September 30, 2016

Launch Schedule

A regularly updated listing of planned missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time. “NET” stands for no earlier than. “TBD” means to be determined. Recent updates appear in red type. Please send any corrections, additions or updates by e-mail to: sclark@spaceflightnow.com.

See our Launch Log for a listing of completed space missions since 2004.

Latest changes:

Sept. 21: Updating time for PSLV/ScatSat 1; Atlas 5/WorldView 4 delayed; Adding NET date for Antares/OA-5; Delta 4/WGS 8 delayed
Sept. 18: Atlas 5/WorldView 4 scrubbed; Soyuz 48S delayed; Vega/Gokturk 1 moved forward
Sept. 16: Atlas 5/WorldView 4 scrubbed; Adding time for PSLV/ScatSat 1; Adding Long March 2D/HXMT; Adding time for Soyuz 49S; Adding Long March 2D/TanSat; Adding GSLV Mk.3/GSAT 19; Adding Vega/Sentinel 3B; Adding Atlas 5/TDRS M; Adding Vega/Optsat 3000 & Venus
Sept. 13: Adding date and time for Long March 2F/Tiangong 2; Changing Falcon 9 launches to TBD; Antares/OA-6 delayed; Atlas 5/SBIRS GEO 3 delayed; Long March 5/Maiden Flight delayed; Falcon Heavy/Demo Flight delayed; Falcon 9/Crew Dragon Demo delayed
Sept. 5: Adjusting time for GSLV/Insat 3DR; Atlas 5/WorldView 4 delayed; Adding date and time for H-2A/Himawari 9; Proton/EchoStar 21 delayed; Adding timeframe for H-2B/HTV 6; Adding Soyuz/Kanopus-V-IK; Delta 4/WGS 9 delayed

Sept. 25/26PSLV • ScatSat 1
Launch time: 0342 GMT on 26th (11:42 p.m. EDT on 25th)
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), flying on the PSLV-C35 mission, will launch India’s ScatSat 1 spacecraft designed to aid tropical cyclone forecasting. A collection of smaller secondary payloads from India, the United States and Algeria will also be aboard the launch. Delayed from July, early August and late August. [Sept. 21]
TBDAtlas 5 • WorldView 4
Launch window: 1830-1845 GMT (2:30-2:45 p.m. EDT; 11:30-11:45 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-062, will launch the WorldView 4 Earth observation satellite for DigitalGlobe. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from June 29 and Sept. 15. Scrubbed on Sept. 16. Delayed from Sept. 26. [Sept. 21]
Oct. 4Ariane 5 • Sky Muster 2 & GSAT 18
Launch window: 2030-2145 GMT (4:30-5:45 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA231, to launch the Sky Muster 2 (NBN Co 1B) and GSAT 18 communications satellites. The Sky Muster 2 satellite will provide high-speed Internet services for Australia’s National Broadband Network. GSAT 18 is a multipurpose communications satellite for the Indian Space Research Organization. Sky Muster 2 replaced Japan’s Superbird 8 satellite on the mission after it was damaged during transport to the launch site. Delayed from July 12 and July 26. [Aug. 29]
NET Oct. 9/10Antares • OA-5
Launch time: 0247 GMT on 10th (10:47 p.m. EDT on 9th)
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
An Orbital ATK Antares rocket will launch of the seventh Cygnus cargo freighter on the sixth operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-5. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from May 31, June 24, July 6, Aug. 22 and September. [Sept. 21]
TBDAtlas 5 • SBIRS GEO Flight 3
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-066, will launch the U.S. military’s third Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite, or SBIRS GEO 3, for missile early-warning detection. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from May 26, July 27 and Oct. 3. [Sept. 13]
OctoberLong March 2F • Shenzhou 11
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2F rocket will launch the Shenzhou 11 spacecraft, a crewed mission to dock with the orbiting Tiangong 2 laboratory module. The flight is China’s sixth human space mission. Delayed from mid-2016. [March 3]
TBDSoyuz • ISS 48S
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Delayed from Sept. 22. [Sept. 18]
Oct. 20Soyuz • Progress 65P
Launch time: 0735 GMT (3:35 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 65th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. Delayed from April 22. [Aug. 17]
Oct. 31Rockot • Sentinel 5p
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Eurockot Rockot vehicle will launch with the Sentinel 5 Precursor Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 5p carries an instrument to measure air quality, ozone, pollution and aerosols in Earth’s atmosphere. [March 16]
Nov. 1H-2A • Himawari 9
Launch window: 0620-0918 GMT (2:20-5:18 a.m. EDT)
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2A rocket will launch the Himawari 9 weather satellite for the Japan Meteorological Agency. Himawari 9 will collect weather imagery over the East Asia and Western Pacific regions. Delayed from 3rd Quarter. [Sept. 5]
TBDFalcon 9 • Iridium Next 1-10
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from 1st Quarter. Moved up from August. Delayed from July, Sept. 12 and Sept. 19. [Sept. 13]
TBDFalcon 9 • SES 10
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SES 10 communications satellite. Owned by SES of Luxembourg, the spacecraft will provide direct-to-home TV broadcasting and other telecommunication services for Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America and South America. It will also cover Brazil and support offshore oil and gas exploration. Delayed from 3rd Quarter and October. [Sept. 13]
TBDFalcon 9 • Formosat 5 & Sherpa
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Formosat 5 for Taiwan’s National Space Organization (NSPO) and the Sherpa deployer from Spaceflight Industries carrying approximately 90 small payloads and CubeSats for a variety of scientific and commercial customers. Delayed from May, June, July, September and October. [Sept. 13]
Nov. 4Atlas 5 • GOES-R
Launch time: 2140-2340 GMT (5:40-7:40 p.m. EDT)
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-069, will launch GOES-R, the first next-generation geostationary weather satellite for NASA and NOAA. GOES-R will orbit 22,300 miles above the equator to monitor weather conditions across the United States. The rocket will fly in the 541 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, four solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from March 11. Moved forward from Oct. 14. Delayed from Oct. 13. [Aug. 11]
NovemberLong March 5 • Maiden Flight
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Wenchang, China
A Chinese Long March 5 rocket will launch on its inaugural flight from a new launch pad on Hainan Island. The heavy-lift rocket will be among the world’s most powerful boosters, and it will be used to launch components of China’s planned space station and interplanetary missions. [Sept. 13]
NovemberLong March 2D • HXMT
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket will launch the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope. The HXMT mission will conduct an all-sky survey with a suite of instruments designed to image the universe in the highest-energy X-rays, and study the formation and behavior of black holes and active galactic nuclei. [Sept. 16]
TBDFalcon 9 • EchoStar 23
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch EchoStar 23 communications satellite for EchoStar Corp. EchoStar 23, based on a spare platform from the canceled CMBStar 1 satellite program, will provide direct-to-home television broadcast services over Brazil. Delayed from 3rd quarter and 4th quarter. [Sept. 13]
TBDFalcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 10
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 12th Dragon spacecraft on the 10th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Feb. 13, June 10 and Aug. 1. Moved up from Nov. 21. Delayed from Nov. 11. [Sept. 13]
Nov. 15Soyuz • ISS 49S
Launch window: 2105 GMT (4:05 p.m. EST)
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. Moved forward from Nov. 16. [Sept. 16]
Nov. 17Ariane 5 • Galileo 15-18
Launch time: 1306:48 GMT (8:06:48 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ELA-3, Kourou, French Guiana
Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ES rocket, designed VA233, to launch four Galileo full operational capability satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation constellation. [Aug. 29]
TBDFalcon 9 • SES 11/EchoStar 105
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Cape Canaveral, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SES 11 communications satellite. Owned by SES of Luxembourg, the spacecraft will provide direct-to-home TV broadcasting services over North America, including Hawaii, Mexico and the Caribbean, for EchoStar Corp., which calls the satellite EchoStar 105. Delayed from October and November. [Sept. 13]
Nov. 21Pegasus XL • CYGNSS
Launch window: 1300-1430 GMT (8:00-9:30 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
L-1011, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
An air-launched Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket will deploy NASA’s Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission in orbit. The CYGNSS mission’s eight satellites will use GPS signals to study how tropical cyclones grow stronger over warm ocean waters. Delayed from Oct. 17. [July 11]
Nov. 23Proton • EchoStar 21
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
An International Launch Services Proton rocket with a Breeze M upper stage will deploy the EchoStar 21 communications satellite, formerly known as TerreStar 2. EchoStar 21 will provide mobile broadband services over Europe with an S-band payload for EchoStar Mobile Ltd. Delayed from June 25, Aug. 29 and Oct. 10. [Sept. 5]
Dec. 1Atlas 5 • NROL-79
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-3E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-068, will launch a classified spacecraft payload for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [Jan. 1]
Dec. 5Vega • Gokturk 1
Launch time: 1352:09 GMT (8:52:09 a.m. EST)
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
A European Vega rocket, designated VV08, will launch with the Gokturk 1 reconnaissance satellite for the Turkish military. [Sept. 18]
4th QuarterEpsilon • ERG
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Uchinoura Space Center, Japan
Japan’s Epsilon rocket will launch JAXA’s Exploration of Energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite to investigate the Van Allen radiation belts and study the origins of geomagnetic storms. This launch will be the second flight of Japan’s small Epsilon launch vehicle. [June 26]
Dec. 8Atlas 5 • EchoStar 19
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-071, will launch the EchoStar 19 communications satellite to provide high-speed Internet services for HughesNet in North America. The satellite is also known as Jupiter 2. The rocket will fly in the 431 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Nov. 10. [June 2]
TBDFalcon 9 • Koreasat 5A
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Koreasat 5A communications satellite for KTsat based in South Korea. Koreasat 5A will provide direct-to-home television broadcast and other communications services over Korea, Japan, the Philippines, Guam, Indochina, and South Asia. The satellite will also support maritime communications. [Aug. 17]
Dec. 15Delta 4 • WGS 8
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the eighth Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Sept. 22, Sept. 28, Oct. 20 and Nov. 17. [Sept. 21]
DecemberH-2B • HTV 6
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Tanegashima Space Center, Japan
A Japanese H-2B rocket will launch the sixth H-2 Transfer Vehicle. The HTV serves as an unmanned cargo vehicle to deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. Delayed from Sept. 30. [Sept. 5]
DecemberGSLV Mk.3 • GSAT 19
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota, India
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3 (GSLV Mk.3) will launch on its first orbital test flight with the GSAT 19E experimental communications satellite. [Sept. 16]
Dec. 19Long March 2D • TanSat
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Jiuquan, China
A Chinese Long March 2D rocket will launch the TanSat spacecraft to map the global distribution of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere and support efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. [Sept. 16]
Dec. 22Soyuz • Kanopus-V-IK
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch Kanopus-V-IK infrared Earth observation satellite for Roscosmos. Several other payloads, including Russia’s Zond solar research satellite and multiple small spacecraft from U.S. companies, will also be aboard the launch. The rocket will fly in the Soyuz-2.1a configuration with a Fregat upper stage. [Sept. 5]
Dec. 30Antares • OA-7
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Pad 0A, Wallops Island, Virginia
An Orbital ATK Antares rocket will launch of the eighth Cygnus cargo freighter on the seventh operational cargo delivery flight to the International Space Station. The mission is known as OA-7. The rocket will fly in the Antares 230 configuration, with two RD-181 first stage engines and a Castor 30XL second stage. Delayed from Oct. 4. [March 16]
TBDFalcon 9 • Iridium Next 11-20
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-4E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 10 satellites for the Iridium next mobile communications fleet. Delayed from October and December. [Sept. 13]
Early 2017Minotaur-C • SkySat
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-576E, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
An Orbital ATK Minotaur-C rocket will launch six SkySat Earth observation satellites for Google/Skybox Imaging. The Minotaur-C is an upgraded, renamed version of the Orbital Sciences Taurus rocket. Delayed from late 2015, mid-2016 and October 2016. [Aug. 29]
Jan. 26Atlas 5 • AEHF 4
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the fourth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 531 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Delayed from Dec. 15. [March 3]
1st QuarterFalcon Heavy • Demo Flight
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch on its first demonstration flight. The heavy-lift rocket is formed of three Falcon 9 rocket cores strapped together with 27 Merlin 1D engines firing at liftoff. Delayed from 3rd Quarter of 2015 and April, September and December 2016. [Sept. 13]
Feb. 1Soyuz • Progress 66P
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 66th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [March 28]
TBDFalcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 11
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 13th Dragon spacecraft on the 11th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from June 2, Aug. 15, Jan. 13 and Feb. 1. [Sept. 13]
MarchVega • Sentinel 3B
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV09, will launch with the Sentinel 3B Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 3B carries instruments to measure sea surface topography, sea and land surface temperature, and ocean and land color. [Sept. 16]
March 2Delta 4 • WGS 9
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the ninth Wideband Global SATCOM spacecraft, formerly known as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite. Built by Boeing, this geostationary communications spacecraft will serve U.S. military forces. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (5,4) configuration with four solid rocket boosters. Delayed from Feb. 2. [Sept. 5]
March 11Soyuz • ISS 50S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. [April 2]
March 16Delta 2 • JPSS 1
Launch time: 0947 GMT (5:47 a.m. EDT; 2:47 a.m. PDT)
Launch site:
SLC-2W, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
A United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket will launch the first spacecraft in the Joint Polar Satellite System, NOAA’s next-generation series of polar-orbiting weather observatories. The rocket will fly in the 7920 configuration with nine solid rocket boosters and no third stage. [Aug. 28]
MarchFalcon Heavy • STP-2
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s Space Test Program-2 mission with a cluster of military and scientific research satellites. The heavy-lift rocket is formed of three Falcon 9 rocket cores strapped together with 27 Merlin 1D engines firing at liftoff. Delayed from October 2016. [March 3]
AprilRockot • Sentinel 2B
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Russia
A Eurockot Rockot vehicle will launch with the Sentinel 2B Earth observation satellite for the European Space Agency and the European Commission. Sentinel 2B carries an optical imaging payload for land observation. [March 30]
May 3Delta 4 • GPS 3-1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s first third-generation navigation satellite for the Global Positioning System. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (4,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. [June 1]
May 29Soyuz • ISS 51S
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the crewed Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station with members of the next Expedition crew. The capsule will remain at the station for about six months, providing an escape pod for the residents. [July 27]
June 1Falcon 9 • SpaceX CRS 12
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the 14th Dragon spacecraft on the 12th operational cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. The flight is being conducted under the Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA. Delayed from Dec. 15, 1st Quarter and April 8. [July 27]
June 15Soyuz • Progress 67P
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan
A Russian government Soyuz rocket will launch the 67th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station. [July 27]
June 15Pegasus XL • ICON
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
L-1011, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands
An air-launched Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket will deploy NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite into orbit. ICON will study the ionosphere, a region of Earth’s upper atmosphere where terrestrial weather meets space weather. Disturbances in the ionosphere triggered by solar storms or weather activity in the lower atmosphere can cause disturbances in GPS navigation and radio transmissions. [Aug. 17]
JulyFalcon 9 • Crew Dragon Demo 1
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on an uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station under the auspices of NASA’s commercial crew program. Delayed from December 2016 and May 2017. [Sept. 13]
Aug. 4Atlas 5 • TDRS M
Launch window: TBD
Launch site:
SLC-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the TDRS M communications and data relay satellite for NASA. The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) connects mission control with the International Space Station and other orbiting satellites. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. [Sept. 16]
AugustVega • Optsat 3000 & Venus
Launch time: TBD
Launch site:
ZLV, Kourou, French Guiana
An Arianespace Vega rocket, designated VV10, will launch with the Optsat 3000 high-resolution reconnaissance satellite for the Italian military and the French-Israeli Venus environmental satellite to monitor the health of vegetation and test an experimental plasma thruster system in orbit. [Sept. 16]