September 25, 2022

Photos: Firefly’s second Alpha rocket raised on launch pad

These photos show Firefly Aerospace’s second Alpha rocket as it was raised on its launch pad at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California on Sept. 10, and again on Sept. 12 after the first launch attempt for the mission. Photographers captured these views as Firefly prepared the rocket for a planned test flight carrying seven small satellites into orbit.

The 96.7-foot-tall (29.5-meter) Alpha rocket is designed to carry more than a half-ton of payload mass into a polar sun-synchronous orbit. The launch window each day opens at 3 p.m. PDT (6 p.m. EDT; 2200 GMT).

The Alpha rocket will blast off from Space Launch Complex 2-West at Vandenberg, a facility previously used for United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket missions. The last Delta 2 rocket launched from there in 2018, and the site is now leased by Firefly Aerospace.

See our Mission Status Center for live countdown and launch coverage.

Credit: Gene Blevins/LA Daily News
Credit: Gene Blevins/LA Daily News
Firefly’s 95-foot-tall Alpha launch vehicle is raised vertical Saturday on Space Launch Complex-2 West at Vandenberg Space Force Base, California. Credit: Gene Blevins/LA Daily News
Firefly’s Alpha launch vehicle stands on its launch pad at Vandenberg Space Force Base on Sept. 10. Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS TAKEN SEPT. 12 BEFORE SECOND LAUNCH ATTEMPT

Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now
Credit: Brian Sandoval / Spaceflight Now

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