February 5, 2023

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned orbital missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Jan. 31: Falcon 9/Starlink 5-2 delayed; Adding time for Falcon 9/Amazonas Nexus; Adding Falcon 9/Starlink 5-4; Adding date for Falcon 9/Inmarsat 6 F2
Jan. 30: Falcon 9/Starlink 2-6 delayed
Jan. 29: Falcon 9/Starlink 2-6 delayed; Falcon 9/Starlink 5-3 delayed
Jan. 24: H-2A/IGS Radar 7 delayed; Updating time for Falcon 9/Starlink 5-2; Adding date and time for Falcon 9/Starlink 2-6
Jan. 22: Electron/”Virginia is for Launch Lovers” delayed; Falcon 9/Starlink 5-2 delayed

Feb. 2Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-3
Launch time: 0743 GMT (2:43 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of 53 Starlink internet satellites. This will be the third launch into a new orbital shell for SpaceX’s second-generation Starlink constellation, called Starlink Gen2. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 1. [Jan. 31]
Feb. 5Falcon 9 • Amazonas Nexus
Launch time: 2232 GMT (5:32 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Amazonas Nexus communications satellite for the Spanish company Hispasat. Amazonas Nexus will provide broadband connectivity to airplanes, ships, and other mobile users across the Americas, Greenland, and travel corridors across the Atlantic Ocean. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The satellite was built by Thales Alenia Space, and is based on the Spacebus NEO platform. [Jan. 31]
FebruarySSLV • Test Flight 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch on its second orbital test flight following a failed inaugural launch attempt in 2022. [March 31]
Feb. 9Soyuz • Progress 83P
Launch time: 0651 GMT (1:51 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 83rd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. [Jan. 13]
Feb. 11Falcon 9 • Starlink 5-4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of Starlink internet satellites. This will be the fourth launch into a new orbital shell for SpaceX’s second-generation Starlink constellation, called Starlink Gen2. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. Delayed from Feb. 1. [Jan. 31]
Feb. 11/12H3 • ALOS 3
Launch window: 0137:55-0144:15 GMT on 12th (8:37:55-8:44:15 p.m. EST on 11th)
Launch site:
Launch Pad 2, Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H3 rocket will launch on its first test flight with the Advanced Land Observing Satellite 3, or ALOS 3, Earth observation satellite for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. ALOS 3, also named Daichi 3, will capture high-resolution, wide-swath images of all of the world’s land surfaces, providing data for applications in disaster management, land use, urban sprawl, scientific research, and coastal and vegetation environmental monitoring. The H3 rocket for Test Flight 1, or TF1, will fly in the H3-22S configuration with two first stage engines, two strap-on solid rocket boosters, and a short payload fairing. [Jan. 13]
Feb. 19/20Soyuz • Soyuz MS-23
Launch time: 0157 GMT on 20th (8:57 p.m. EST on 19th)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the uncrewed Soyuz MS-23 spacecraft to the International Space Station. The mission was originally supposed to carry Russian commander Oleg Kononenko, Russian flight engineer Nikolai Chub, and NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara, but managers removed the crew from the mission in order to use the Soyuz MS-23 spacecraft as a replacement for the damaged Soyuz MS-22 spacecraft docked to the space station. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. [Jan. 13]
Feb. 18Falcon 9 • Inmarsat 6 F2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Inmarsat 6 F2 communications satellite for London-based Inmarsat. Built by Airbus Defense and Space, the satellite carries L-band and Ka-band payloads to provide mobile communications services to airplanes and ships. [Jan. 31]
Feb. 26Falcon 9 • Crew 6
Launch time: 0707 GMT (2:07 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s ninth flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. NASA astronauts Stephen Bowen, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, UAE astronaut Sultan Al Neyadi, and Russian cosmonaut Andrey Fedyaev will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from Feb. 19. [Jan. 19]
Late FebruaryFalcon 9 • O3b mPOWER 3 & 4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the second pair of O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites into Medium Earth Orbit for SES of Luxembourg. The satellites, built by Boeing, will provide internet services over most of the populated world, building on SES’s O3b network. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Jan. 13]
Early 2023Falcon 9 • SES 18 & SES 19
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch SES 18 and SES 19 communications satellites for SES of Luxembourg. SES 18 and 19, built by Northrop Grumman, will provide C-band television and data services over the United States. [May 24]
1st QuarterFalcon 9 • WorldView Legion 1 & 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first two WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. Maxar plans to deploy six commercial WorldView Legion high-resolution remote sensing satellites into a mix of sun-synchronous and mid-inclination orbits on three SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. Delayed from January and September 2021. Delayed from March, May, June, July, and September 2022. Delayed again from 4th Quarter 2022. Delayed from January 2023. [Jan. 8]
1st QuarterVulcan Centaur • Peregrine
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket will launch on its inaugural flight with the Peregrine commercial lunar lander for Astrobotic. The Peregrine robotic lander will carry multiple experiments, scientific instruments, and tech demo payloads for NASA and other customers. The Vulcan Centaur rocket will fly in the VC2S configuration with two GEM-63XL solid rocket boosters, a short-length payload fairing, and two RL10 engines on the Centaur upper stage. Delayed from mid-2022 and late 2022. [Oct. 26]
FebruaryAriane 5 • Syracuse 4B & Heinrich Hertz
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA259, to launch the Syracuse 4B and Heinrich Hertz communications satellites. Syracuse 4B, built by Airbus, will relay secure communications between French military aircraft, ground vehicles, and naval vessels, including submarines. The Heinrich Hertz satellite, built by OHB, will test new communications technologies on a mission funded by the German government. The small Ovzon 3 geostationary communications satellite for the Swedish company Ovzon will also be on this launch. [Nov. 22]
NET Late FebruaryStarship • Orbital Test Flight
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Starbase, Boca Chica Beach, Texas
A SpaceX Super Heavy and Starship launch vehicle will launch on its first orbital test flight. The mission will attempt to travel around the world for nearly one full orbit, resulting in a re-entry and splashdown of the Starship near Hawaii. Delayed from 2022. [Jan. 8]
March 7Falcon 9 • Intelsat 40e/TEMPO
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Intelsat 40e communications satellite for Intelsat. Intelsat 40e will join Intelsat’s “Epic” fleet of high-throughput satellites, providing in-flight connectivity and other mobile communications services over North and Central America. Intelsat 40e is a partial replacement for Intelsat 29e, which failed in 2019. Intelsat 40e hosts NASA’s Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument to measure atmospheric chemistry and monitor air pollution over North America. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The satellite was built by Maxar, and is based on the 1300 platform. [Jan. 14]
March 11Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 27
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The flight is the 27th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. [Jan. 19]
MarchFalcon 9 • Polaris Dawn
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 10th flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The Polaris Dawn mission will be commanded by billionaire Jared Isaacman, making his second trip to space. He will be joined on the all-private mission by pilot Scott “Kidd” Poteet, and SpaceX employees Sarah Gillis and Anna Menon. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. Delayed from November and December. [Sept. 22]
NET MarchFalcon Heavy • ViaSat 3 Americas
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the ViaSat 3 Americas broadband communications satellite. ViaSat 3 Americas is the first of at least three new-generation Boeing-built geostationary satellites for ViaSat. A small communications satellite named Arcturus will launch as a secondary payload for Astranis. Delayed from 3rd Quarter and December 2022. Delayed from January 2023. [Jan. 8]
MarchFalcon 9 • SDA Tranche 0
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Space Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch around 10 Tranche 0 demonstration satellites for the U.S. military’s Space Development Agency. The launch is the first of two Falcon 9 missions to carry SDA demonstration spacecraft for a future constellation of military missile tracking and data relay satellites. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will return to Landing Zone 4 at Vandenberg. Delayed from Sept. 24. Delayed from Sept. 29 by payload supply chain issues. Delayed from January due to satellite issue. [Dec. 7]
MarchFalcon 9 • IM-1
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the IM-1 mission with the Nova-C lander built and owned by Intuitive Machines. The IM-1 mission will attempt to deliver a suite of science payloads to the surface of the moon for NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. Delayed from 3rd Quarter of 2022, December 2022, and January 2023. [Oct. 26]
MarchDelta 4-Heavy • NROL-68
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The largest of the Delta 4 family, the Heavy version features three Common Booster Cores mounted together to form a triple-body rocket. This is the penultimate flight of a Delta 4 rocket. [Oct. 26]
Early 2023Falcon 9 • WorldView Legion 3 & 4
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the second pair of WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. Maxar plans to deploy six commercial WorldView Legion high-resolution remote sensing satellites into a mix of sun-synchronous and mid-inclination orbits on three SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. [Nov. 22]
Late MarchFalcon 9 • O3b mPOWER 5 & 6
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the third pair of O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites into Medium Earth Orbit for SES of Luxembourg. The satellites, built by Boeing, will provide internet services over most of the populated world, building on SES’s O3b network. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. [Jan. 13]
AprilFalcon 9 • Transporter 7
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Vandenberg Space Force Base, California, or Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Transporter 7 mission, a rideshare flight to a sun-synchronous orbit with numerous small microsatellites and nanosatellites for commercial and government customers. [Jan. 13]
2nd QuarterFalcon Heavy • USSF 52
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 52 mission for the U.S. Space Force. The Falcon Heavy will launch an unspecified military payload on this mission. Delayed from October 2021 and 2nd Quarter 2022. Delayed from October. [Oct. 26]
NET April 5Ariane 5 • JUICE
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA261, to launch the European Space Agency’s Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer mission, or JUICE. The JUICE spacecraft, built by Airbus, will make detailed observations of the giant gas planet and its three large ocean-bearing moons — Ganymede, Callisto and Europa — with a suite of remote sensing, geophysical and in situ instruments. JUICE will enter orbit around Jupiter in July 2031. This will mark the final launch of Europe’s Ariane 5 rocket. [Nov. 22]
AprilAntares • NG-19
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch the 20th Cygnus cargo freighter on the 19th operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as NG-19. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230+ configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. This will be the final flight of an Antares 230+ rocket before a redesign with new U.S.-made engines. Delayed from March. [Jan. 13]
AprilAtlas 5 • CST-100 Starliner Crew Flight Test
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-085, will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crew Test Flight, to the International Space Station. The capsule will dock with the space station, then return to Earth to landing in the Western United States. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will fly on the mission. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration with two solid rocket boosters and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from August and 1st Quarter of 2020. Delayed from mid-2020 after Boeing decision to refly the Orbital Flight Test. Delayed from early 2021, June 2021, and late 2021. Delayed from late 2022 to implement fixes on the Starliner spacecraft after OFT-2. [Nov. 22]
2nd QuarterAtlas 5 • USSF 51
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-101, will launch the USSF 51 mission for the U.S. Space Force. This mission will launch an undisclosed payload for the military. [Oct. 26]
MayFalcon 9 • Axiom Mission 2
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 11th flight with astronauts. The commercial mission, managed by Axiom Space, is commanded by former NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson. Paying passengers John Shoffner will serve as pilot of the mission. Two commercial space fliers from Saudi Arabia will also be on the approximately two-week mission to the space station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea off the coast of Florida. [Oct. 26]
MaySoyuz • Progress 84P
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 84th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration. [Jan. 13]
JuneFalcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 28
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. The flight is the 28th mission by SpaceX conducted under a Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. [Jan. 13]
SummerAtlas 5 • ViaSat 3 EMEA
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-100, will launch launch the ViaSat 3 EMEA broadband communications satellite. ViaSat 3 Americas is the second of at least three new-generation Boeing-built geostationary satellites for Viasat. ViaSat EMEA will cover the Europe, Middle East, and Africa regions. [Nov. 22]
3rd QuarterFalcon 9 • Euclid
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Euclid mission for the European Space Agency. Euclid is an astrophysics mission with a telescope and two scientific instruments designed to explore the evolution of the dark universe. It will make a 3D-map of the universe by observing billions of galaxies out to 10 billion light-years, across more than a third of the sky. Euclid will be launched to an observing orbit at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. The mission was originally supposed to launch on a Russian Soyuz rocket. [Jan. 13]
AugustFalcon 9 • Crew 7
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program’s 12th flight with astronauts. The Falcon 9’s first stage booster will land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean. NASA astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, European Space Agency astronaut Andreas Mogensen, Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and Russian cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon will return to a splashdown at sea. [Jan. 13]
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