September 27, 2022

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Sept. 24: Space Launch System/Artemis 1 delayed
Sept. 22: Updating time for Delta 4-Heavy/NROL-91; Adding date and time for Falcon 9/Starlink 4-35; Adding date and window for Alpha/Demo Flight 2; Adding window for Atlas 5/SES 20 & SES 21; Adding Electron/GAzelle; Antares/NG-18 delayed; Adding GSLV Mk.3/OneWeb 14; Falcon 9/Polaris Dawn delayed; Adding Falcon 9/Crew 6; Adding Soyuz 69S
Sept. 17: Falcon 9/Starlink 4-34 scrubbed
Sept. 16: Falcon 9/Starlink 4-34 scrubbed; Alpha/Demo Flight 2 delayed; Falcon 9/Starlink 4-35 delayed; Falcon 9/Starlink 4-36 delayed; Falcon 9/SDA Tranche 0 delayed
Sept. 15: Falcon 9/Starlink 4-34 scrubbed

Sept. 24Delta 4-Heavy • NROL-91
Launch time: 2153 GMT (5:53 p.m. EDT; 2:53 p.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-6, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office, the U.S. government’s spy satellite agency. This will be the final Delta 4 launch from Vandenberg Space Force Base. Delayed from August. [Sept. 22]
Sept. 24Falcon 9 • Starlink 4-35
Launch time: 2332 GMT (7:32 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with another batch of Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Sept. 19 in ripple effect from Starlink 4-34 delays. [Sept. 22]
TBDSpace Launch System • Artemis 1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket will launch on its first test flight with an uncrewed Orion spacecraft. The mission, known as Artemis 1, will place the Orion spacecraft into orbit around the moon before the capsule returns to Earth for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Ten small CubeSat rideshare payloads will also launch on the Artemis 1 mission. Delayed from February, March, April, May, and June. Scrubbed on Aug. 29 by engine cooling issue. Scrubbed on Sept. 3 by hydrogen leak. Delayed from no earlier than Sept. 23 to allow more time to prepare for tanking test. Delayed from Sept. 27 due to threat from potential Hurricane Ian. [Sept. 24]
Late SeptemberFalcon 9 • Starlink 4-36
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with another batch of Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Sept. 26 in ripple effect from Starlink 4-34 delays. [Sept. 16]
Sept. 30Alpha • Demo Flight 2
Launch window: 0701-0900 GMT (3:01-5:00 a.m. EDT; 12:01-2:00 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-2W, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A Firefly Alpha rocket will launch on its second test flight with a rideshare payload consisting of multiple small satellites. Delayed from May. Scrubbed due to drop in helium pressure on Sept. 11 and scrubbed due to bad weather on Sept. 12. Delayed from Sept. 19 due to poor weather forecast and range unavailability. [Sept. 22]
Sept. 30Atlas 5 • SES 20 & SES 21
Launch window: 2136-2216 GMT (5:36-6:16 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the SES 20 and SES 21 communications satellites for SES of Luxembourg. SES 20 and 21 will provide C-band television and data services over the United States. The rocket will fly in the 531 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters, and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August. [Sept. 22]
Oct. 3Falcon 9 • Crew 5
Launch time: 1645 GMT (12:45 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its eighth flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. NASA astronauts Nicole Mann, Josh Cassada, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata, and Russian cosmonaut Anna Kikina will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from Sept. 1 after first stage booster was damaged during transport. Delayed from Sept. 29. [Aug. 31]
Oct. 5Electron • GAzelle
Launch time: 1704 GMT (1:04 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Launch Complex 1B, Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand
A Rocket Lab Electron rocket will launch the GAzelle small satellite, formerly known as Orbital Test Bed 3, for General Atomics. The GAzelle satellite carries the Argos 4 Advanced Data Collection System payload for NOAA, the U.S. Space Force, and the French space agency CNES. Argos 4 is the latest mission in the international Argos program, a satellite-based system that captures, processes and distributes environmental data — ranging from atmospheric pressure and sea surface temperatures to wildlife monitoring and marine animal tracking — from fixed and mobile platforms around the world. Rocket Lab does not plan to recover the first stage booster on this mission. [Sept. 22]
Oct. 5/6Falcon 9 • Galaxy 33 & 34
Launch window: 2307-0014 GMT on 5th/6th (7:07-8:14 p.m. EDT on 5th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Galaxy 33 and Galaxy 34 commercial communications satellites for Intelsat. Built by Northrop Grumman, Galaxy 33 and Galaxy 34 will be positioned in geostationary orbit to provide C-band video and television broadcast services in the United States. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Sept. 13]
OctoberFalcon 9 • Starlink 4-29
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with another batch of Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. [Sept. 13]
Oct. 13/14Falcon 9 • Hotbird 13F
Launch window: 0325-0524 GMT on 14th (11:25 p.m.-1:24 a.m. EDT on 13th/14th)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Hotbird 13F television broadcasting satellite for Eutelsat. Hotbird 13F is the first satellite to be built on Airbus’s new Eurostar Neo all-electric spacecraft design, and will provide television broadcast services to Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Sept. 13]
OctoberFalcon 9 • Starlink 4-37
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with another batch of Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Sept. 13]
OctoberGSLV Mk.3 • OneWeb 14
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) will launch 36 satellites into orbit for OneWeb, which is developing a constellation of hundreds of satellites in low Earth orbit for low-latency broadband communications. This is the first launch of OneWeb satellites since the suspension of launches on Soyuz rockets following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. [Sept. 22]
Oct. 26Soyuz • Progress 82P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 82nd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. [March 25]
OctoberLong March 5B • Mengtian
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5B rocket will launch the Mengtian laboratory module, the third major element of China’s space station in low Earth orbit. [April 20]
OctoberFalcon Heavy • USSF 44
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 44 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The mission is expected to deploy two spacecraft payloads directly into geosynchronous orbit, one of which is the military’s TETRA 1 microsatellite. The Falcon Heavy’s two side boosters will land on drone ships in the Atlantic Ocean, and the core stage will be expended. Delayed from late 2020, 2nd quarter of 2021, July 2021, and October 2021 by payload issues. Delayed from early 2022 and June 2022. [Sept. 1]
TBDStarship • Orbital Test Flight
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Starbase, Boca Chica Beach, Texas
A SpaceX Super Heavy and Starship launch vehicle will launch on its first orbital test flight. The mission will attempt to travel around the world for nearly one full orbit, resulting in a re-entry and splashdown of the Starship near Hawaii. Delayed from early 2022. [March 9]
Nov. 1Atlas 5 • JPSS 2 & LOFTID
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch Joint Polar Satellite System 2, or JPSS 2, polar-orbiting weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. Built by Northrop Grumman, JPSS 2 will provide global weather observations for medium and long-term forecasts. The Atlas 5 will also launch the Low-Earth Orbit Flight Test of an Inflatable Decelerator, or LOFTID, re-entry aeroshell vehicle on a test flight. LOFTID is a joint project between NASA and ULA. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters, and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Sept. 30 due to anomaly during testing of the satellite’s Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, or VIIRS, instrument. [June 3]
NET Nov. 6Antares • NG-18
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 19th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 18th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-18. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230+ configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from Aug. 15 and Oct. 15. [Sept. 22]
4th QuarterFalcon 9 • WorldView Legion 1 & 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first two WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. Maxar plans to deploy six commercial WorldView Legion high-resolution remote sensing satellites into a mix of sun-synchronous and mid-inclination orbits on three SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. Delayed from January and September 2021. Delayed from March, May, June, July, and September 2022. [Aug. 15]
4th QuarterFalcon 9 • Hotbird 13G
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Hotbird 13G television broadcasting satellite for Eutelsat. Hotbird 13G is the second satellite to be built on Airbus’s new Eurostar Neo all-electric spacecraft design, and will provide television broadcast services to Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Sept. 13]
NET NovemberFalcon 9 • O3b mPOWER 1 & 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first two O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites into Medium Earth Orbit for SES of Luxembourg. The satellites, built by Boeing, will provide internet services over most of the populated world, building on SES’s O3b network. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from May, June, and August. [Sept. 1]
Nov. 18Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 26
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon 2 spacecraft on its sixth cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The flight is the 26th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from October. [Aug. 31]
NET NovemberFalcon 9 • Eutelsat 10B
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Eutelsat 10B communications satellite for Eutelsat. Based on the Spacebus Neo platform built by Thales Alenia Space, Eutelsat 10B will provide maritime and in-flight broadband, data, and video connectivity to customers in the Americas, the Atlantic Ocean, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will either be expended or land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Sept. 13]
Nov. 21Vega-C • Pléiades Neo 5 & 6
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega-C rocket will launch the Pléiades Neo 5 and 6 Earth observation satellites for Airbus. Pléiades Neo 5 and 6 are the third and fourth members of the four-satellite Pléiades Neo constellation built, owned, and operated by Airbus. [Sept. 9]
TBDSSLV • BlackSky Global
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its first commercial mission with four Earth observation satellites for BlackSky Global, a Seattle-based company. The rideshare mission for BlackSky is being arranged by Spaceflight. Delayed from November, late 2019 and early 2020. Delayed from early 2021 and July. [March 31]
4th QuarterFalcon Heavy • USSF 67
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 67 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The mission will launch an unspecified military payload on this mission. [March 25]
4th QuarterFalcon Heavy • ViaSat 3 Americas
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the ViaSat 3 Americas broadband communications satellite. ViaSat 3 Americas is the first of at least three new-generation Boeing-built geostationary satellites for ViaSat. A small communications satellite named Arcturus will launch as a secondary payload for Astranis. Delayed from 3rd Quarter. [Aug. 15]
Dec. 5Falcon 9 • SWOT
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission for NASA. SWOT is a science mission jointly developed by NASA and CNES, the French space agency, to measure how much water is in Earth’s oceans, lakes, and rivers. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. [Aug. 31]
DecemberAriane 5 • Galaxy 35, Galaxy 36, and MTG-I1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA259, to launch the Galaxy 35 and 36 communications satellites for Intelsat, and the MTG-I1 weather satellite for Eumetsat. Galaxy 35 and 36, built by Maxar, will provide C-band television and video broadcast services over the United States. The first Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite, MTG-I1, will provide weather imagery over Europe for the European weather satellite agency, Eumetsat. [Sept. 9]
4th QuarterFalcon 9 • GPS 3 SV06
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the U.S. Space Force’s sixth third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The satellite was built by Lockheed Martin. [March 25]
TBDFalcon Heavy • USSF 52
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 52 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The mission will launch an unspecified military payload on this mission. Delayed from October 2021 and 2nd Quarter 2022. Delayed from October. [Aug. 15]
TBDFalcon 9 • SES 18 & SES 19
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch SES 18 and SES 19 communications satellites for SES of Luxembourg. SES 18 and 19, built by Northrop Grumman, will provide C-band television and data services over the United States. [May 24]
DecemberFalcon 9 • Transporter 6
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Transporter 6 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with numerous small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. Delayed from October and November. [Sept. 9]
DecemberFalcon 9 • SDA Tranche 0
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch around 10 Tranche 0 demonstration satellites for the U.S. military’s Space Development Agency. The launch is the first of two Falcon 9 missions to carry SDA demonstration spacecraft for a future constellation of military missile tracking and data relay satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will return to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from Sept. 24. Delayed from Sept. 29 by payload supply chain issues. [Sept. 16]
Late 2022Vulcan Centaur • Peregrine
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket will launch on its inaugural flight with the Peregrine commercial lunar lander for Astrobotic. The Peregrine robotic lander will carry multiple experiments, scientific instruments, and tech demo payloads for NASA and other customers. The Vulcan Centaur rocket will fly in the VC2S configuration with two GEM-63XL solid rocket boosters, a short-length payload fairing, and two RL10 engines on the Centaur upper stage. Delayed from mid-2022. [March 25]
JanuaryFalcon 9 • IM-1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the IM-1 mission with the Nova-C lander built and owned by Intuitive Machines. The IM-1 mission will attempt to deliver a suite of science payloads to the surface of the moon for NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. Delayed from 3rd Quarter of 2022 and December 2022. [Sept. 9]
FebruaryAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crew Test Flight, to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Mike Fincke, along with an unidentified third crew member, will fly on the mission. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August and 1st Quarter of 2020. Delayed from mid-2020 after Boeing decision to refly the Orbital Flight Test. Delayed from early 2021, June 2021, and late 2021. Delayed from late 2022 to implement fixes on the Starliner spacecraft after OFT-2. [Aug. 31]
FebruaryFalcon 9 • Crew 6
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s ninth flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. NASA astronauts Stephen Bowen, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, UAE astronaut Sultan Al Neyadi, and Russian cosmonaut Andrey Fedyaev will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. [Sept. 22]
MarchFalcon 9 • Polaris Dawn
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 10th flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The Polaris Dawn mission will be commanded by billionaire Jared Isaacman, making his second trip to space. He will be joined on the all-private mission by pilot Scott “Kidd” Poteet, and SpaceX employees Sarah Gillis and Anna Menon. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from November and December. [Sept. 22]
MarchSoyuz • ISS 69S
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz MS-23 spacecraft to the International Space Station with the next team of three cosmonauts and astronauts to live and work on the complex. The crew is led by commander Oleg Kononenko, who will be joined by Russian flight engineer Nikolai Chub and NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. [Sept. 22]
Spaceflight Now