Jan. 3, 2023 Falcon 9 • Transporter 6
Launch time: 1456 GMT (9:56 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Transporter 6 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with 114 small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Delayed from October, November, and December. Delayed from Jan. 2. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 8, 2023 Long March 7A • Shijian 23
Launch time: 2200 GMT (5:00 p.m. EST)
Launch site: Wenchang, China

A Chinese Long March 7A rocket launched launched the Shijian 23 satellite into geostationary transfer orbit. Shijian 23 is likely an experimental communications satellite.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 9/10, 2023 Falcon 9 • OneWeb 16
Launch time: 0450 GMT on 10th (11:50 p.m. EST on 9th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 40 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing and deploying a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. This was the second launch of OneWeb satellites with SpaceX, and OneWeb’s 16th launch overall. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Delayed from Jan. 8. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 10, 2023 RS-1 • Flight 1
Launch time: 2327 GMT (6:27 p.m. EST)
Launch site: LP-3C, Pacific Spaceport Complex, Kodiak Island, Alaska

An ABL RS-1 rocket failed during launch on its first orbital test flight, carrying two CubeSats for OmniTeq, a company with plans to deploy a constellation of small satellites to provide maritime communications services. Delayed from November and Dec. 7. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 15, 2023 Falcon Heavy • USSF 67
Launch time: 2256 GMT (5:56 p.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched the USSF 67 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The mission launched the Space Force’s second Continuous Broadcast Augmenting SATCOM, or CBAS 2, military communications satellite and the Long Duration Propulsive ESPA 3A, or LDPE 3A, rideshare satellite hosting multiple experimental payloads. The Falcon Heavy’s two side boosters landed at Landing Zones 1 and 1 at Cape Canaveral, and SpaceX did not attempt to recover the core stage. Delayed from 4th Quarter 2022, Jan. 10, Jan. 12, Jan. 13, and Jan. 14. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 18, 2023 Falcon 9 • GPS 3 SV06
Launch time: 1224 GMT (7:24 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the U.S. Space Force’s sixth third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The satellite was built by Lockheed Martin. Delayed from late 2022. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 19, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-4
Launch time: 1543:10 GMT (10:43:10 a.m. EST; 7:43:10 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 51 Starlink internet satellites. This mission deployed the Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Jan. 10. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 24, 2023 Electron • “Virginia is for Launch Lovers”
Launch time: 2300 GMT (6:00 p.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-2, Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, Wallops Island, Virginia

A Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle lifted off with three satellites for HawkEye 360, radio frequency geospatial analytics provider. This was the first Rocket Lab mission from a new launch pad in Virginia. Delayed from Dec. 7, Dec. 9, Dec. 13, Dec. 15, Dec. 16, Dec. 18, and Jan. 23. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 25/26, 2023 H-2A • IGS Radar 7
Launch time: 0150:21 GMT on 26th (8:51:21 p.m. EST on 25th)
Launch site: Launch Pad 1, Tanegashima Space Center, Japan

A Japanese H-2A rocket, designated H-2A F46, launched the IGS Radar 7 radar reconnaissance satellite for Japan’s Information Gathering Satellites for the Japanese government’s Cabinet Satellite Intelligence Center. The H-2A rocket flew in the 202 configuration with two strap-on solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Jan. 24. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 26, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-2
Launch time: 0932:20 GMT (4:32:20 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 56 Starlink internet satellites. This was the second launch into a new orbital shell for SpaceX’s second-generation Starlink constellation, called Starlink Gen2. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Jan. 24. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Jan. 31, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-6
Launch time: 1615 GMT (11:15 a.m. EST; 8:15 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 49 Starlink internet satellites and a rideshare space tug payload for the Italian company D-Orbit. This mission deployed the Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Jan. 29 and Jan. 30. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 2, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-3
Launch time: 0758:20 GMT (2:58:20 a.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 53 Starlink internet satellites. This was the third launch into a new orbital shell for SpaceX’s second-generation Starlink constellation, called Starlink Gen2. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 1. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 5, 2023 Proton • Elektro-L 4
Launch time: 0912:52 GMT (4:12:52 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Proton rocket launched the Elektro-L 4 geostationary weather satellite. Built by NPO Lavochkin, the Elektro-L 4 satellite will provide near-real-time imagery of weather systems over Russia’s Far East and the Asia-Pacific region. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 6/7, 2023 Falcon 9 • Amazonas Nexus
Launch time: 0132 GMT on 7th (8:32 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Amazonas Nexus communications satellite for the Spanish company Hispasat. Amazonas Nexus will provide broadband connectivity to airplanes, ships, and other mobile users across the Americas, Greenland, and travel corridors across the Atlantic Ocean. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The satellite was built by Thales Alenia Space, and is based on the Spacebus NEO platform. Scrubbed on Feb. 5 due to poor launch and recovery weather. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 9, 2023 Soyuz • Progress 83P
Launch time: 0615:36 GMT (1:15:36 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 83rd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 9/10, 2023 SSLV • EOS-07
Launch time: 0348 GMT on 10th (10:48 p.m. EST on 9th)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) launched on its second orbital test flight following a failed inaugural launch attempt in 2022. This mission, known as SSLV-D2, launched India’s EOS-07 Earth observation technology demonstratoin satellite and two small rideshare payloads for Space Kidz India and Antaris. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 12, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-4
Launch time: 0510:10 GMT (12:10:10 a.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 55 Starlink internet satellites. This was the fourth launch into a new orbital shell for SpaceX’s second-generation Starlink constellation, called Starlink Gen2. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 1. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 17, 202 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-5
Launch time: 1912:20 GMT (2:12:20 p.m. EST; 11:12:20 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 51 Starlink internet satellites. This mission deployed the Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 17/18, 2023 Falcon 9 • Inmarsat 6 F2
Launch time: 0359 GMT on 18th (10:59 p.m. EST on 17th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Inmarsat 6 F2 communications satellite for London-based Inmarsat. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, the satellite carries L-band and Ka-band payloads to provide mobile communications services to airplanes and ships. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 23/24, 2023 Soyuz • Soyuz MS-23
Launch time: 0024:29 GMT on 24th (7:24:29 p.m. EST on 23rd)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the uncrewed Soyuz MS-23 spacecraft to the International Space Station. The mission was originally supposed to carry Russian commander Oleg Kononenko, Russian flight engineer Nikolai Chub, and NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara, but managers removed the crew from the mission in order to use the Soyuz MS-23 spacecraft as a replacement for the damaged Soyuz MS-22 spacecraft docked to the space station. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

Feb. 27, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-1
Launch time: 2313:50 GMT (6:13:50 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 21 Starlink internet satellites. This was the first mission to launch a new larger Starlink spacecraft design known as “Starlink V2 Mini.” The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 23. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 2, 2023 Falcon 9 • Crew 6
Launch time: 0534:14 GMT (12:34:14 a.m. EST)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s ninth flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. NASA astronauts Stephen Bowen, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, UAE astronaut Sultan Al Neyadi, and Russian cosmonaut Andrey Fedyaev launched on the Crew Dragon spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from Feb. 19 and Feb. 26. Scrubbed on Feb. 27 due to a concern with the TEA-TEB ignition system. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 3, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-7
Launch time: 1838:50 GMT (1:38:50 p.m. EST; 10:38:50 a.m. PST)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 51 Starlink internet satellites. This mission deployed the Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 27, Feb. 28, and March 2. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 6/7, 2023 H3 • ALOS 3
Launch time: 0137:55 GMT on 7th (8:37:55 p.m. EST on 6th)
Launch site: Launch Pad 2, Tanegashima Space Center, Japan

A Japanese H3 rocket failed during launch on its first test flight with the Advanced Land Observing Satellite 3, or ALOS 3, Earth observation satellite for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The second stage engine on the H3 rocket did not ignite. ALOS 3, also named Daichi 3, was designed to capture high-resolution, wide-swath images of all of the world’s land surfaces, providing data for applications in disaster management, land use, urban sprawl, scientific research, and coastal and vegetation environmental monitoring. The H3 rocket for Test Flight 1, or TF1, flew in the H3-22S configuration with two first stage engines, two strap-on solid rocket boosters, and a short payload fairing. Delayed from Feb. 11. Countdown Feb. 16 aborted after main engine start. Delayed from March 6 by bad weather forecast. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 9, 2023 Falcon 9 • OneWeb 17
Launch time: 1913:28 GMT (2:13:28 p.m. EST)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 40 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing and deploying a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. This was the third launch of OneWeb satellites with SpaceX, and OneWeb’s 17th launch overall. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Delayed from March 1. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

Jan. 9, 2023 LauncherOne • “Start Me Up”
Launch time: 2308 GMT (6:08 p.m. EST)
Launch site: Cosmic Girl (Boeing 747), Spaceport Cornwall, Cornwall Airport Newquay, England

A Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket failed during launch of nine small satellites for seven customers after dropping from a modified Boeing 747 carrier jet. The mission will be the first orbital launch based out of the United Kingdom and all of Western Europe. The LauncherOne rocket carried small payloads for the UK Ministry of Defense’s Defense Science & Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, RHEA Group, Space Forge, Satellite Applications Catapult, SatRevolution, and Oman. Virgin Orbit called this mission “Start Me Up.” Read our full story.

Updated: March 26

March 12, 2023 Proton • Olymp-K 2
Launch time: 2313 GMT (7:13 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage launched an Olymp-K communications satellite for the Russian military. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 14/15, 2023 Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 27
Launch time: 0030:42 GMT on 15th (8:30:42 p.m. EDT on 14th)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The flight is the 27th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from March 11. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 16, 2023 Electron • “Stronger Together”
Launch time: 2238 GMT (6:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: LC-2, Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, Wallops Island, Virginia

A Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle lifted off with the Capella-9 and Capella-10 commercial radar Earth observation satellites for Capella Space. This was the second Rocket Lab mission from a new launch pad in Virginia. Delayed from March 11 due to upper level winds. Delayed from March 15. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 17, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-8
Launch time: 1926:40 GMT (3:26:40 p.m. EDT; 12:26:40 p.m. PDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 52 Starlink internet satellites. This mission deployed the Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from March 16. See our Mission Status Center.

Updated: March 25

March 17, 2023 Falcon 9 • SES 18 & SES 19
Launch time: 2338 GMT (7:38 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched SES 18 and SES 19 communications satellites for SES of Luxembourg. SES 18 and 19, built by Northrop Grumman, will provide C-band television and data services over the United States. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from March 8. Read our full story.

Updated: March 25

March 22/23, 2023 Terran 1 • “Good Luck, Have Fun”
Launch time: 0325 GMT on 23rd (11:25 p.m. EDT on 22nd)
Launch site: LC-16, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A Relativity Space Terran 1 rocket launched on its inaugural demonstration flight. It did not include a customer payload. Scrubbed on March 8 and March 11. Failed to reach orbit when a problem occurred during the second-stage portion of flight. Read our launch story.

Updated: March 25

March 23, 2023 Soyuz • Bars-M4
Launch time: Approx. 0640 GMT (2:40 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia

A Russian Soyuz rocket launched the fourth Bars-M cartography satellite for the Russian military.

Updated: March 25

March 24, 2023 Electron • “The Beat Goes On”
Launch time: 0914 GMT (3:45 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1B, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launch two commercial optical Earth-imaging satellites for BlackSky. This mission was nicknamed “The Beat Goes On” by Rocket Lab, and featured an attempt to recover the Electron’s first stage booster at sea. Read our launch coverage.

Updated: March 26

March 24, 2023 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-5
Launch time: 1543 GMT (11:43 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Read our launch story.

Updated: March 25

March 25/26 GSLV Mk.3 • OneWeb 18
Launch time: 0330 GMT on 26th (11:30 p.m. EDT on 25th)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) launched 36 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. Read our live coverage.

Updated: March 26

March 28 Shavit 2 • Ofek 13
Launch time: 2310 GMT (7:10 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: Palmachim, Israel

An Israeli Shavit 2 rocket launched the Ofek 13 radar spy satellite for the Israeli Ministry of Defense. The radar Earth-imaging spacecraft was built by Israel Aerospace Industries and launched into a retrograde orbit.

Updated: April 02

March 29 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-10
Launch time: 4:01 p.m. EDT (2001 GMT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from March 24. Payload originally Starlink V2 Mini satellites but changed to V1.5 spacecraft.

Updated: March 31

March 29 Soyuz • Kosmos 2568
Launch time: 1957 GMT (3:57 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia

A Russian Soyuz 2-1v rocket launched an undisclosed payload for the Russian military.

Updated: April 10

March 30 Long March 2D • Hongtu-1 Group 1 Sats 1 to 4
Launch time: 1050 GMT (6:50 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Taiyuan, China

A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched four radar satellites into orbit.

Updated: April 10

April 2 Falcon 9 • SDA Tranche 0A
Launch time: 1429 GMT (10:29 a.m. EDT; 7:29 a.m. PDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 10 Tranche 0 demonstration satellites for the U.S. military’s Space Development Agency. The launch was the first of two Falcon 9 missions to carry SDA demonstration spacecraft for a future constellation of military missile tracking and data relay satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from Sept. 24. Delayed from Sept. 29 by payload supply chain issues. Delayed from January due to satellite issue. Delayed following an abort at T-3 seconds on Mar. 30. Our live coverage.

Updated: April 02

April 7 Falcon 9 • Intelsat 40e/TEMPO
Launch time: 0430 GMT (12:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Intelsat 40e communications satellite for Intelsat. Intelsat 40e will join Intelsat’s “Epic” fleet of high-throughput satellites, providing in-flight connectivity and other mobile communications services over North and Central America. Intelsat 40e is a partial replacement for Intelsat 29e, which failed in 2019. Intelsat 40e hosts NASA’s Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument to measure atmospheric chemistry and monitor air pollution over North America. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The satellite was built by Maxar, and is based on the 1300 platform. Delayed from March 7. Read our launch story.

Updated: April 10

April 14 Ariane 5 • JUICE
Launch time: 1214:29 GMT (8:14:29 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: ELA-3, Guiana Space Center, French Guiana

Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA260, to launch the European Space Agency’s Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer mission, or JUICE. The JUICE spacecraft, built by Airbus, will make detailed observations of the giant gas planet and its three large ocean-bearing moons — Ganymede, Callisto and Europa — with a suite of remote sensing, geophysical and in situ instruments. JUICE will enter orbit around Jupiter in July 2031. This will mark the penultimate launch of Europe’s Ariane 5 rocket. Scrubbed on April 13 due to high risk of lightning at the launch site.

Updated: April 15

April 14/15 Falcon 9 • Transporter 7
Launch time: 0648 GMT on 15th (2:48 a.m. EDT; 11:48 p.m. PDT on 14th)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Transporter 7 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with numerous small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from April 9. Moved forward from April 12. Delayed from April 11. Scrubbed on April 14 due to bad weather.

Updated: April 15

April 19 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-2
Launch time: 1431:10 GMT (10:31:10 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 21 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Read our full story.

Updated: April 19

April 20 Starship • Integrated Flight Test
Launch time: 1333 GMT (9:33 a.m. EDT; 8:33 a.m. CDT)
Launch site: Starbase, Boca Chica Beach, Texas

A SpaceX Super Heavy booster and Starship launch vehicle launched on the first fully integrated test flight of the new rocket. The mission ended four minutes after liftoff with a self-destruct command, following loss of vehicle control. If everything went according to plan, the mission would have traveled around the world for nearly one full orbit, resulting in a re-entry and splashdown of the Starship near Hawaii. The mission was attempting to reach near orbital velocity. The Super Heavy booster would have targeted a controlled splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico. Delayed from 2022. Scrubbed on April 17. See our Mission Status Center.

Updated: April 21

April 22 PSLV • TeLEOS 2
Launch time: 0849 GMT (4:49 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India

India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, or PSLV, will launch the TeLEOS 2 satellite for Singapore. TeLEOS 2 was built in Singapore by ST Electronics, and carries an all-weather synthetic aperture radar Earth observation payload. Read our full story.

Updated: April 24

April 27 Falcon 9 • Starlink 3-5
Launch time: 1340:50 GMT (9:40:50 a.m. EDT; 6:40:50 a.m. PDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 46 Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from April 25. Scrubbed on April 26.

Updated: April 28

April 28 Falcon 9 • O3b mPOWER 3 & 4
Launch time: 2212 GMT (6:12 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the second pair of O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites into Medium Earth Orbit for SES of Luxembourg. The satellites, built by Boeing, will provide internet services over most of the populated world, building on SES’s O3b network. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from February and March. Read our full story.

Updated: April 29

April30/May 1 Falcon Heavy • ViaSat 3 Americas
Launch time: 0026 GMT on 1st (8:26 p.m. EDT on 30th)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched the ViaSat 3 Americas broadband communications satellite. ViaSat 3 Americas is the first of at least three new-generation Boeing-built geostationary satellites for ViaSat. A small communications satellite named Arcturus will launch as a secondary payload for Astranis. Delayed from 3rd Quarter and December 2022. Delayed from January, March 2023, April 8, April 18, April 24, and April 26. Scrubbed on April 27 and April 28.

Updated: May 02

May 4 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-6
Launch time: 0731 GMT (3:31 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: May 04

May 7/8 Electron • TROPICS 3 & 4
Launch time: 0100 GMT on 8th (9:00 p.m. EDT on 7th)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1B, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched the second pair of small CubeSats for NASA’s TROPICS mission. The Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats, or TROPICS, mission will measure environmental and inner-core conditions for tropical cyclones. These two satellites were originally contracted to launch on Astra’s Rocket 3 vehicle. This mission was nicknamed “Rocket Like A Hurricane” by Rocket Lab. Read our full story.

Updated: May 09

May 10 Long March 7 • Tianzhou 6
Launch time: 1322:51 GMT (9:22:51 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Wenchang, China

A Chinese Long March 7 rocket launched the Tianzhou 6 resupply ship to dock with the Chinese space station. The automated cargo craft is the fifth resupply freighter for the Chinese space station. Read our full story.

Updated: May 10

May 10 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-9
Launch time: 2009 GMT (1:09 p.m. PDT, 4:09 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink internet satellites. This mission deployed 51 Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from April. Read our full story.

Updated: May 11

May 14 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-9
Launch time: 0503:30 GMT (1:03:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 56 Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from April. Read our full story.

Updated: May 14

May 19 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-3
Launch time: 0619:30 GMT (2:19:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from April and May 18. Read our full story.

Updated: May 21

May 20 Falcon 9 • OneWeb & Iridium Next
Launch time: 1316:33 GMT (9:16:33 a.m. EDT; 6:16:33 a.m. PDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 15 spare satellites for OneWeb’s first-generation global internet network and one prototype for OneWeb’s Gen2 second-generation network. Five spare satellites for Iridium’s voice and data relay fleet also launched on this mission. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from May 19. See our Mission Status Center.

Updated: May 21

May 21 Falcon 9 • Axiom Mission 2
Launch time: 2137 GMT (5:37 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 10th flight with astronauts. The commercial mission, managed by Axiom Space, is commanded by former NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson. Paying passenger John Shoffner will serve as pilot of the mission. Two commercial space fliers from Saudi Arabia, Ali AlQarni and Rayyanah Barnawi, will also be on the approximately 12-day mission to the space station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea off the coast of Florida. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will return to Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral. Delayed from May 8 as result of delays in previous Falcon Heavy launch.

Updated: May 22

May 24 Soyuz • Progress 84P
Launch time: 1256:07 GMT (8:56:07 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 84th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. Read our full story.

Updated: May 25

May 25/26 Electron • TROPICS 5 & 6
Launch time: 0346 GMT on 26th (11:46 p.m. EDT on 25th)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched the third pair of small CubeSats for NASA’s TROPICS mission. The Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats, or TROPICS, mission will measure environmental and inner-core conditions for tropical cyclones. These two satellites were originally contracted to launch on Astra’s Rocket 3 vehicle. This mission was nicknamed “Coming To A Storm Near You” by Rocket Lab. Delayed from May 15, May 22, and May 24. Read our full story.

Updated: May 26

May 27 Falcon 9 • Badr 8
Launch time: 0430 GMT (12:30 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Badr 8 communications satellite for Arabsat based in Saudi Arabia. From geostationary orbit, Badr 8 will provide communications coverage for Arabsat customers over Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Badr 8 also hosts an optical communications payload developed by Airbus. The spacecraft was built by Airbus, and is based on the Eurostar Neo platform. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from May 21. Scrubbed on May 23 by bad weather. Delayed from May 24.

Updated: May 28

May 29 GSLV Mk. 2 • NVS 01
Launch time: 0512 GMT (1:12 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India.

An Indian Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 2 rocket, designated GSLV-F12, launched the NVS 01 navigation satellite for the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, also called Navigation with Indian Constellation, or NavIC. The spacecraft is also known as IRNSS 1J, and is the first in a second-generation fleet of Indian navigation satellites. Read our full story.

Updated: May 31

May 29/30 Long March 2F • Shenzhou 16
Launch time: 0131 GMT on 30th (9:31 p.m. EDT on 29th)
Launch site: Jiuquan, China

A Chinese Long March 2F rocket launched the Shenzhou 16 spacecraft with three Chinese astronauts to rendezvous and dock with the Chinese space station in low Earth orbit. This is China’s 11th crewed space mission, and the fifth to the Chinese space station. The mission is commanded by Jing Haipeng, the spaceflight engineer is Zhu Yangzhu, and the payload specialist is Gui Haichao. Read our full story.

Updated: May 31

May 30/31 Falcon 9 • Starlink 2-10
Launch time: 0602:30 GMT on 31st (2:02:30 a.m. EDT; 11:02:30 p.m. PDT on 30th)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 52 Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. This mission deployed the Starlink satellites into a high-inclination orbit inclined 70 degrees to the equator. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. Read our full story.

Updated: June 02

June 4 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-4
Launch time: 1220 GMT (8:20 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Moved forward from June 3. Delayed from May 30 and June 1. Read our full story.

Updated: June 04

June 5 Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 28
Launch time: 1547 GMT (11:47 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The flight was the 28th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from June 3. Scrubbed June 4 due to high winds in the booster recovery area.

Updated: June 06

June 12 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-11
Launch time: 0710:50 GMT (3:10:50 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 52 Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from June 9, June 10, and June 12. Read our full story.

Updated: June 12

June 12 Falcon 9 • Transporter 8
Launch time: 2135 GMT (5:35 p.m. EDT; 2:35 p.m. PDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Transporter 8 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with numerous small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. Launch site changed from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station to Vandenberg Space Force Base. Delayed from June 8.

Updated: June 13

June 18 Falcon 9 • PSN SATRIA
Launch time: 2221 UTC (6:21 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Satria communications satellite for the Indonesian government and the Indonesian satellite operator PSN. The Satria satellite will provide broadband internet and communications capacity for schools, hospitals, and other public use facilities in Indonesia’s rural regions. The satellite was built by Thales Alenia Space, and is based on the Spacebus Neo platform. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Moved forward from June 19.

Updated: June 20

June 22 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-7
Launch time: 0719 GMT (3:19 a.m. EDT; 12:19 a.m. PDT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 47 Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: June 23

June 22 Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-68
Launch time: 1018 UTC (5:18 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket launched a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. This is the penultimate flight of a Delta 4 rocket. Delayed from March and April 20. Scrubbed June 21 due to ground pneumatic valve issue. Read our launch story.

Updated: June 23

June 23 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-12
Launch time: 1535 GMT (11:35 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: June 24

June 27 Soyuz • Meteor-M 2-3
Launch time: 1134 UTC
Launch site: Site 1S Vostochny Cosmodrome

A Soyuz rocket launched a Russian civilian weather satellite into polar orbit. The Soyuz employed a new version of the Fregat-M upper stage.

Updated: June 27

July 1 Falcon 9 • Euclid
Launch time: 1512 GMT (11:12 a.m. EDT)
Launch site: Cape Canaveral, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Euclid mission for the European Space Agency. Euclid is an astrophysics mission with a telescope and two scientific instruments designed to explore the evolution of the dark universe. It will make a 3D-map of the universe by observing billions of galaxies out to 10 billion light-years, across more than a third of the sky. Euclid will be launched to an observing orbit at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. The mission was originally supposed to launch on a Russian Soyuz rocket. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: July 01

July 5 Ariane 5 • Syracuse 4B & Heinrich Hertz
Launch time: 2200-2332 UTC (7 p.m.-8:05 p.m. Kourou time, 6 p.m.-7:05 p.m. EDT)
Launch site: ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana

Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA260, launched the Syracuse 4B and Heinrich Hertz communications satellites. Syracuse 4B, built by Airbus, will relay secure communications between French military aircraft, ground vehicles, and naval vessels, including submarines. The Heinrich Hertz satellite, built by OHB, will test new communications technologies on a mission funded by the German government. This will be the final launch of an Ariane 5 rocket. Delayed from February due to problems completing the Heinrich Hertz satellite. Moved forward from June 21. Delayed from June 16. Delayed from July 4 due to upper level winds.

Updated: July 06

July 7 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-13
Launch time: 12:29:50 p.m. PDT (3:29:50 p.m. EDT, 1929:50 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: July 07

July 9/10 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-5
Launch time: 11:58 p.m. EDT (0336 UTC on the 10th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: July 11

July 14 LVM3 • Chandrayaan-3
Launch time: 2:35 p.m. IST (5:05 a.m. EDT) (0905 UTC)
Launch site: Second Launch Pad, SDSC-SHAR, Sriharikota, India

The Indian Space Research Organization launched a Launch Vehicle Mark-III (LVM3) rocket from the Second Launch Pad at SDSC-SHAR in Sriharikota, India. The primary payload was the Chandrayaan-3 lunar lander, the third mission to the Moon for India. It also includes secondary payloads specifically for the lander (RAMBHA-Lunar Probe; ChaSTE, Chandra’s Surface Thermo-physical Experiment and ISLA, Instrument for Lunar Seismic Activity) as well as rover payloads (APXS, Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer; and LIBS, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope). This mission was the fourth operational mission for the LVM3 rocket.

Updated: July 14

July 15 Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-15
Launch time: 11:50 p.m. EDT (0350 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the final batch of Starlink V1.5 internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, A Shortfall of Gravitas, in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from July 14.

Updated: July 16

July 17/18 Electron • ‘Baby Come Back’
Launch time: 0127 UTC (1:27 p.m. NZST on 18th / 9:27 p.m. EDT on 17th)
Launch site: Pad BLaunch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched NASA’s Starling mission, which consists of four cubsats to demonstrate technologies for future ‘swarm’ satellites. It will also carry Telesat’s LEO 3 demonstration satellite for Space Flight Laboratory and two 3U satellites for Spire Global, carrying Global Navigation Satellite System Radio Occultation (GNSS-RO) payloads which provide data to improve weather models and forecasts. The first stage of the Electron rocket was recovered after it splashes down in the ocean. Delayed from July 14.

Updated: July 18

July 19/20 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-15
Launch time: 9:09 p.m. PDT (12:09 a.m. EDT / 0409 UTC on 20th)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on the drone ship, Of Course I Still Love You, in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: July 20

July 23/24 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-6
Launch time: 8:50 p.m. EDT (0050 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from July 22 due to weather.

Updated: July 24

July 28 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-7
Launch time: 12:01 a.m. EDT (0401 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, A Shortfall of Gravitas, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: July 28

July 28/29 Falcon Heavy • Jupiter 3/EchoStar 24
Launch time: 11:04 p.m. EDT (0304 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched the Jupiter 3/EchoStar 24 broadband communications satellite. Built by Maxar, Jupiter 3/EchoStar 24 is a Ka-band high-throughput ultra high density satellite for EchoStar’s Hughes Network Systems. Jupiter 3/EchoStar 24 will support in-flight WiFi, maritime connections, enterprise networks, backhaul for mobile network operators, and community WiFi solutions across the Americas. Delayed from May. Moved up from August. Delayed from July 23, 26 and 27.

Updated: July 29

Aug. 1 Antares • NG-19
Launch time: 8:31 p.m. EDT (0031 UTC)
Launch site: Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launched the 20th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 19th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-19. The rocket flew in the Antares 230+ configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. This was the final flight of an Antares 230+ rocket before a redesign with new U.S.-made engines. Delayed from March, April 21, May, and July.

Updated: August 02

August 3 Falcon 9 • Galaxy 37
Launch time: 1:00 a.m. EDT (0500 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Galaxy 37 C-band television broadcasting satellite for Intelsat. The spacecraft was built by Maxar. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from 2nd Quarter.

Updated: August 03

August 6/7 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-8
Launch time: 10:41 p.m. EDT (0241 UTC on 7th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, A Shortfall of Gravitas, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: August 07

August 7/8 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-20
Launch time: 11:57 p.m. EDT (8:57 p.m. PDT / 0357 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, Of Course I Still Love You, in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: August 09

August 10 Soyuz • Luna 25
Launch time: 7:10 p.m. EDT (2310 UTC)
Launch site: Pad 1S, Vostochny Cosmodrome, Russia

A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket launched Russia’s first mission to the Moon since 1976. The robotic lander is supposed to touchdown north of Boguslawsky crater near the south pole of the Moon. Luna-25 has eight scientific instruments on board including a mechanical arm and bucket that can scoop up lunar regolith.

Updated: August 11

August 11 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-9
Launch time: 1:17 a.m. EDT (0517 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: August 11

August 16/17 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-10
Launch time: 11:36 p.m. EDT (0336 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, A Shortfall of Gravitas, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: August 17

August 22 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-1
Launch time: 2:37 a.m. PDT (5:37 a.m. EDT / 0937 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, Of Course I Still Love You, in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Aug. 17 and 18.

Updated: August 22

August 22/23 Soyuz • Progress 85P
Launch time: 6:08 a.m. local time on 23rd (9:08 p.m. EDT / 0108 UTC)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 85th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration.

Updated: August 23

August 23/24 Electron • ‘We Love the Nightlife’
Launch time: 2330-0330 UTC Aug. 23 to 24 (7:30-11:30 p.m. EDT Aug. 23 / 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. New Zealand Standard Time)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched the first of Capella Space’s next-generation Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Earth-imaging satellites called “Acadia.” This will be the first launch of these four, new satellites. The mission is dubbed “We Love the Nightlife” since the SAR satellites allow for high-resolution imagery a night. Delayed from July 28. Launch aborted on July 30. Delayed from Aug. 4 and 6.

Updated: August 24

August 26 Falcon 9 • Crew 7
Launch time: 3:27:27 a.m. EDT (0727:27 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 11th flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to land at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Andreas Mogensen, JAXA (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft, named Endurance, to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from Aug. 15, 17, 21 and 25.

Updated: August 26

August 26/27 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-11
Launch time: 9:05 p.m. EDT (0105 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Aug. 22.

Updated: August 27

Aug. 31/Sept. 1 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-13
Launch time: 10:21 p.m. EDT (0221 UTC on Sept. 1)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: September 01

September 2 PSLV-XL • Aditya-L1
Launch time: 11:50 a.m. IST (2:20 a.m. EDT, 0620 UTC)
Launch site: First Launch Pad, SDSC-SHAR, Sriharikota, India

The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) used its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-XL), designated PSLV-C57, to launch the Aditya-L1 spacecraft, marking India’s first, space-based mission to study the Sun. The spacecraft will operated in a halo orbit around the Lagrange point 1 (L1) of the Sun-Earth system, which is roughly 1.5 million km away. Aditya-L1 will study solar flares, space weather and coronal heating.

Updated: September 02

September 2 Falcon 9 • SDA Tranche 0B
Launch time: 7:25 a.m. PDT (10:25 a.m. EDT / 1425 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 13 Tranche 0 demonstration satellites for the U.S. military’s Space Development Agency. The launch is the second of two Falcon 9 missions to carry SDA demonstration spacecraft for a future constellation of military missile tracking and data relay satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from June. Launched delayed from Aug. 31 due to an engine issue on the Falcon 9 rocket and delayed from Sept. 1.

Updated: September 02

September 3/4 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-12
Launch time: 10:47 p.m. EDT (0247 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 21 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, Just Read the Instructions, in the Atlantic Ocean. This was the record-breaking 62nd launch of the year for SpaceX, beating the company’s previous record of 61 orbital launches for all of 2022.

Updated: September 04

September 6/7 H-2A • XRISM & SLIM
Launch time: 8:42:11 a.m. JST on Sept. 7 (7:42:11 p.m. EDT on Sept. 6, 2342:11 UTC)
Launch site: Launch Pad 1, Tanegashima Space Center, Japan

A Japanese H-2A rocket, designated H-2A F47, launched the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission, or XRISM, a joint project between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and NASA. XRISM is a replacement for the Hitomi X-ray astrophysics observatory, which failed about one month after launch in 2016. XRISM will perform high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of the hot gas plasma wind that blows through the galaxies in the universe. These observations will enable us to determine flows of mass and energy, revealing the composition and evolution of celestial objects. JAXA’s Smart Lander for Investigating Moon, or SLIM, mission will fly as a rideshare on this launch, heading to the moon to test precision landing technology. The H-2A rocket will fly in the 202 configuration with two strap-on solid rocket boosters. Delayed from 2nd Quarter after H3 launch failure. Delayed from Aug. 27 and 28.

Updated: September 07

September 8/9 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-14
Launch time: 11:12 p.m. EDT (0312 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, A Shortfall of Gravitas, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: September 09

September 10 Atlas 5 • NROL-107
Launch time: 8:47 a.m. EDT (1247 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket launched the NROL-107 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office. The NROL-107 mission launched a classified payload known as Silentbarker. The mission is a partnership between the NRO and the U.S. Space Force, which have disclosed little information about the payload other than it will focus on satellite threat intelligence and space situational awareness. Delayed from Aug. 29 due to Hurricane Idalia. Delayed from Sept. 9 due to technical issue.

Updated: September 10

September 11/12 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-2
Launch time: 11: 57 p.m. PDT (2:57 a.m. EDT 0647 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: September 12

September 15 Soyuz • Soyuz MS-24
Launch time: 11:44 a.m. EDT (1544 UTC)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-24 spacecraft to the International Space Station. The mission carried Russian commander Oleg Kononenko, Russian flight engineer Nikolai Chub, and NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara into orbit for a long-duration flight on the space station. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration.

Updated: September 15

September 15 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-16
Launch time: 11:38 p.m. EDT (0338 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship “Just Read the Instructions” in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from early morning Sept. 15. Watch live coverage.

Updated: September 16

September 19 Electron • “We Will Never Desert You”
Launch time: 6:55 p.m. NZST (2:55 a.m. EDT / 0655 UTC)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1B, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket lifted off with a next-generation Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Earth-imaging satellites called “Acadia” for Capella Space. it was the second of four planned satellites in this series. The mission was dubbed “We Will Never Desert You”. A launch failure occurred about two and a half minutes into flight. Read more.

Updated: September 19

September 19/20 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-17
Launch time: 11:38 p.m. (0338 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship “A Shortfall of Gravitas” in the Atlantic Ocean. The first stage booster, designated B1060, is now the first to fly for a 17th time.

Updated: September 20

September 23/24 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-18
Launch time: 11:38 p.m. EDT (0338 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship “Just Read the Instructions” in the Atlantic Ocean. This was the 17th launch and landing for the booster tail number 1060.

Updated: September 24

September 25 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-3
Launch time: 1:48 a.m. PDT (4:48 a.m. EDT / 0848 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 21 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: October 06

September 29/30 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-19
Launch time: 10:00 p.m. EDT (0200 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship “A Shortfall of Gravitas” in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: September 30

October 5 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-21
Launch time: 1:36 a.m. EDT (0536 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship “Just Read the Instructions” in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: October 05

October 6 Atlas 5 • Project Kuiper Protoflight
Launch time: 2:06 p.m. EDT (1806 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

The first two demonstration satellites for Amazon’s Project Kuiper broadband constellation launched on an Atlas 5 501 rocket. These satellites were originally scheduled to fly on the first Vulcan rocket.

Updated: October 06

8/9 October Vega • THEOS-2 & FORMOSAT-7R/TRITON
Launch time: 10:36 p.m. local time (9:36 p.m. EDT / 0136 UTC)
Launch site: ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana

Arianespace will launch a Vega rocket, designated VV23, sending a collection of 12 satellites into a sun-synchronous orbit. The main payload is the THailand Earth Observation System-2 (THEOS-2), which is an Earth-observing satellite built by Airbus Defense and Space on behalf of the Kingdom of Thailand. It’s designed to complement THEOS-1, which launched in 20008. The secondary payload is FORMOSAT-7R/TRITON, which was developed by the Taiwanese Space Agency (TASA). Its Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) tool will help meteorologists gather wind data over oceans to help with forecasting the trajectory and intensity of typhoons. Delayed from Oct. 6/7.

Updated: October 09

October 9 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-4
Launch time: 12:43 a.m. PDT (3:43 a.m. EDT / 0743 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 21 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: October 09

October 13 Falcon Heavy • Psyche
Launch time: 10:19 a.m. EDT (1419 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched NASA’s Psyche asteroid mission. The Maxar-built spacecraft will travel to the metallic asteroid Psyche, where it will enter orbit in 2029. This is the first spacecraft to explore a metal-rich asteroid, which may be the leftover core of a protoplanet that began forming in the early solar system more than 4 billion years ago. The Falcon Heavy’s two side boosters returned to Landing Zones 1 and 2 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station for recovery. The center core was expended. Delayed from 2022 due to payload software issues. Moved forward from Oct. 10, 2023. Delayed from Oct. 5. Delayed from Oct. 12 due to weather.

Updated: October 13

October 13 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-22
Launch time: 7:01 p.m. EDT (2301 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship “A Shortfall of Gravitas” in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Oct. 8 by upper level winds.

Updated: October 13

October 17/18 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-23
Launch time: 8:39 p.m. EDT (0039 UTC on Oct. 18)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, Just Read the Instructions, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: October 18

October 21 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-5
Launch time: 1:23 a.m. PDT (4:23 a.m. EDT, 0823 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 21 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: October 21

October 21/22 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-24
Launch time: 10:17 p.m. EDT (0217 UTC on Oct. 22)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship, A Shortfall of Gravitas, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: October 22

October 26 Long March 2F • Shenzhou 17
Launch time: 03:13:59 UTC
Launch site: China Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center (JSLC LC-90)

A three-member crew will launched to the Tiangong Space Station on the Shenzhou 17 mission aboard a Long March 2F Improved (CZ-2F/G Y17) rocket.

Updated: October 26

October 29 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-6
Launch time: 2 a.m. PDT (5 a.m. EDT / 0700 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 22 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: November 14

October 30 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-25
Launch time: 7:20 p.m. EDT (2320 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster was recovered on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean. Scrubbed during Oct. 29 launch attempt.

Updated: October 30

November 3/4 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-26
Launch time: 8:37 p.m. EDT (0037 UTC on Nov. 4)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster was recovered on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean. This was the 18th flight of this booster, B1058.

Updated: November 04

November 8 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-27
Launch time: 12:05 a.m. EST (0505 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster was recovered on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: November 08

November 9 Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 29
Launch time: 8:28:14 p.m. EST (0128:14 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed back at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. The flight is the 29th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Nov. 1. Delayed from Nov. 3, 5 & 7.

Updated: November 10

November 11 Falcon 9 • Transporter 9
Launch time: Approx. 10:49 a.m. PST (2:49 p.m. EST, 1849 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Transporter 9 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with 90 small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. Delayed from Nov. 9.

Updated: November 12

November 12 Falcon 9 • O3b mPOWER 5 & 6
Launch time: 4:08 p.m. EDT (2108 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the third pair of O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites into Medium Earth Orbit for SES of Luxembourg. The satellites, built by Boeing, will provide internet services over most of the populated world, building on SES’s O3b network. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from March, June 9 and Aug. 27.

Updated: November 12

November 18 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-28
Launch time: 12:05:50 p.m. EST (0505:50 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: November 18

November 18 Starship • Integrated Flight Test 2 (IFT-2)
Launch time: 7:00 -7:20 a.m. CST (8 a.m. - 8:20 p.m. EST / 1300-1320 UTC)
Launch site: Starbase, Boca Chica Beach, Texas

A SpaceX Super Heavy booster and Starship vehicle will make a second fully-integrated test flight. The plan is for the Starship to achieve near-orbital velocity mission to travel around the world for nearly one full orbit. Starship will then reenter the atmosphere and splashdown near Hawaii. The Super Heavy booster will target a splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico. There is a 20-minute launch window on Saturday.

Updated: November 19

November 20 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-7
Launch time: 2:30:40 a.m. PST (5:30:40 a.m. EST / 1030:40 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another 22 Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. Launch attempt targeting 1054 UTC on Nov. 19 scrubbed.

Updated: December 05

November 22 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-29
Launch time: 1:47 a.m. EST (0647 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: November 24

November 27/28 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-30
Launch time: 11:20 p.m. EST (0420 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: November 28

December 1 Soyuz • Progress MS-25 / 86P
Launch time: 0925 UTC (4:25 a.m. EST)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 86th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. This mission used a rocket in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration.

Updated: December 01

December 1 Falcon 9 • Korea 425
Launch time: 10:19 a.m. PST (1:19 p.m. EST / 1819 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket launched the 425 Project EO/IR satellite 1 reconnaissance satellite for South Korea and 24 other spacecraft. The South Korean satellite is the first of five missions planned by the country’s Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) for a program known as the ‘425 Project’. This first mission is an optical/infra-red imaging satellite. The four missions to follow will feature synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Also onboard is EIRSAT-1, Ireland’s first satellite, a 2U cubesat which was funded by the Education Office of the European Space Agency. Other payloads include: Space BD’s ISL48, SITAEL’s uHETSat, D-Orbit’s ION SCV Daring Diego, York Space Systems’ Bane, and PlanetIQ’s GNOMES-4. The Falcon 9 first-stage booster returned to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from Nov. 29.

Updated: December 01

December 2/3 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-31
Launch time: 11 p.m. EST (0400 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean. The recovery vessel, ‘Doug,’ was used to scoop up the fairing halves following the launch.

Updated: December 03

December 7 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-33
Launch time: 12:07 a.m. EST (0507 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean. The recovery vessel ‘Bob’ scooped up the fairing halves following the launch.

Updated: December 07

December 8 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-8
Launch time: 12:03:40 a.m. PST (0803:40 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: December 08

NET December 15 Electron • ‘The Moon God Awakens’
Launch time: 0405 UTC (5:05 p.m. NZDT)
Launch site: Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched the QPS-SAR-5, also known as ‘TSUKUYOMI-I’, for the Japan-based Earth-imaging company the Institute for Q-shu Pioneers of Space, Inc. (iQPS). This was the 42nd flight of the Electron rocket and the first since a launch failure in September. Rocket Lab has nicknamed the mission ‘The Moon God Awakens’.

Updated: December 15

December 18/19 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-34
Launch time: 11:01 p.m. EST (0401 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Dec. 10 & 11. Delayed from Dec. 12 due to strong, ground-level winds. Delayed from Dec. 13 due to poor weather in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: December 19

December 22 Alpha • ‘Fly the Lightning’
Launch time: 9:32:30 a.m. PST (12:32:30 p.m. EST, 1732:30 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-2, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

Firefly Aerospace will launch its Alpha rocket on the FTLA004 mission dubbed ‘Fly the Lightning.’ This will be the fourth launch to date of the orbital class rocket. This is a dedicated mission for customer Lockheed Martin. The company will deploy a new wideband Electronically Steerable Antenna (ESA) technology integrated on a Terran Orbital Nebula satellite bus. Delayed from Dec. 20.

Updated: December 22

December 23 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-32
Launch time: 12:33 a.m. EST (0533 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: December 23

December 24 Falcon 9 • SARah 2 & 3
Launch time: 5:11 a.m. PST (8:11 a.m. EST / 1311 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 will launched two satellites with passive synthetic aperture radar reflectors for the German military. The first stage booster making its eighth flight returned to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from Dec. 22.

Updated: December 24

December 28/29 Falcon Heavy • USSF-52
Launch time: 8:07 p.m. EDT (0107 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket launched the USSF 52 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The Falcon Heavy launched the experimental X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle on this mission. This was the seventh flight of this spacecraft on a mission also known as OTV-7. This was the first launch of an X-37B using a Falcon Heavy rocket. Delayed from October 2021 and 2nd Quarter 2022. Delayed from October 2022 and June 23, delayed from July 6, Dec 7, 10, 11 and 12.

Updated: December 29

December 28/29 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-36
Launch time: 11:01 p.m. EST (0401 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: December 29

December 31 / January 1 PSLV-DL • XPoSat & POEM-3
Launch time: 9:10 a.m. IST / 0340 UTC on Jan. 1 (10:40 p.m. EST on Dec. 31)
Launch site: First Launch Pad, SDSC-SHAR, Sriharikota, India

The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) launched the first orbital mission of 2024 using a PSLV-DL rocket. The PSLV-C58/XPosSat mission launched of the X-ray Polarimeter Satellite (XPoSat), described as “India’s first dedicated polarimetry mission to study various dynamics of bright, astronomical X-ray sources in extreme conditions.” Also onboard was the PSLV Orbital Experimental Module-3 (POEM-3), which hosts 10 additional payloads added by both ISRO and the Indian National Space Promotion and Authorization Center (IN-SPACe).

Updated: January 02

January 2/3 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-9
Launch time: 7:44 p.m. PST (10:44 p.m. EST / 0344 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch 21 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The mission included six satellites equipped to provide cellphone coverage. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Dec. 14, 15, 28 and 30.

Updated: January 03

January 3 Falcon 9 • Ovzon3
Launch time: 6:04 p.m. EST (2304 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A Falcon 9 launched a much delayed small geostationary satellite for the Swedish broadband internet provider Ovzon. Originally scheduled to launch on an Ariane 5, the satellite was moved to Falcon 9 due to delayed in manufacturing. Delayed from summer 2023. Delayed from Dec. 15, 16 & 17.

Updated: January 03

January 7 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-35
Launch time: 5:35 p.m. EST (2235 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: January 08

January 8 Vulcan Centaur • Peregrine
Launch time: 2:18 a.m. EST (0718 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket launched on its inaugural flight with the Peregrine commercial lunar lander for Astrobotic. The Peregrine robotic lander carried multiple experiments, scientific instruments, and tech demo payloads for NASA and other customers. The Vulcan Centaur rocket flew in the VC2S configuration with two GEM-63XL solid rocket boosters, a standard-length payload fairing, and two RL10C-1-1A engines on the Centaur 5 upper stage. Delayed from mid-2022 and late 2022. Delayed from 1st Quarter 2023, May 4 and Dec. 24.

Updated: January 08

January 11/12 H-2A 202 • IGS-Optical 8
Launch time: 1:44 p.m. JST (0444 UTC, 11:44 p.m. EST on Jan. 11)
Launch site: Launch Pad 1, Tanegashima Space Center, Japan

The eighth Intelligence Gathering Satellite-Optical (IGS Optical 8) launched on behalf of Japan’s government onboard a H-2A 202, designated H-2A F48 (flight 48). The mission launched from Launch Pad 1 (LA-Y1) at the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. The satellite will head into a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of about 500 km and an inclination of about 97.5 degrees. Delayed from Jan. 11 locally (Jan. 10 in UTC).

Updated: January 15

January 14 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-10
Launch time: 12:59 a.m. PST (3:59 a.m. EST, 0859 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. This was the 18th flight for the first stage booster, tail number B1061. Delayed from Dec. 9, Dec. 11, 12 and 13.

Updated: January 14

January 14/15 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-37
Launch time: 8:52 p.m. EST (0152 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Jan. 13.

Updated: January 15

January 17 Long March 7 • Tianzhou 7
Launch time: 10:27 p.m. BJT (9:27 a.m. EST, 1427 UTC)
Launch site: LC-201, Wenchang Satellite Launch Center, People's Republic of China

A Chinese Long March 7 rocket launched the Tianzhou-7 resupply ship to dock with the Tiangong Space Station. The automated cargo craft was the sixth resupply freighter for the Chinese space station. The cargo included about 90 kg of fresh fruit, according to CGTN.

Updated: January 19

January 18 Falcon 9 • Axiom Mission 3
Launch time: 4:49 p.m. EST (2149 UTC)
Launch site: Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 13th flight with astronauts. The commercial mission, managed by Axiom Space, is commanded by former NASA astronaut, Michael López-Alegría. Three passengers, Walter Villadei, Alper Gezeravci and Marcus Wandt, will fly on this two-week commercial mission to the International Space Station. The first stage booster will return to Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Delayed from Jan. 17.

Updated: January 24

January 23/24 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-11
Launch time: 4:35 p.m. PST (7:35 p.m. EST, 0035 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the drone ship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. This will be the 16th flight for the first stage booster, tail number B1063. Delayed from Jan. 18, 19, 20 and 21. Read more.

Updated: January 24

January 28/29 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-38
Launch time: 8:10 p.m. EST (0110 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas,’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: January 29

January 28/29 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-12
Launch time: 9:57 p.m. PST (12:57 a.m. EST, 0557 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: January 30

January 30 Falcon 9 • NG-20
Launch time: 12:07 p.m. EST (1707 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched Northrop Grumman’s 21st Cygnus cargo freighter on the 20th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-20. The launch vehicle for this mission was changed from Northrop Grumman’s own Antares 230+ rocket to SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine ended engine and booster production for the Antares program. The Falcon 9 first stage booster, B1077, landed back at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Delayed from October. Delayed from Jan. 29.

Updated: January 31

January 31 Electron • ‘Four Of A Kind’
Launch time: 7:34 p.m. NZDT (1:34 a.m. EST, 0634 UTC)
Launch site: Pad B, Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched four LEMUR SSA (space situational awareness) satellites on behalf of Spire Global Inc. and its customer NorthStar Earth & Space. The satellites launched to an inclination of 97 degrees. This was the 43rd Electron launch to date. Rocket Lab said it successfully recovered the first stage booster following stage separation. Delayed from Jan. 18 and 28.

Updated: January 31

February 8 Falcon 9 • PACE
Launch time: 1:33 a.m. EST (0633 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched NASA’s Plankton, Aerosol Cloud Ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission. The spacecraft is equipped with instruments to assess the health of the oceans by measuring the distribution of phytoplankton, tiny plants and algae. The Falcon 9 first stage booster, tail number 1081, landed back at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Delayed from Feb. 6 and 7 due to poor weather.

Updated: February 08

February 9/10 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-13
Launch time: 4:34 p.m. PST (7:34 p.m. EST, 0034 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 3 and 5-8.

Updated: February 10

February 14 Falcon 9 • USSF-124
Launch time: Four-hour launch period opens at 5:30 p.m. EST (2230 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 launched a mission for the U.S. Space Force and Missile Defense Agency. This mission was part of the third order year of the National Security Space Launch (NSSL) contracts for SpaceX. The Falcon 9 first-stage booster landed back at Cape Canaveral.

Updated: February 14

February 14/15 Soyuz • Progress MS-26 / 87P
Launch time: 6:25 a.m. MSK on Feb. 15 (10:25 p.m. EST, 0325 UTC)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the 87th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. This mission used a rocket in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration.

Updated: February 16

NET February 15 Falcon 9 • IM-1
Launch time: 1:05 a.m. EST (0605 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the IM-1 mission with the Nova-C lander built and owned by Intuitive Machines. The IM-1 mission will attempt to deliver a suite of science payloads to the surface of the moon for NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. The Falcon 9 first-stage booster will land back at Cape Canaveral. Delayed from 3rd Quarter of 2022, December 2022, January 2023, March 2023, June 2023, November 2023, January 2024 and February 14.

Updated: February 15

February 15 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-14
Launch time: 1:34 p.m. PST (4:34 p.m. EST, 2134 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 14.

Updated: February 16

February 16/17 H3 • VEP-4
Launch time: 9:22:55 a.m. JST (7:22:55 p.m. EST, 0022:55 UTC)
Launch site: Yoshinobu Launch Complex, JAXA Tanegashima Space Center

The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched a second test flight of its H3 rocket following a failure with the second stage engine in March 2023. The mission is dubbed H3/TF2 (Test Flight No. 2). The flight featured the Vehicle Evaluation Payload-4 (VEP-4) for purposes of the demonstration. JAXA stated in December 2023 that it “will capitalize on the excess launch capability of the H3TF2 by providing launch and orbit insertion opportunities for two small secondary payloads (piggyback payloads), CE-SAT-IE and TIRSAT.” Delayed from Feb. 15 due to poor weather.

Updated: February 17

February 17 GSLV-F14 • INSAT-3DS
Launch time: 5:35 p.m. IST (7:05 a.m. EST, 1205 UTC)
Launch site: SDSC-SHAR, Sriharikota

An Indian Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mk. 2 rocket, designated GSLV-F14, launched the INSAT-3DS satellite for the country’s Ministry of Earth Sciences (MoES). This geostationary meteorological satellite will support the previously launched INSAT-3D and INSAT3DR satellites. The 2275 kg INSAT-3DS satellite is based off of the Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) I-2k satellite bus.

Updated: February 18

February 20 Falcon 9 • Telkomsat HTS 113BT
Launch time: 3:11 p.m. EST (2011 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a telecommunications satellite for Indonesian company, PT Telkom Satelit Indonesia (Telkomsat), a subsidiary of a state-owned telecommunication company, during a two-hour launch window. The satellite will operate at 113° East. The satellite was built on Thales Alenia Space’s Spacebus 4000B2 platform. The first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘Just Read the Instructions,’ about 8.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: February 20

February 22/23 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-15
Launch time: 8:11 p.m. PST (11:11 p.m. EST, 0411 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 21.

Updated: February 23

February 25 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-39
Launch time: 5:06 p.m. EST (2206 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 24 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas,’ in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 24.

Updated: February 25

February 29 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-40
Launch time: 10:30 a.m. EST (1530 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: February 29

March 3/4 Falcon 9 • Crew 8
Launch time: 10:53 p.m. EST (0353 UTC on the 4th)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 13th flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will return to land at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. NASA astronauts Matthew Dominick, Michael Barratt, and Jeanette Epps along with Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Grebenkin launched on the Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea off the coast of Florida. Delayed from Feb. 22, 28, Mar. 1 and 2.

Updated: March 04

March 4 Falcon 9 • Transporter 10
Launch time: 2:05 p.m. PST (5:05 p.m. EST, 2205 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched the Transporter 10 mission, a rideshare flight to a low-Earth orbit with 53 small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. The first stage booster returned to Landing Zone 4 (LZ-4) about 7.5 minutes after launch.

Updated: March 05

March 4 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-41
Launch time: 6:54 p.m. EST (2354 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: March 05

March 10 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-43
Launch time: 7:05 p.m. EDT 2305 UTC
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘Just Read the Instructions,’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: March 10

March 10/11 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-17
Launch time: 9:09 p.m. PDT (12:09 a.m. EDT / 0409 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 23 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: March 27

March 12/13 Electron • ‘Owl Night Long’
Launch time: 4:03 am NZDT (11:03 a.m. EDT, 1503 UTC March 12)
Launch site: Pad B, Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch a dedicated mission for Japan Earth-imaging satellite company, Synspective. The launch of the StriX-3 satellite is the fourth launch in a multi-launch agreement following ‘The Owls’ Night Begins’ in December 2020, ‘The Owl’s Night Continues’ in February 2022 and ‘The Owl Spreads its Wings’ in September 2022. This will be Rocket Lab’s third Electron launch of 2024 and its 45th to date. Delayed from March 10.

Updated: March 12

March 14 Starship • Orbital Flight Test 3 (OFT-3)
Launch time: 8:25 a.m. CDT (9:25 a.m. EDT, 1325 UTC)
Launch site: Starbase, Boca Chica Beach, Texas

A SpaceX Super Heavy booster and Starship vehicle made a third fully-integrated test flight during a 110-minute launch window. The plan was for the Starship to achieve near-orbital before reentering the atmosphere and splashing down in the Indian Ocean. The Super Heavy booster targeted a splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico. The Starship vehicle was lost during reentry and the booster did not make a soft splashdown.

Updated: March 16

March 18/19 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-16
Launch time: 7:28 p.m. PT (10:28 p.m. ET, 0228 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 23 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean.

Updated: March 27

March 15 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-44
Launch time: 8:21 p.m. (0021 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas,’ in the Atlantic Ocean. The payload fairings were recovered by the recovery vessel, ‘Doug.’ Delayed from March 13 and 14.

Updated: March 16

March 19/20 Long March 8 • Queqiao-2
Launch time: 8:31 a.m. BJT (8:31 p.m. ET, 0031 UTC)
Launch site: LC-201, Wenchang Satellite Launch Center, People's Republic of China

China Aerospace Science & Technology Corporation (CASC) launched the Queqiao-2 relay satellite onboard a Long March 8 (ChanZheng-8 Y3 S) rocket. The satellite will travel to a highly elliptical, frozen lunar orbit at an inclination of 55 degrees. Once in orbit, it will help support lunar missions beginning with Chang’e-6. In addition to the primary payload, there will be two small, rideshare satellites called Tiandu-1 and Tiandu-2.

Updated: March 20

March 21 Electron • NROL-123
Launch time: 3:25 a.m. EDT (0725 UTC)
Launch site: Launch Complex 2, Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched its first mission for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) from Launch Complex 2 at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The NROL-123 mission, also known as ‘Live and Let Fly,’ was booked as part of the NRO’s Rapid Acquisition of a Small Rocket (RASR) contract. It launched a classified payload to orbit. Delayed from March 20.

Updated: March 22

March 21 Falcon 9 • CRS-30
Launch time: 4:55 p.m. ET (2055 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed back at Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. The flight is the 30th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. It was also the first launch of a second-generation Dragon to the space station lifting off from SCL-40.

Updated: March 22

March 23 Soyuz • Soyuz MS-25
Launch time: 8:36 a.m. EDT (1236 UTC)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

A Russian government Soyuz rocket launched the crewed Soyuz MS-25 spacecraft to the International Space Station. The mission carried Russian commander Oleg Novitsky, Belarusian flight engineer Marina Vasilevskaya, and NASA astronaut Tracy Dyson into orbit on a flight on the space station. The rocket flew in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. The Soyuz will dock at the Prichal module two days after liftoff. On its return trip, it will bring back Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Nikolai Chub. Scrubbed on March 21

Updated: March 23

March 23/24 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-42
Launch time: 11:09 p.m. EDT (0309 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on the droneship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from March 22.

Updated: March 24

March 25 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-46
Launch time: 7:42 p.m. EDT (2342 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘A Short Fall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean.

Updated: March 26

March 26/27 CASC • Long March 6A
Launch time: 6:51 a.m. CST on March 27 (6:51 p.m. EDT, 2251 UTC on March 26)
Launch site: Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, China

A Long March 6A rocket launched from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in China with Yunhai-3-02 military weather satellites onboard.

Updated: March 27

March 30 Falcon 9 • Eutelsat-36D
Launch time: 5:52 p.m. EDT (2152 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket with the Eutelsat-36D satellite onboard for its customer, Eutelsat Communications. Built by Airbus, the satellite is designed to replace the Eutelsat 36B satellite at its orbital position of 36° East. It will work in tandem with Eutelsat 36C to help deliver “over 1,100 TV channels to millions of homes” in the regions of Africa and Eurasia, according to Eutelsat. The satellite is based on Airbus’ Eurostar Neo platform and features 70 Ku-band transponders.

Updated: March 30

March 30/31 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-45
Launch time: 9:30 p.m. EDT (0130 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on a droneship in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: March 31

March 31 Soyuz • Resurs-P No. 4
Launch time: 12:36 p.m. MSK (5:36 a.m. EDT, 0936 UTC)
Launch site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

Roscosmos launched a Soyuz 2.1b rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Onboard was the Resurs-P No. 4, the fourth in a series of Earth observing, remote sensing satellites.

Updated: March 31

April 1/2 Falcon 9 • Starlink 7-18
Launch time: 7:30 p.m. PDT (10:30 p.m. EDT / 0230 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean. Delayed from March 28, 29 and 30.

Updated: April 02

April 5 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-47
Launch time: 5:12 a.m. EDT (0912 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas,’ in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: April 05

April 6/7 Falcon 9 • Starlink 8-1
Launch time: 7:25 p.m. PDT (10:25 p.m. EDT, 0225 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a batch of 21 Starlink internet satellites from Space Launch Complex 4 East (SLC-4E). The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ in the Pacific Ocean a little more than eight minutes after liftoff. The mission featured the launch of the next six Starlink satellites that include Direct to Cell capabilities. Delayed from April 5.

Updated: April 07

April 7 Falcon 9 • Bandwagon-1
Launch time: 7:16 p.m. EDT (2316 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

The first of SpaceX’s Bandwagon ride-share missions, targeting a low Earth orbit with an inclination of approximately 45.4 degrees. There were 11 spacecraft onboard the Falcon 9. The booster returned for a touchdown at Landing Zone 1 (LZ-1) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station about 7.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: April 07

April 9 Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-70
Launch time: 12:53 p.m. EDT (1653 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket launched a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. This was the final flight of a Delta 4 rocket. Delayed from March 28.

Updated: April 09

April 10 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-48
Launch time: 1:40 a.m. EDT (0540 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster touched down on the droneship ‘Just Read the Instructions’ in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: April 10

April 11 Falcon 9 • USSF-62
Launch time: 7:25 a.m. PDT 10:25 a.m. EDT / 1425 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket launched the USSF-62 mission for the Space Force. The payload is the first Weather System Follow-on Microwave (WSF-M) satellite heading for a sun-synchronous orbit. The first stage booster returned to Vandenberg’s Landing Zone 4.

Updated: April 11

April 12/13 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-49
Launch time: 9:40 p.m. EDT (0140 UTC on 13th)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster, B1062, will return to the droneship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff. This will be the first time a booster launches for a 20th time.

Updated: April 13

April 17 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-51
Launch time: 5:26 p.m. EDT (2126 UTC)
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship, ‘Just Read the Instructions,’ in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: April 18

April 18 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-52
Launch time: 6:40 p.m. EDT (2240 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched another batch of 23 second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster landed on the droneship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff.

Updated: April 18

NET April 23/24 Electron • ‘Beginning Of The Swarm’
Launch time: Window 10:00-11:00 a.m. NZST April 24 (6:00-7:00 p.m. EDT, 2200-2300 UTC on April 23)
Launch site: Pad B, Launch Complex 1, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch a pair of satellites on behalf of both NASA and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). KAIST’s NEONSAT-1 is the primary payload and is described as “an Earth observation satellite with a high-resolution optical camera designed to monitor for natural disasters along the Korean Peninsula by pairing its images with artificial intelligence.” Additional NEOSAT satellites will be launched n 2026 and 2027. NASA’s Advanced Composite Solar Sail System (ACS3) is the secondary payload. It’s a technology demonstration that is geared to show off materials that can be used for solar sail propulsion. NASA “plans to test the deployment of new composite booms that will unfurl the solar sail to measure approximately 30 feet per side, or about the size of a small apartment in total. Flight data obtained during the demonstration will be used for designing future larger-scale composite solar sail systems for space weather early warning satellites, asteroid and other small body reconnaissance missions, and missions to observe the polar regions of the sun.”

Updated: April 19

April 23/24 Falcon 9 • Starlink 6-53
Launch time: Window runs from 6:15 - 8:40 p.m. EDT (2215-0040 UTC)
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of second-generation Starlink V2 Mini internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a droneship in the Atlantic Ocean about 8.5 minutes after liftoff. Delayed from April 22.

Updated: April 22

April 24 Falcon 9 • WorldView Legion 1 & 2
Launch time: Window opens 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT / 1830 GMT)
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first pair of WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. Maxar plans to deploy six commercial WorldView Legion high-resolution remote sensing satellites into a mix of sun-synchronous and mid-inclination orbits on three SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. The first stage of the Falcon 9 will return to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg Space Force Base for landing. Delayed from April, June 2023 an April 17, 2024.

Updated: April 19

NET May 4 Eris • TestFlight1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:

Gilmour Space in Australia is preparing to launch the inaugural flight of its Eris Block 1 rocket. The three-stage launch vehicle is 25 m (82 ft) tall and is equipped with 1.5 m (4.9 ft) diameter payload fairings. The rocket is designed to send up to 305 kg up to low Earth orbit. This first mission, called “TestFlight1,” does not appear to have a payload on board.

Updated: April 19

NET May 6/7 Atlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test
Launch time: 10:34 p.m. ET (0234 UTC on the 7th)
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-085, will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crew Test Flight, to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will fly on the mission. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August and 1st Quarter of 2020. Delayed from mid-2020 after Boeing decision to refly the Orbital Flight Test. Delayed from early 2021, June 2021, and late 2021. Delayed from late 2022 to implement fixes on the Starliner spacecraft after OFT-2. Delayed from April 2023, July 2023 and April 2024.

Updated: April 06

June 24 Long March 2C • SVOM
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: Xichang Satellite Launch Center, People's Republic of China

A Chinese Long March 2C rocket will launch the Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) spacecraft. The satellite is a dual Franco-Chinese mission, which is “dedicated to the study of the most distant explosions of stars, the gamma-ray bursts.”  There are four main instruments on board, two of which are French and two which are Chinese. The spacecraft will be launched to a 625-km Earth orbit and will operate for at least three years with an option to extend for another two years beyond that. Delayed from late 2023.

Updated: January 28

June 25 Falcon Heavy • GOES U
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy will launch the fourth and final satellite of the next-generation series of geostationary weather satellites for NASA and NOAA. GOES-U will orbit 22,300 miles above the equator to monitor weather conditions across the United States. The satellite will be renamed GOES-19 once it reaches its operational orbit. Delayed from April 30 and May.

Updated: March 26

Second Quarter Vulcan Centaur • Dream Chaser 1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket will launch on its second demonstration flight with Sierra Space’s Dream Chaser cargo vehicle for the International Space Station. The Dream Chaser is a lifting body resupply spacecraft that will launch on top of a rocket and land on a runway. This will be the Dream Chaser’s first flight to space. The Vulcan Centaur rocket will fly in the VC4L configuration with four GEM-63XL solid rocket boosters, a long-length payload fairing, and two RL10 engines on the Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August 2022, December 2023, January 2024 and April 2024.

Updated: March 26

Summer 2024 Falcon 9 • ASBM
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Arctic Satellite Broadband Mission, consisting of two satellites owned by Space Norway. The Falcon 9 will launch the two Northrop Grumman-built satellites into a highly elliptical orbit that lingers over the Arctic region. The satellites carry communications payloads for the Norwegian Ministry of Defense, the U.S. Space Force, and Inmarsat.

Updated: December 13

NET July 8 Falcon 9 • Türksat 6A
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Türksat 6A communications satellite for the Turkish operator Türksat. Türksat 6A is the first geostationary communications satellite to be built in Turkey, with development led by TÜBİTAK Space Technologies Research Institute and Turkish Aerospace Industries. Delayed from 2nd Quarter 2023 and March 2024.

Updated: March 25

NET Summer Falcon 9 • Polaris Dawn
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft. The Polaris Dawn mission will be commanded by billionaire Jared Isaacman, making his second trip to space. He will be joined on the all-private mission by pilot Scott “Kidd” Poteet, and SpaceX employees Sarah Gillis and Anna Menon. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from November and December 2022, March 2023 and April 2024.

Updated: February 08

3rd Quarter Falcon 9 • BlueBird Block 1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch five 700-square-foot Block 1 BlueBird satellites on behalf of its customer, AST SpaceMobile, Inc.

Updated: April 02