
Launch window: 0333-0733 GMT on 26th (11:33 p.m.-3:33 a.m. EDT on 25th/26th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Telstar 18 VANTAGE communications satellite for Telesat. The Telstar 18 VANTAGE satellite will provide broadcast, enterprise and government communications services over parts of India, China, Mongolia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Ocean region. APT Satellite of Hong Kong has an agreement to use capacity on Telstar 18V, which is also known as Apstar 5C. The satellite was built SSL. Delayed from July, Aug. 17 and Aug. 23. [Aug. 17]
NET AugustLong March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket with a Yuanzheng upper stage will launch two satellites for the country’s Beidou navigation network into Medium Earth Orbit. [Aug. 15]
Sept. 7Ariane 5 • Horizons 3e & Azerspace 2/Intelsat 38
Launch window: 2156-2231 GMT (5:56-6:31 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA243, to launch the Horizons 3e and Azerspace 2/Intelsat 38 communications satellites. The Horizons 3e high-throughput satellite is owned by the Horizons joint venture between Intelsat and the Japanese operator Sky Perfect JSAT Corp. Horizons 3e was built by Boeing and will provide aeronautical and maritime mobility services and support government networking applications in the Asia-Pacific region and in North America. Built by Space Systems/Loral, the Azerspace 2/Intelsat 38 spacecraft will be the second satellite owned by Azercosmos, the national satellite operator of Azerbaijan, which will use the new platform to support growing demands in the region for direct-to-home television, government and network services. For Intelsat, the satellite will replace the Intelsat 12 spacecraft offering direct-to-home television and network services over Africa, Central and Eastern Europe, and Asia. Delayed from April and May 18. Delayed from May 25 to conduct additional checks on the GSAT 11 spacecraft, which was removed from the mission and replaced with Horizons 3e. Delayed from Sept. 5. [Aug. 14]
Sept. 10H-2B • HTV 7
Launch time: 2232 GMT (6:32 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket will launch the seventh H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an unmanned cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. Delayed from Aug. 16. [July 19]
Sept. 15Delta 2 • ICESat 2
Launch window: 1246-1326 GMT (8:46-9:26 a.m. EDT; 5:46-6:26 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-2W, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket will launch NASA ICESat 2 satellite to continue the important observations of ice-sheet elevation change, sea-ice freeboard, and vegetation canopy height begun by ICESat in 2003. The rocket will fly in the 7420 configuration with four solid rocket boosters and no third stage. This will be the final launch of a Delta 2 rocket. Delayed from Sept. 12. [Aug. 15]
Sept. 15PSLV • NovaSAR-S & SSTL-S1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C42 mission, will launch the NovaSAR-S and SSTL-S1 Earth observation satellites, along with several secondary payloads. The NovaSAR-S spacecraft carries a radar imaging instrument, and the mission was developed in partnership between the British government and the British satellite manufacturer SSTL. The SSTL-S1 satellite, also built by SSTL, is a high-resolution optical Earth observation satellite identical to three DMC3/TripleSat reconnaissance craft launched in 2015. Beijing-based 21AT will lease imaging capacity on the SSTL-S1 satellite. The PSLV will fly in the PSLV XL configuration with enlarged solid rocket boosters. [Aug. 15]
NET Sept. 24Pegasus XL • ICON
Launch window: 0800-0930 GMT (4:00-5:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
L-1011, Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
An air-launched Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket will deploy NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite into orbit. ICON will study the ionosphere, a region of Earth’s upper atmosphere where terrestrial weather meets space weather. Disturbances in the ionosphere triggered by solar storms or weather activity in the lower atmosphere can cause disturbances in GPS navigation and radio transmissions. Delayed from June 15, Nov. 14, Dec. 8 and June 14. [July 19]
Sept. 26Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. [Jan. 22]
Sept. 28Falcon 9 • SAOCOM 1A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SAOCOM 1A for CONAE, Argentina’s space agency. SAOCOM 1A is the first of two SAOCOM 1-series Earth observation satellites designed to provide radar imagery to help emergency responders and monitor the environment, including the collection of soil moisture measurements. [Aug. 15]
OctoberGSLV Mk.3 • GSAT 29
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3), designated GSLV Mk.3-D2, will launch the GSAT 29 communications satellite carrying Ka-band, Ku-band and optical communications payloads. Delayed from July. [July 10]
Oct. 4/5Atlas 5 • AEHF 4
Launch time: 0307 GMT on 5th (11:07 p.m. EDT on 4th)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-073, will launch the fourth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 15, 2016. Delayed from Jan. 26, May 4, June 22, June 29 and Oct. 11, 2017. Delayed from July 2018. Moved up from Oct. 18. [July 19]
OctoberFalcon 9 • Iridium Next 66-75
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. [Aug. 15]
Oct. 11Soyuz • ISS 56S
Launch time: 0840 GMT (4:40 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Sept. 7 and Sept. 14. [June 4]
OctoberPSLV • HySIS
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, flying on the PSLV-C43 mission, will launch India’s Hyperspectral Imaging Satellite, or HySIS. A collection of small international secondary payloads will accompany HySIS on this launch. The PSLV will fly in the PSLV XL configuration with enlarged solid rocket boosters. [Aug. 15]
Oct. 18/19Ariane 5 • BepiColombo
Launch time: 0145 GMT on 19th (9:45 p.m. EDT on 18th)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket to launch the BepiColombo mission for the European Space Agency and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. BepiColombo will begin a seven-year journey to Mercury, where two spacecraft built in Europe and Japan will survey the solar system’s innermost planet’s geology, evolution and magnetic field. BepiColombo will be the third space mission to visit Mercury, and the first led by Europe. Delayed from Oct. 5. [July 3]
OctoberH-2A • GOSAT 2 & KhalifaSat
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket will launch the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite 2, or GOSAT 2, for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, the Japanese Ministry of Environment, and the National Institute of Environmental Studies. Also known as Ibuki 2, the satellite replaces the Ibuki spacecraft launched in 2009 and will measure carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide concentrations in Earth’s atmosphere, yielding data to help determine how much of the greenhouse gas emissions are attributable to human activity. The H-2A will also launch the KhalifaSat Earth-imaging satellite for the United Arab Emirates and several other secondary payloads. [May 16]
Late OctoberLong March 2C • CFOSAT
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2C rocket will launch the China-France Oceanography Satellite, or CFOSAT. CFOSAT will study ocean surface winds and waves. These data will enable more reliable sea-state forecasts and yield new insights into ocean-atmosphere interactions. Delayed from September. [July 27]
Oct. 30/31Soyuz • Progress 71P
Launch time: 0053 GMT on 31st (8:53 p.m. EDT on 30th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 71st Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [June 4]
4th QuarterFalcon 9 • Es’hail 2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Es’hail 2 communications satellite. Built by Mitsubishi Electric Corp. and owned by Qatar’s national satellite communications company Es’hailSat, Es’hail 2 will provide television broadcasts, broadband connectivity and government services to Qatar and neighboring parts of the Middle East, North Africa and Europe. Es’hail 2 also carries the first amateur radio payload to fly in geostationary orbit. Delayed from August. [Aug. 2]
Nov. 6/7Soyuz • MetOp C
Launch time: Approx. 0047 GMT on 7th (8:47 p.m. EDT on 6th)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS19, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry the MetOp C polar-orbiting weather satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, or Eumetsat. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Sept. 18. [July 3]
NovemberFalcon Heavy • STP-2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s Space Test Program-2 mission with a cluster of military and scientific research satellites. The heavy-lift rocket is formed of three Falcon 9 rocket cores strapped together with 27 Merlin 1D engines firing at liftoff. Delayed from October 2016, March 2017 and September 2017. Delayed from April 30, June 13 and Oct. 30. [July 19]
NovemberElectron • It’s Business Time
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its third flight, which Rocket Lab calls “It’s Business Time,” from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. Two commercial CubeSats for Spire Global’s weather and ship tracking constellation, and one small satellite for GeoOptics’ commercial remote sensing network will be aboard the rocket. A Curie upper stage will place the satellites into the proper orbit. Delayed from April 20. Scrubbed on June 23 and June 26. [Aug. 9]
NovemberFalcon 9 • Spaceflight SSO-A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with Spaceflight’s SSO-A rideshare mission, a stack of satellites heading into sun-synchronous polar orbit. Numerous small payloads will be launched on this mission for nearly 50 government and commercial organizations from 16 countries, including the United States, Australia, Finland, Germany, Singapore and Thailand. Delayed from July. [Aug. 9]
NovemberLong March 5 • Shijian 20
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch the Shijian 20 communications satellite. Shijian 20 is the first spacecraft based on the new DFH-5 communications satellite platform, a heavier, higher-power next-generation design, replacing the Shijian 18 satellite lost on a launch failure in 2017. [July 10]
Nov. 17Antares • NG-10
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 11th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 10th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-10. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from March and Nov. 10. [June 29]
NovemberFalcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on an uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. Delayed from December 2016, May 2017, July 2017, August 2017, November 2017, February 2018, April 2018 and August 2018. [Aug. 9]
Nov. 22Soyuz • EgyptSat-A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the EgyptSat-A Earth observation satellite. EgyptSat-A was built by RSC Energia for Egypt’s National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences. [Aug. 15]
Nov. 29Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 16
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 18th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 16th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 16. [June 29]
NovemberFalcon 9 • Radarsat Constellation Mission
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Radarsat Constellation Mission for the Canadian Space Agency and MDA. Consisting of three radar Earth observation spacecraft launching on a single rocket, the Radarsat Constellation Mission is the next in a series of Canadian Radarsat satellites supporting all-weather maritime surveillance, disaster management and ecosystem monitoring for the Canadian government and international users. [June 29]
Late 2018Long March 3B • Chang’e 4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket will launch the Chang’e 4 mission to attempt the first robotic landing on the far side of the moon. Chang’e 4 consists of a stationary lander and a mobile rover. [March 19]
DecemberFalcon 9 • GPS 3-01
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s first third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. Delayed from May 3 and late 2017. Switched from a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket. The third GPS 3-series satellite will now launch on a Delta 4. Delayed from September and October. [Aug. 15]
DecemberVega • PRISMA
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV13, will launch with the PRISMA satellite for the Italian space agency — ASI. PRISMA is an Earth observation satellite fitted with an innovative electro-optical instrument, combining a hyperspectral sensor with a medium-resolution panchromatic camera. The mission will support environmental monitoring and security applications. Delayed from November. [June 29]
Dec. 6Soyuz • Meteor M2-2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch with the Russian Meteor M2-1 polar-orbiting weather satellite. [Aug. 15]
Dec. 13Delta 4 • WGS 10
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the 10th Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Nov. 1. [May 16]
Dec. 14Soyuz • CSG 1 & CHEOPS
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS20, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry first COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation, or CSG 1, radar surveillance satellite for ASI, the Italian space agency. The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite, or CHEOPS, will fly as a secondary payload on the mission. Built by Airbus Defense and Space in Spain with a Swiss-developed science instrument, CHEOPS will observe transits of planets around other stars to measure their radii. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. [Aug. 15]
DecemberElectron • VCLS 1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its fourth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The mission will be conducted under contract to NASA’s Venture Class Launch Services Program, carrying 10 CubeSats to orbit for NASA field centers and U.S. educational institutions. Delayed from 3rd Quarter. [Aug. 9]
DecemberMinotaur 1 • NROL-111
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0B, Wallops Island, Virginia
A U.S. Air Force and Northrop Grumman Minotaur 1 rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. [June 29]
Dec. 20Soyuz • ISS 57S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Nov. 6 and Nov. 15. [July 27]
Late 2018Falcon Heavy • Arabsat 6A
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the Arabsat 6A communications satellite for Arabsat of Saudi Arabia. Arabsat 6A will provide Ku-band and Ka-band communications coverage over the Middle East and North Africa regions, as well as a footprint in South Africa. Delayed from first half of 2018. [March 2]
NET Jan. 3GSLV Mk.3 • Chandrayaan 2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) will launch the Chandrayaan 2 mission, India’s second mission to the moon. Chandrayaan 2 will consist of an orbiter, the Vikram lander and rover launched together into a high Earth orbit. The orbiter is designed to use on-board propulsion to reach the moon, then release the lander and rover. Chandrayaan 2 was originally slated to launch on a GSLV Mk.2 vehicle, but Indian officials decided to switch to a larger GSLV Mk.3 vehicle in 2018. Delayed from March, April and October 2018. [Aug. 15]
JanuaryAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-080, will launch Boeing’s first CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on an unpiloted Orbital Test Flight to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States after an orbital shakedown cruise ahead of a two-person Crew Test Flight. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 27. [Aug. 2]
Feb. 1Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 17
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 19th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 17th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 16. [July 10]
Feb. 7Soyuz • Progress 71P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 72nd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [July 10]
NET MarchFalcon 9 • GPS 3-02
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s second third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. [July 10]
April 5Soyuz • ISS 58S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. [July 27]
April 17Antares • NG-11
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 12th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 11th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-11. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. [July 27]
May 7Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 18
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 20th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 18th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. [July 27]
Mid-2019Atlas 5 • AEHF 5
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [July 10]
Late 2019Long March 5 • Chang’e 5
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch the Chang’e 5 mission to return samples from the moon. It is the first lunar sample return mission attempted since 1976. Delayed from November. [Sept. 26]
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