September 22, 2019

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Sept. 21: H-2B/HTV 8 delayed
Sept. 20: Adding date and time for Long March 3B/Beidou; Adding date for H-2B/HTV 8; Adding Long March 2D/Yunhai 1-02; Adding Soyuz/EKS 3; Updating window for Pegasus XL/ICON; Falcon 9/SAOCOM 1B delayed
Sept. 11: H-2B/HTV 8 scrubbed; Adding Long March 11/Zhuhai 1 Group 3; Adding time for Proton/Eutelsat 5 West B & MEV 1; Adding date and time for Pegasus XL/ICON; Adding date for Falcon 9/Starlink 1; Adding PSLV/RISAT 2BR1; Adding Long March 4A/CBERS 4A; Adding Falcon 9/Starlink 2; Adding Ariane 5/Inmarsat 5 F5 & TBD; Soyuz/CSG 1 & CHEOPS delayed; Adding Falcon 9/Starlink 3; Adding Falcon 9/Starlink 4; Antares/NG-13 moved forward
Aug. 29: Kuaizhou 1A/KX-09 delayed; Adding date for Proton/Eutelsat 5 West B & MEV 1
Aug. 26: Adding date for Kuaizhou 1A/KX-09; Adding date and time for Rockot/Geo-IK 2
Aug. 23: Adding Kuaizhou 1A/KX-09; Atlas 5/CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test delayed; SSLV/Demonstration Launch delayed; SSLV/BlackSky Global delayed; Falcon 9/GPS 3 SV03 delayed; Atlas 5/AFSPC 7/OTV-6 delayed; Adding Falcon 9/GPS 3 SV04; Adding Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-44; Adding Soyuz/Progress 76P

Sept. 22Long March 3B • Beidou
Launch time: Approx. 2100 GMT (5 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Xichang, China
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket will launch with a payload for the Beidou navigation constellation. [Sept. 20]
Sept. 24H-2B • HTV 8
Launch time: 1605 GMT (12:05 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket will launch the eighth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an automated cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. Delayed from July. Scrubbed by a launch pad fire on Sept. 10. Delayed from Sept. 23. [Sept. 21]
Sept. 24/25Long March 2D • Yunhai 1-02
Launch time: Approx. 0100 GMT on 25th (9 p.m. EDT on 24th)
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket will launch the Yunhai 1-02 environmental monitoring satellite. [Sept. 20]
Sept. 25Soyuz • ISS 61S
Launch time: 1357 GMT (9:57 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-FG configuration. [Aug. 5]
NET Sept. 26Soyuz • EKS 3
Launch window: Approx. 0700-0900 GMT (3:00-5:00 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket is expected to launch the EKS 3 early warning satellite for the Russian military. The EKS, or Tundra, satellites fly in highly elliptical tundra orbits. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1b configuration with a Fregat upper stage. [Sept. 20]
Sept. 30Proton • Eutelsat 5 West B & MEV 1
Launch time: 1026 GMT (6:26 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage will launch the Eutelsat 5 West B communications satellite and the first Mission Extension Vehicle for Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems. Both spacecraft are built by Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, formerly known as Orbital ATK. Eutelsat 5 West B will join Eutelsat’s communications fleet in geostationary orbit, replacing the Eutelsat 5 West A spacecraft providing digital and television services primarily in the French, Italian and Algerian markets. The MEV 1 spacecraft is the first in a series of satellite servicing vehicles for SpaceLogistics, a subsidiary of Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems. MEV 1 will dock with the Intelsat 901 communications satellite and provide propulsion and attitude control functions to extend the spacecraft’s mission. Delayed from May. [Sept. 11]
Oct. 9/10Pegasus XL • ICON
Launch window: 0125-0255 GMT on 10th (9:25-10:55 p.m. EDT on 9th)
Launch site:
L-1011, Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
An air-launched Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket will deploy NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite into orbit. ICON will study the ionosphere, a region of Earth’s upper atmosphere where terrestrial weather meets space weather. Disturbances in the ionosphere triggered by solar storms or weather activity in the lower atmosphere can cause disturbances in GPS navigation and radio transmissions. The mission’s staging point was changed from Kwajalein Atoll to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in mid-2018. Delayed from June 15, Nov. 14, and Dec. 8, 2017. Delayed from June 14, Sept. 24, Oct. 6, Oct. 26 and Nov. 3. Scrubbed on Nov. 7. Delayed from 1st Quarter 2019. [Sept. 20]
TBDLauncherOne • Inaugural Flight
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cosmic Girl (Boeing 747), Mojave Air and Space Port, California
A Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket will make its first orbital test flight after dropping from a modified Boeing 747 carrier aircraft over the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. [Dec. 13]
OctoberPSLV • Cartosat 3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), designated PSLV-C47, will launch the first Cartosat 3-series Earth-imaging and mapping satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. Delayed from mid-2019. [July 29]
NET Oct. 17Falcon 9 • Starlink 1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the second batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 1. [Sept. 11]
Oct. 21Antares • NG-12
Launch time: 1839 GMT (2:39 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 13th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 12th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-12. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from Oct. 1. [Aug. 12]
4th QuarterMinotaur 4 • NROL-129
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0B, Wallops Island, Virginia
A U.S. Air Force and Northrop Grumman Minotaur 4 rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. [July 2]
OctoberPSLV • RISAT 2BR1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) will launch the RISAT 2BR1 radar Earth observation satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. The mission will likely use the “Core Alone” version of the PSLV with no strap-on solid rocket boosters. [Sept. 11]
TBDRockot • Gonets M
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Rockot vehicle with a Breeze KM upper stage will launch three Gonets M communications satellites. Delayed from June. [June 21]
Late 2019Long March 4B • CBERS 4A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Taiyuan, China
A Chinese Long March 4B rocket will launched the CBERS 4A remote sensing satellite. CBERS 4A is the fifth China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite for the collection of global imagery for environmental, urban planning and agricultural applications. [Sept. 11]
NovemberLauncherOne • ELaNa-20
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cosmic Girl (Boeing 747), Mojave Air and Space Port, California
A Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket will launch on its second flight after dropping from a modified Boeing 747 carrier jet. The flight will be conducted under contract to NASA’s Venture Class Launch Services Program, carrying 14 CubeSats to orbit for NASA field centers, U.S. educational institutions and laboratories on the ELaNa-20 rideshare mission. Delayed from Aug. 1 and Sept. 1. [Aug. 5]
NET Nov. 4Falcon 9 • Starlink 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the third batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 2. [Sept. 11]
NET Nov. 11Falcon 9 • JCSAT 18/Kacific 1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the JCSAT 18/Kacific 1 communications satellite jointly owned by SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. of Japan and Kacific Broadband Satellites of Singapore. Built by Boeing, the JCSAT 18/Kacific 1 communications satellite will provide mobile and broadband services across the Asia-Pacific region. [Sept. 11]
Nov. 22Ariane 5 • Inmarsat 5 F5 & TBD
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA250, to launch the Inmarsat 5 F5 communications satellite and a co-passenger to be confirmed. Built by Thales Alenia Space, the Inmarsat 5 F5 satellite is owned by Inmarsat of London. Inmarsat 5 F5 will be the fourth satellite in Inmarsat’s Global Xpress network. Arianespace is expected to select and announce a co-passenger for this mission. [Sept. 11]
NET NovemberFalcon 9 • Starlink 3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the fourth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 3. [Sept. 11]
TBDAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-080, will launch Boeing’s first CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on an unpiloted Orbital Test Flight to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States after an orbital shakedown cruise ahead of a two-person Crew Test Flight. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 27, 2018. Delayed from January, April, Aug. 17 and September. [Aug. 23]
DecemberSSLV • Demonstration Launch
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its first orbital test flight. Consisting of three solid-fueled stages and a liquid-fueled upper stage, the SSLV is a new Indian launch vehicle designed to carry small satellites into low Earth orbit. Delayed from September. [Aug. 23]
DecemberSoyuz • OneWeb 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch approximately 32 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Nov. 20. [July 18]
DecemberProton • Elektro-L 3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Block DM upper stage will launch the Elektro-L 3 geostationary weather satellite. Delayed from Nov. 20. [July 18]
Dec. 4Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 19
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 21st Dragon spacecraft mission on its 19th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Oct. 15. [Feb. 11]
NET DecemberFalcon 9 • Starlink 4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is expected to launch the fifth batch of approximately 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network, a mission designated Starlink 4. [Sept. 11]
TBDLong March 5 • Shijian 20
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch the Shijian 20 communications satellite. Shijian 20 is the first spacecraft based on the new DFH-5 communications satellite platform, a heavier, higher-power next-generation design, replacing the Shijian 18 satellite lost on a launch failure in 2017. Delayed from November 2018. Delayed from January and July. [June 26]
Dec. 17Soyuz • CSG 1 & CHEOPS
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS23, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry the first COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation, or CSG 1, radar surveillance satellite for ASI, the Italian space agency. The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite, or CHEOPS, will fly as a secondary payload on the mission. Built by Airbus Defense and Space in Spain with a Swiss-developed science instrument, CHEOPS will observe transits of planets around other stars to measure their radii. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Oct. 15 and November. [Sept. 11]
Dec. 20Soyuz • Progress 74P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 74th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [Feb. 11]
DecemberAngara-A5 • Test Flight
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Angara-A5 rocket will launch on its second orbital test flight. [Feb. 20]
Late 2019Falcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first test flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken will fly on the Demo-2 mission. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from June, July 25 and Sept. 21. [June 18]
Late 2019SSLV • BlackSky Global
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its first commercial mission with four Earth observation satellites for BlackSky Global, a Seattle-based company. The rideshare mission for BlackSky is being arranged by Spaceflight. Delayed from November. [Aug. 23]
TBDAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-082, will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crew Test Flight, to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States. Boeing astronaut Chris Ferguson and NASA astronauts Mike Fincke and Nicole Mann will fly on the Crew Flight Test. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August. [March 22]
JanuaryFalcon 9 • GPS 3 SV03
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s third third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. The Air Force previously planned to launch the second GPS 3-series satellite on this mission. Delayed from October and December. [Aug. 23]
TBDVega • SSMS POC
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket will launch on the Small Spacecraft Mission Service (SSMS) Proof of Concept mission with 42 microsatellites, nanosatellites and CubeSats for commercial and institutional customers. This rideshare launch is the first flight of a multi-payload dispenser funded by the European Space Agency to allow the Vega rocket to deliver numerous small satellites to orbit on a single mission. Delayed from August and Sept. 10. [Aug. 12]
Early 2020Soyuz • OneWeb 3
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch approximately 32 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 5. [July 18]
FebruaryFalcon 9 • SAOCOM 1B
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SAOCOM 1B satellite for CONAE, Argentina’s space agency. SAOCOM 1B is the second of two SAOCOM 1-series Earth observation satellites designed to provide radar imagery to help emergency responders and monitor the environment, including the collection of soil moisture measurements. Delayed from 4th Quarter of 2019 and January. [Sept. 20]
Feb. 5/6Atlas 5 • Solar Orbiter
Launch time: 0427 GMT on 6th (11:27 p.m. EST on 5th)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the Solar Orbiter spacecraft for NASA and the European Space Agency. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, Solar Orbiter, or SolO, will travel inside the orbit of Mercury to study how the sun creates and controls the heliosphere, the vast bubble of charged particles blown by the solar wind into the interstellar medium. The rocket will fly in the 411 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, one solid rocket booster and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [June 26]
Feb. 7Antares • NG-13
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 14th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 13th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-13. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Moved forward from April 20. [Sept. 11]
Early 2020Soyuz • OneWeb 4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch approximately 32 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz-2.1b rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. [July 18]
Early 2020Long March 5 • Chang’e 5
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch the Chang’e 5 mission to return samples from the moon. It is the first lunar sample return mission attempted since 1976. Delayed from November. [Aug. 12]
March 1Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 20
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 22nd Dragon spacecraft mission on its 20th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Oct. 15. [June 4]
TBDVega • Falcon Eye 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV17, will launch with the Falcon Eye 2 high-resolution Earth-imaging satellite for the United Arab Emirates. Built by Airbus Defense and Space with an optical imaging payload from Thales Alenia Space, Falcon Eye 2 is the second of two surveillance satellites ordered by the UAE’s military. [March 22]
MarchAtlas 5 • AEHF 6
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the sixth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [Aug. 12]
March 20Soyuz • ISS 62S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. [June 4]
April 16Soyuz • Progress 75P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 75th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [Aug. 12]
2nd QuarterAtlas 5 • AFSPC 7/OTV-6
Launch period: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the AFSPC 7 mission for the U.S. Air Force. The mission’s primary payload is the X-37B, a spaceplane also called the Orbital Test Vehicle, on the program’s sixth mission. The rocket will fly in the 501 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from December. [Aug. 23]
MayFalcon 9 • GPS 3 SV04
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s fourth third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. Delayed from October and December. [Aug. 23]
MayH-2B • HTV 9
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket will launch the ninth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an automated cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. [Aug. 12]
JuneDelta 4-Heavy • NROL-44
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. [Aug. 23]
July 15Soyuz • Progress 76P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 76th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [Aug. 23]
July 17Atlas 5 • Mars 2020
Launch window: 1300-1440 GMT (9:00-10:40 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch NASA’s Mars 2020 rover to the Red Planet. After landing in February 2021, the Mars 2020 rover will study Martian geology, search for organic compounds, demonstrate the ability to generate oxygen from atmospheric carbon dioxide, and collect rock samples for return to Earth by a future mission. The rocket will fly in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [Aug. 12]
TBDMinotaur 1 • NROL-111
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0B, Wallops Island, Virginia
A U.S. Air Force and Northrop Grumman Minotaur 1 rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. Delayed from December 2018, 2nd Quarter 2019 and late 2019. [July 2]
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