December 14, 2018

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Dec. 13: Electron/ELaNa-19 scrubbed; Updating time for Falcon 9/GPS 3-01; Updating time for Soyuz/CSO 1; Adding date for Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-71; Adding approximate time for GSLV Mk.2/GSAT 7A; Proton/Blagovest No. 13L moved forward; Adding PSLV/EMISat; Long March 5/Shijian 20 delayed; Adding Epsilon/RAPIS 1; Adding LauncherOne/Inaugural Flight; Delta 4/WGS 10 delayed; Falcon 9/PSN 6 & SpaceIL Lunar Lander delayed; Falcon 9/SpaceX CRS 17 delayed; Adding Falcon 9/Amos 17; Adding Soyuz/Progress 73P; Adding Falcon 9/Crew Dragon Demo-2; Adding H-2B/HTV 8; Adding Soyuz 59S; Adding Atlas 5/CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test; Adding Antares/NG-12; Adding Falcon 9/SpaceX CRS 19; Adding Falcon 9/SAOCOM 1B
Dec. 8: Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-71 scrubbed
Dec. 7: Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-71 scrubbed; Electron/VCLS 1 delayed; Adding time for Soyuz/CSO 1; Adding date for GSLV Mk.2/GSAT 7A; Adding time for Proton/Blagovest No. 13L; Soyuz/Kanopus-V 5 & 6 delayed; Soyuz/EgyptSat-A delayed; Falcon 9/Iridium Next 66-75 delayed; Adding date for Falcon 9/Crew Dragon Demo-1; Adding Ariane 5/Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 & GSAT 31; Soyuz/CSG 1 & CHEOPS delayed; Soyuz 58S moved forward; Soyuz/Progress 72P delayed
Dec. 3: Falcon 9/SpaceX CRS 16 delayed; Falcon 9/Crew Dragon Demo-1 delayed
Dec. 2: Falcon 9/Spaceflight SSO-A delayed; Adding window for Ariane 5/GSAT 11 & GEO-Kompsat 2A; Adding approximate time for Long March 3B/Chang’e 4; Adding time for Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-71

Dec. 15/16Electron • ELaNa-19
Launch window: 0400-0800 GMT on 16th (11:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m. EST on 15th/16th)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch on its fourth flight from a facility on the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand’s North Island. The flight will be conducted under contract to NASA’s Venture Class Launch Services Program, carrying 13 CubeSats to orbit for NASA field centers and U.S. educational institutions on the ELaNa-19 rideshare mission. Delayed from 3rd Quarter and Dec. 10. Scrubbed on Dec. 12 by bad weather. [Dec. 13]
Dec. 18Falcon 9 • GPS 3-01
Launch window: 1411-1435 GMT (9:11-9:35 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s first third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. Delayed from May 3 and late 2017. Switched from a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket. The second GPS 3-series satellite will now launch on a Delta 4. Delayed from September and October. Delayed from Dec. 15. [Nov. 21]
Dec. 18Soyuz • CSO 1
Launch time: 1637:14 GMT (11:37:14 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket, designated VS20, will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry into polar orbit the first Composante Spatiale Optique military reconnaissance satellite for CNES and DGA, the French defense procurement agency. The CSO 1 satellite is the first of three new-generation high-resolution optical imaging satellites for the French military, replacing the Helios 2 spy satellite series. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. [Dec. 13]
Dec. 18/19Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-71
Launch time: 0157 GMT on 19th (8:57 p.m. EST; 5:57 p.m. PST on 18th)
Launch site:
SLC-6, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. Delayed from Sept. 26. Moved forward from Dec. 3. Delayed from Nov. 29. Scrubbed on Dec. 7 by an issue with holdfire circuitry. Scrubbed on Dec. 8 at T-minus 7.5 seconds. [Dec. 13]
Dec. 19GSLV Mk.2 • GSAT 7A
Launch time: Approx. 1030 GMT (5:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), designated GSLV-F11, will launch the GSAT 7A communications satellite for the Indian Air Force. Delayed from Dec. 14. [Dec. 13]
Dec. 20/21Proton • Blagovest No. 13L
Launch time: Approx. 0015 GMT on 21st (7:15 p.m. EST on 20th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Proton rocket and Breeze M upper stage will launch the Blagovest No. 13L communications satellite to cover Russian territory and provide high-speed Internet, television and radio broadcast, and voice and video conferencing services for Russian domestic and military users. Moved forward from Dec. 25. [Dec. 13]
Dec. 26/27Soyuz • Kanopus-V 5 & 6
Launch time: 0207 GMT on 27th (9:07 p.m. EST on 26th)
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the Kanopus-V 5 and 6 Earth observation satellites. The two spacecraft will assist the Russian government in disaster response, mapping and forest fire detection. Multiple secondary payloads from international companies and institutions will also launch on the Soyuz rocket. The Soyuz 2-1a rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Moved forward from Dec. 26. Delayed from Dec. 25. [Dec. 7]
TBDPegasus XL • ICON
Launch window: 0800-0930 GMT (3:00-4:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
L-1011, Skid Strip, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
An air-launched Northrop Grumman Pegasus XL rocket will deploy NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite into orbit. ICON will study the ionosphere, a region of Earth’s upper atmosphere where terrestrial weather meets space weather. Disturbances in the ionosphere triggered by solar storms or weather activity in the lower atmosphere can cause disturbances in GPS navigation and radio transmissions. The mission’s staging point was changed from Kwajalein Atoll to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in mid-2018. Delayed from June 15, Nov. 14, and Dec. 8, 2017. Delayed from June 14, Sept. 24, Oct. 6, Oct. 26 and Nov. 3. Scrubbed on Nov. 7. [Nov. 7]
JanuaryPSLV • EMISat
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 (GSLV Mk.2), designated PSLV-C44, will launch the EMISat satellite, reportedly an electronic intelligence-gathering spacecraft for the Indian government. [Dec. 13]
Jan. 7Falcon 9 • Iridium Next 66-75
Launch time: 1553 GMT (10:53 a.m. EST; 7:53 a.m. PST)
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from October, November and Dec. 30. [Dec. 7]
Jan. 16/17Epsilon • RAPIS 1
Launch window: 0050:20-0059:37 GMT on 17th (7:50:20-7:59:37 p.m. EST on 16th))
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s Epsilon rocket will launch the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Rapid Innovative Payload Demonstration Satellite 1, or RAPIS 1, along with six Japanese and Vietnamese secondary payloads on a rideshare mission. [Dec. 13]
NET Jan. 17/18Falcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 1
Launch time: Approx. 0100 GMT on 18th (8 p.m. EST on 17th)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on an uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. Delayed from December 2016, May 2017, July 2017, August 2017, November 2017, February 2018, April 2018, August 2018, November 2018 and December 2018. Delayed from Jan. 7. [Dec. 7]
Early 2019LauncherOne • Inaugural Flight
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cosmic Girl (Boeing 747), Mojave Air and Space Port, California
A Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket will made its first orbital test flight after dropping from a modified Boeing 747 carrier aircraft over the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. [Dec. 13]
Jan. 23Ariane 5 • Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 & GSAT 31
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA247, to launch the HellasSat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 and GSAT 11 communications satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, the Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 satellite will provide telecommunications and broadband services in Saudi Arabia, other parts of the Middle East, Europe and North Africa. Hellas-Sat 4/SaudiGeoSat 1 is a joint mission between Hellas-Sat, a subsidiary of Arabsat based in Cyprus, and Saudi Arabia’s King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. The GSAT 31 satellite, built and owned by the Indian Space Research Organization, will provide communications coverage over India, replacing the aging Insat 4CR spacecraft. [Dec. 7]
Jan. 25Delta 4 • WGS 10
Launch window: Approx. 2340-0035 GMT on 25th/26th (6:40-7:35 p.m. on 25th)
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the 10th Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Nov. 1, Dec. 13 and Jan. 23. [Dec. 13]
Jan. 30GSLV Mk.3 • Chandrayaan 2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) will launch the Chandrayaan 2 mission, India’s second mission to the moon. Chandrayaan 2 will consist of an orbiter, the Vikram lander and rover launched together into a high Earth orbit. The orbiter is designed to use on-board propulsion to reach the moon, then release the lander and rover. Chandrayaan 2 was originally slated to launch on a GSLV Mk.2 vehicle, but Indian officials decided to switch to a larger GSLV Mk.3 vehicle in 2018. Delayed from March, April and October 2018. Delayed from Jan. 3. [Oct. 25]
TBDVega • PRISMA
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV14, will launch with the PRISMA satellite for the Italian space agency — ASI. PRISMA is an Earth observation satellite fitted with an innovative electro-optical instrument, combining a hyperspectral sensor with a medium-resolution panchromatic camera. The mission will support environmental monitoring and security applications. Delayed from November and December 2018. [Oct. 25]
Feb. 7Soyuz • EgyptSat-A
Launch time: 1647 GMT (11:47 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the EgyptSat-A Earth observation satellite. EgyptSat-A was built by RSC Energia for Egypt’s National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences. Delayed from Nov. 22 and Dec. 27. [Dec. 7]
Feb. 13Falcon 9 • PSN 6 & SpaceIL Lunar Lander
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the PSN 6 communications satellite and SpaceIL’s Lunar Lander. Built by SSL and owned by Indonesia’s PT Pasifik Satelit Nusantara, PSN 6 will provide voice and data communications, broadband Internet, and video distribution throughout the Indonesian archipelago. A privately-funded lunar lander developed by Israel’s SpaceIL will ride piggyback on this launch, along with several smaller payloads under a rideshare arrangement to geostationary transfer orbit provided by Spaceflight. Delayed from January. [Dec. 13]
NET Feb. 18Falcon 9 • Radarsat Constellation Mission
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Radarsat Constellation Mission for the Canadian Space Agency and MDA. Consisting of three radar Earth observation spacecraft launching on a single rocket, the Radarsat Constellation Mission is the next in a series of Canadian Radarsat satellites supporting all-weather maritime surveillance, disaster management and ecosystem monitoring for the Canadian government and international users. Delayed from November. [Oct. 18]
Early 2019Falcon Heavy • Arabsat 6A
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the Arabsat 6A communications satellite for Arabsat of Saudi Arabia. Arabsat 6A will provide Ku-band and Ka-band communications coverage over the Middle East and North Africa regions, as well as a footprint in South Africa. Delayed from first half of 2018 and late 2018. [Oct. 14]
FebruarySoyuz • OneWeb 1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry the first 10 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from late 2018. [Sept. 21]
Feb. 28Soyuz • ISS 58S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Moved forward from April 5. [Dec. 7]
Early 2019Falcon Heavy • STP-2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s Space Test Program-2 mission with a cluster of military and scientific research satellites. The heavy-lift rocket is formed of three Falcon 9 rocket cores strapped together with 27 Merlin 1D engines firing at liftoff. Delayed from October 2016, March 2017 and September 2017. Delayed from April 30, June 13, Oct. 30 and Nov. 30. [Sept. 11]
MarchAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Orbital Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-080, will launch Boeing’s first CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on an unpiloted Orbital Test Flight to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States after an orbital shakedown cruise ahead of a two-person Crew Test Flight. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Aug. 27, 2018, and January. [Oct. 18]
MarchSoyuz • Meteor M2-2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch with the Russian Meteor M2-1 polar-orbiting weather satellite. Delayed from Dec. 6. [Sept. 21]
MarchFalcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 17
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 19th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 17th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 16, Feb. 1 and Feb. 17. [Dec. 13]
March 28Soyuz • Progress 72P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 72nd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from Feb. 7 and Feb. 8. [Dec. 7]
2nd QuarterFalcon 9 • Amos 17
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Amos 17 communications satellite. Built by Boeing and owned by Spacecom Ltd. of Israel, Amos 17 will provide high-throughput broadband connectivity and other communications services over Africa, the Middle East and Europe. [Dec. 13]
2nd QuarterMinotaur 1 • NROL-111
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0B, Wallops Island, Virginia
A U.S. Air Force and Northrop Grumman Minotaur 1 rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. Delayed from December. [Sept. 6]
2nd QuarterLong March 5 • Shijian 20
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch the Shijian 20 communications satellite. Shijian 20 is the first spacecraft based on the new DFH-5 communications satellite platform, a heavier, higher-power next-generation design, replacing the Shijian 18 satellite lost on a launch failure in 2017. Delayed from November 2018. Delayed from January. [Dec. 13]
April 4Delta 4 • GPS 3-02
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s second third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. The Air Force previously planned to launch the third GPS 3-series satellite on this mission. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (4,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Nov. 1 and Dec. 13. [Sept. 6]
April 17Antares • NG-11
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 12th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 11th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-11. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. [July 27]
May 7Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 18
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 20th Dragon spacecraft mission on its 18th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. [July 27]
June 5Soyuz • Progress 73P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 73rd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [Dec. 13]
JuneFalcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 2
Launch time: Approx. 0100 GMT on 18th (8 p.m. EST on 17th)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first test flight with astronauts on-board to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken will fly on the Demo-2 mission. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. [Dec. 13]
JulyAtlas 5 • AEHF 5
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 551 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, five solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [July 10]
JulyH-2B • HTV 8
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket will launch the eighth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an automated cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. [Dec. 13]
JulySoyuz • ISS 59S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. [Dec. 13]
AugustAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-082, will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crew Test Flight, to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States. Boeing astronaut Chris Ferguson and NASA astronauts Eric Boe and Nicole Mann will fly on the Crew Flight Test. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. [Dec. 13]
Oct. 1Antares • NG-12
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 13th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 12th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-12. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. [Dec. 13]
OctoberFalcon 9 • GPS 3-03
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s third third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The satellite is built by Lockheed Martin. The Air Force previously planned to launch the second GPS 3-series satellite on this mission. [Sept. 6]
NET Oct. 15Soyuz • CSG 1 & CHEOPS
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ELS, Sinnamary, French Guiana
An Arianespace Soyuz rocket will launch on a mission from the Guiana Space Center in South America. The Soyuz will carry the first COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation, or CSG 1, radar surveillance satellite for ASI, the Italian space agency. The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite, or CHEOPS, will fly as a secondary payload on the mission. Built by Airbus Defense and Space in Spain with a Swiss-developed science instrument, CHEOPS will observe transits of planets around other stars to measure their radii. The Soyuz 2-1b (Soyuz ST-B) rocket will use a Fregat upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 14, 2017, and early 2019. [Dec. 7]
Oct. 15Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 19
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 21st Dragon spacecraft mission on its 19th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. [Dec. 13]
4th QuarterFalcon 9 • SAOCOM 1B
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SAOCOM 1B satellite for CONAE, Argentina’s space agency. SAOCOM 1B is the second of two SAOCOM 1-series Earth observation satellites designed to provide radar imagery to help emergency responders and monitor the environment, including the collection of soil moisture measurements. [Dec. 13]
Late 2019Long March 5 • Chang’e 5
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch the Chang’e 5 mission to return samples from the moon. It is the first lunar sample return mission attempted since 1976. Delayed from November. [Sept. 26]
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!