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The Mission




Orbiter: Endeavour
Mission: STS-123
Launch: March 11, 2008
Time: 2:28 a.m. EDT (0628 GMT)
Site: Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Landing: March 26 @ 8:39 p.m. EDT
Site: Shuttle Landing Facility, KSC

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Video archive

Day 14 highlights

Easter Sunday in space on Flight Day 14 included a few hours of rest and the joint crew news conference.

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Day 13 highlights

On Flight Day 13, the mission's final spacewalk attached the shuttle's heat shield inspection boom to the station.

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Day 12 highlights

Inspections of Endeavour's wings and nose for space debris hits were conducted on Flight Day 12.

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Day 11 highlights

Spacewalkers on Flight Day 11 tested a method for repairing damaged shuttle heat shield tiles in space.

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Day 10 highlights

Video highlights from Flight Day 10 as the astronauts enjoyed a mid-mission light-duty day.

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STS-123 day 9 highlights

Flight Day 9 saw Dextre moved to the Destiny lab, stowing the assembly pallet and a group dinner in the Zvezda module.

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STS-123 day 8 highlights

Finishing assembly of Dextre and delivering spare parts to the station occurred during the spacewalk on Flight Day 8.

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STS-123 day 7 highlights

The space station's handyman robot Dextre flexed its arms for the first time during Flight Day 7.

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STS-123 day 6 highlights

Flight Day 6 was dedicated to the second spacewalk and continued assembly of the Dextre robot.

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STS-123 day 5 highlights

The station and shuttle crews opened up and entered Japan's new Kibo logistics module during Flight Day 5.

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STS-123 day 4 highlights

Highlights of the Kibo logistics module's attachment to the station and the first spacewalk to begin Dextre assembly.

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STS-123 day 3 highlights

This movie shows the highlights from Flight Day 3 as Endeavour docked to the space station.

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STS-123 day 2 highlights

Flight Day 2 of Endeavour's mission focused on heat shield inspections. This movie shows the day's highlights.

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STS-123 day 1 highlights

The highlights from shuttle Endeavour's launch day are packaged into this movie.

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Launching on the shuttle

Video cameras on the boosters and tank, plus a cockpit camera show what the shuttle and its astronauts experience during the trek to space.

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STS-120: In review

The STS-120 crew narrates highlights from its mission that delivered the station's Harmony module and moved the P6 power truss.

 Full presentation
 Mission film

STS-123: TCDT

The STS-123 astronauts complete their countdown dress rehearsal at Kennedy Space Center.

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STS-123: To the pad

Endeavour travels to pad 39A in the overnight hours of Feb. 18 in preparation for liftoff on STS-123.

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Introduction to ATV

Preview the maiden voyage of European's first Automated Transfer Vehicle, named Jules Verne. The craft will deliver cargo to the International Space Station.

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More video



Station chief gives detailed update on joint problem
BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: March 25, 2008

Analysis of metallic contamination from a critical solar array rotary joint on the international space station indicates a "high-friction event" of some sort, possibly a misaligned bearing roller or some other like defect, has chewed up and damaged one of the surfaces of a 10-foot-wide gear and bearing race, the station's program manager said Monday.

A definitive answer to what caused extensive damage to the race ring is not yet complete and as a result, NASA managers have not yet decided what sort of repairs might be needed to restore the joint to normal operation. But Program Manager Mike Suffredini said an analysis shows the station's solar arrays can generate enough power for near-normal station operations through the rest of this year and early next with the right side solar alpha rotary joint, or SARJ, locked in place or only occasionally moved to improve power generation.

"We may have to manage how we do research, but we should be able to do the research that we planned," he said.

But this is a critical issue for the long-term health of the space station and Suffredini provided the most detailed update yet on where the ongoing troubleshooting stands.

The space station is equipped with two SARJ joints, one on each side of its main power truss. Each SARJ features two 10-foot-wide drive gears, one of which is a backup. The main gear/race ring is gripped by 12 so-called trundle bearing assemblies spaced evenly around the circumference. The trundle bearings each feature three rollers that grip different faces of the drive gear/race ring. The gear is driven by a motor called a drive lock assembly, or DLA. Each joint features two DLAs, but only one is used at a time.

The SARJ system is critical to the station's long-term viability. To provide the power necessary to run all the station's planned science operations, along with life support systems, computers, communications gear, cooling systems, etc., the solar arrays must track the sun as the station circles the planet.

The station's left-side SARJ is operating normally. But last fall, engineers noticed higher-than-expected vibration levels in the right-side SARJ and drive motor power spikes indicative of mechanical resistance of some sort.

During a subsequent spacewalk inspection, extensive internal metallic contamination was discovered in the form of apparent shavings found clumped and scattered across one face of the race ring. The surface of the ring itself appeared mottled and damaged. To minimize additional damage, flight controllers decided to suspend "auto-track" drive operations, although the starboard SARJ is occasionally repositioned to improve power generation.

During previous spacewalks, astronauts removed 17 of 22 thermal covers around the circumference of the joint to look for signs of micrometeoroid impact damage or any other issues that might explain the problem. In addition, one of the 12 trundle bearing assemblies positioned around the race ring - TBA No. 5 - was removed and returned to Earth for analysis, along with samples of the metallic debris.

During the Endeavour crew's fifth and final spacewalk Saturday, astronaut Mike Foreman removed the final five thermal covers and looked inside the joint. There were no signs of any impact damage. He also examined a small spot on the undamaged "datum A" race ring that was seen in earlier photographs. Engineers were not sure whether the blemish was a pit or a bump-like defect caused by a buildup of contaminants. Foreman said it felt rough to him, indicating it might be a depression, but with thick gloves on, the astronaut could not be definitive.

NASA managers initially held out hope spacewalking astronauts could somehow clean up the contamination and restore the joint to normal, or near-normal, operation. That no longer appears possible and NASA is expected to order a switch to the redundant drive gear at some point. But that's a last-resot sort of option. Engineers want to make sure they understand the cause of the problem first, to make sure the same thing won't happen on the backup gear.

"SARJ is going to take us a while to figure out," Suffredini said. "But we did bring home quite a bit of information on the last flight and we did learn a few things that we're still working on. The data does suggest, from the way that the material has come off of the race, that it was caused by a high-friction event. We have been postulating for a while that perhaps contamination had gotten on the race and when we rolled over it, we created a weak spot in this brittle surface that we talked about, perhaps it was damaged that way, kind of like the pothole in the road theory, and chewed it up. The problem with that theory was we chewed it up awfully quick if it started off as one small spot.

"So based on the way the material has come off and where the fracture lines are - and it is incredible to watch these guys do this work to try to do detailed analysis of these very small particles we brought home - but they've been able to conclude that ... some of these larger flakes that we brought home were the result of high-friction events. And what that tells you is that perhaps we had either a roller that was cocked or one that wasn't quite rolling as freely as we thought. There are a number of scenarios that lead you down that path. So that is a piece of information we gleaned from that.

"One of the interesting things from the last EVA, we sent the crew to go look at what we had assumed was contamination, maybe I should say we wished was contamination. The crew seems to have indicated that the spot that they saw was rough. Now that may be contamination that got pressed on to the race as we rolled over it. That is a more likely candidate, but we couldn't tell. Was it rough because it's high? Was it rough because it's low? So we'll have to think about that.

"Damage to datum A would be an interesting piece of information," Suffredini said. "To date, we've seen the damage only on the upper inclined surface. And so if you postulated that we had a roller or something that was canted wrong for whatever reason, not aligned quite right, then that would explain why only that surface was damaged. If over a much longer period of time we were starting to see the same thing on datum A, of course, that makes our theory a little more difficult. But there are still 111 branches on our fault tree and 300-plus actions left to be closed. And so our job is to give the team as much time as possible to try to sort this out."

A major question mark throughout the troubleshooting is how long station assembly and operation can go without having full auto-track solar power available. Suffredini said the latest analysis shows NASA can go ahead and attach Japan's huge Kibo research module in May as planned and even bolt on the S6 solar array segment to complete the right side of the station's power truss. That flight, known as assembly mission 15A, currently is scheduled for launch in December, although external tank delivery issues could force a delay.

In any case, the station should have enough power without any SARJ repairs until the next flight in the sequence, launch of a third Japanese component next spring.

"We have, for all intents and purposes, cleared ourselves through the 15A stage, which means we can install the S6 truss on the 15A flight and make our way all the way to the end of that stage," Suffredini said. "As you may know, the flight after that is the exposed facility for JAXA, which requires not an insignificant amount of power. So that's probably the next bump we have to get through on the road.

"In order to get through that hump and keep runway in front of us before we actually have to do something like swap races, one option is we're looking at whether we can do the analysis that lets us temporarily rotate that joint during low-power periods," he said. "Today, we try to hold it locked. And so, if we can get about 60 days worth of rotations out of that joint, then perhaps we can buy ourselves a little more time to finish our failure analysis and decide what changes we might need to make. If it's just a matter of swapping over (to the outboard, redundant race ring), I can do that almost any time. But we might decide there are some hardware changes we want to implement, which would take us a little more time.

"Today I don't know the answer to what causes this problem, we have a number of legs left to work down the fault tree where every day we get a new piece of data. We pulled all the rest of the covers off (during Forman's spacewalk Saturday) and we didn't find an MMOD (micrometeoroid debris) strike that started this whole thing. So that was important information for us. And so if we can give the team enough time, I'm convinced we can figure out how to prevent this once we go to outboard ops. So our job is to work the failure analysis as hard as we can and give the team as much time to do that before we have to swap to outboard ops. That's kind of where we're at."

Asked if the station could operate normally in the near term without an operational right-side SARJ, Suffredini said: "We may have to manage how we do research, but we should be able to do the research that we planned.

"We won't be able to line everybody up and run them at the same time, but typically crew time doesn't allow us to do that anyway," he said. "So I would not see any major implications to research during that particular stage. Somewhere in there, we'll also finish our analysis on whether we can rotate the SARJ for a certain period of time and so we'll have that in our hip pocket as well."

NASA has one spare set of trundle bearings. Suffredini was asked if NASA might consider simply installing the new bearings on the damaged race ring, preserving the option of switching to the outboard ring later if necessary.

"The race is damaged to a significant level such that my personal opinion is it would be difficult to get the structural life that we would need out of the outboard truss if we kept running along that damaged race," he said. "That is something we've looked at and thought a lot about. Of course, when we go to outboard ops we'll replace all of those bearings. So if we can figure out that that's the cause, then we have a dozen of those bearings sitting on the ground and we can certainly check them for whatever we believe the root cause is."

One option, perhaps, would be to "go ahead and do the reconfiguration to outboard ops but not rotate, get the rest of those trundle bearings home and see if we can find a smoking gun."

"But that's just one of many things that we've talked about doing," Suffredini said. "But I don't think I have an option, if I have to continually rotate the SARJ, I really don't think structural life is going to allow me to rotate on that bad race. Other than structural life, though, I think the system can drive through and our speculation is it will get easier over time as we knock the high points off that rough surface. I think the system can drive through it even with the existing bearings we have, but it'll just chew up the structural life of those quickly."

Asked if NASA had ruled out moving the bearings to the outboard race this year, Suffredini said "I learned a long time ago not to make those kind of predictions. You guys trained me that way."

Spaceflight Now Plus
Additional coverage for subscribers:
VIDEO: STATION'S VIEW OF SHUTTLE WATER DUMP PLAY
VIDEO: UNDOCKING REPLAY FROM STATION CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: UNDOCKING REPLAY FROM SHUTTLE CAMERAS PLAY
VIDEO: MONDAY NIGHT'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ENDEAVOUR UNDOCKS FROM THE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: SOLAR ARRAY LATCHING PROBLEM DELAYS UNDOCKING PLAY
VIDEO: HATCH CLOSED BETWEEN DOCKING PORT AND HARMONY PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE AND STATION CREWS SAY THEIR FAREWELLS PLAY
VIDEO: MONDAY'S MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM UPDATE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF UNDOCKING AND FLYAROUND PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 14 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: ARIZONA AND COLORADO SEEN FROM SPACE AT NIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: NEW YORK CITY AND BOSTON SEEN FROM SPACE AT NIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: BEAUTIFUL MOONSET SEEN FROM THE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: SUNDAY NIGHT'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: JOINT SHUTTLE AND STATION CREW NEWS CONFERENCE PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 13 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: SUNDAY MORNING'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: CONCLUSION OF MISSION'S FINAL SPACEWALK PLAY
VIDEO: HELMET-CAM SURVEY OF DEPLOYED EXPERIMENTS PLAY
VIDEO: SECOND EXPERIMENT PACKAGE RETRIEVED FROM SHUTTLE PLAY
VIDEO: MATERIALS EXPOSURE EXPERIMENT INSTALLED ON ISS PLAY
VIDEO: FURTHER EXAMINATION OF STATION'S ROTARY JOINT PLAY
VIDEO: PROTECTIVE COVER PLACED OVER BOOM SENSOR PACKAGE PLAY
VIDEO: HEAT SHIELD INSPECTION BOOM MOUNTED ON THE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: BOOM MOVED FOR SPACEWALKERS TO MANUALLY STOW PLAY
VIDEO: GOOD CONNECTION CONFIRMED FOR BOOM UMBILICAL PLAY
VIDEO: CRITICAL UMBILICAL FOR BOOM INSTALLED ON STATION PLAY
VIDEO: INSPECTION BOOM HANDED OFF BETWEEN ROBOT ARM PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS EXIT AIRLOCK TO BEGIN EVA NO. 5 PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF BOOM ATTACHMENT TO ISS PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 5 PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 12 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: FRIDAY NIGHT'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SCIENCE GLOVEBOX FACILITY MOVED INTO COLUMBUS LAB PLAY
VIDEO: INSPECTION BOOM SURVEYS SHUTTLE WINGS AND NOSE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF LATE INSPECTION PROCESS PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 11 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: FRIDAY MORNING'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: BEHNKEN GIVES ANOTHER SHOT AT STUCK CONNECTOR PLAY
VIDEO: TILE SAMPLES AND DISPENSER STOWED IN PAYLOAD BAY PLAY
VIDEO: CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE 'REPAIRED' SHUTTLE TILES PLAY
VIDEO: SPACE SHUTTLE TILE REPAIR DEMONSTRATION - PART 2 PLAY
VIDEO: SPACE SHUTTLE TILE REPAIR DEMONSTRATION - PART 1 PLAY
VIDEO: TILE REPAIR DRY RUN PRACTICE WITH THE DISPENSER PLAY
VIDEO: SPACEWALKERS SET UP WORKSITE FOR TILE REPAIR TEST PLAY
VIDEO: FOREMAN FIGHTS WITH STUCK POWER CONNECTOR PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS EGRESS AIRLOCK FOR EVA NO. 4 PLAY
VIDEO: TILE REPAIR DEMONSTRATION PREVIEW PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 4 PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF FUTURE DEXTRE WORK PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF JAPAN'S SECTION OF ISS PLAY

VIDEO: LAUNCH VIDEO FROM COCKPIT CAMERA W/INTERCOM PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 10 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: WEDNESDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: CREW MEDIA INTERVIEWS WEDNESDAY NIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: JAPANESE VIP CALL TO STATION PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 9 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: TUESDAY NIGHT'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH CARRIER PALLET RETURNED TO SHUTTLE PLAY
VIDEO: DEXTRE ROBOT ATTACHED TO DESTINY LAB MODULE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF DEXTRE'S RELOCATION PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 8 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: TUESDAY MORNING'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: DEXTRE ROBOT FREED FROM LAUNCH PALLET PLAY
VIDEO: SECOND SPARE DCSU BOX PLACED ON THE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: SPACEWALKER UNABLE TO INSTALL MISSE EXPERIMENT PLAY
VIDEO: FIRST SPARE DCSU BOX PLACED ON THE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: SPARE YAW JOINT FOR STATION ARM TRANSFERRED PLAY
VIDEO: MOUNTING PLATE ATTACHED TO COLUMBUS PLAY
VIDEO: DEXTRE ROBOT FITTED WITH TOOL HOLDER PLAY
VIDEO: TOOL PLATFORM ATTACHED TO DEXTRE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 3 PLAY

VIDEO: LEFT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING UPWARD PLAY
VIDEO: LEFT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING INBOARD PLAY
VIDEO: LEFT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING DOWNWARD PLAY
VIDEO: RIGHT-HAND BOOSTER CAMERA LOOKING UPWARD PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 7 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: DEXTRE MOVES ARMS FOR BRAKE TESTS PLAY
VIDEO: CREW MEDIA INTERVIEWS SUNDAY NIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: SUNDAY NIGHT'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 6 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: SUNDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SECOND ARM ATTACHED TO DEXTRE ROBOT PLAY
VIDEO: FIRST ARM ATTACHED TO THE DEXTRE ROBOT PLAY
VIDEO: SPACEWALKERS HELP DEXTRE DO A SIT-UP PLAY
VIDEO: SECOND DEXTRE ARM PULLED FROM LAUNCH CARRIER PLAY
VIDEO: FIRST ARM REMOVED FROM PALLET WITH FORCE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 2 PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 5 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: SATURDAY MORNING MEDIA INTERVIEWS PLAY
VIDEO: STATION ARM GRAPPLES DEXTRE TO PROVIDE POWER PLAY
VIDEO: CEREMONY AT JAPANESE MODULE HATCH OPENING PLAY
VIDEO: SATURDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: FRIDAY'S MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM UPDATE PLAY

VIDEO: THURSDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: NEW MODULE CONNECTED TO THE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: JAPANESE MODULE UNBERTHED FROM SHUTTLE PLAY
VIDEO: SPACEWALKER START ASSEMBLING DEXTRE ROBOT PLAY
VIDEO: JAPANESE MODULE PREPPED FOR UNBERTHING PLAY
VIDEO: HARMONY DOCKING PORT PREPPED PLAY
VIDEO: SPACEWALK NO. 1 BEGINS PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION PREVIEWING JAPANESE JLP MODULE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION PREVIEWING MODULE MOVE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF SPACEWALK NO. 1 PLAY
VIDEO: THURSDAY'S MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM UPDATE PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: DEXTRE PALLET MOVED FROM SHUTTLE TO STATION PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION PREVIEWING DEXTRE ROBOT PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION PREVIEWING PALLET MOVE PLAY
VIDEO: THURSDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD STATION PLAY
VIDEO: DOCKING REPLAY FROM OTHER TRUSS CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ENDEAVOUR DOCKS TO SPACE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: ENDEAVOUR PERFORMS THE 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP PLAY
VIDEO: VIEWS OF THE SHUTTLE APPROACHING FROM BELOW PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED ANIMATION OF PREVIEWING THE DOCKING PLAY
VIDEO: UPDATE FROM MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: WEDNESDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: ANIMATION OF THE HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED TOUR OF ENDEAVOUR'S PAYLOAD BAY PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: THE FULL LAUNCH EXPERIENCE PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ENDEAVOUR BLASTS OFF! PLAY
VIDEO: THE POST-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE PLAY
VIDEO: HIGHLIGHTS FROM ENDEAVOUR'S LAUNCH CAMPAIGN PLAY
VIDEO: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PAYLOADS' LAUNCH CAMPAIGN PLAY

VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: VAB ROOF PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD FRONT PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: PRESS SITE PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 WIDESCREEN PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 061 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 063 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 PLAY

VIDEO: FINAL PRE-LAUNCH POLLS GIVE "GO" FOR LIFTOFF PLAY
VIDEO: ENDEAVOUR'S CREW MODULE CLOSED FOR FLIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUT DOI CLIMBS INTO HIS SEAT PLAY
VIDEO: PILOT JOHNSON CLIMBS INTO HIS SEAT PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUT REISMAN CLIMBS INTO HIS SEAT PLAY
VIDEO: COMMANDER GORIE CLIMBS INTO HIS SEAT PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE AT LAUNCH PAD 39A PLAY
VIDEO: CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS DON SPACESUITS FOR LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: TIME-LAPSE MOVIE OF SUNSET OVER PAD 39A PLAY
VIDEO: MORNING PREPARATIONS AT LAUNCH PAD 39A PLAY
VIDEO: PAD GANTRY RETRACTED FOR LAUNCH PLAY

VIDEO: OVERVIEW BRIEFING ON CANADA'S DEXTRE ROBOT PLAY
VIDEO: OVERVIEW BRIEFING ON JAPAN'S KIBO FACILITIES PLAY
VIDEO: SUNDAY'S COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SATURDAY'S COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: CREW ARRIVES AT KENNEDY SPACE CENTER FOR LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: FRIDAY'S COUNTDOWN STATUS AND WEATHER BRIEFING PLAY

VIDEO: STS-123 ASTRONAUT BIOGRAPHY MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED SHORT FILM PREVIEW ENDEAVOUR'S FLIGHT PLAY

VIDEO: STS-123 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: BRIEFING ON THE SPACEWALKS PLAY
VIDEO: CREW'S PRE-FLIGHT BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE AND ISS PROGRAM UPDATE PLAY

VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW: COMMANDER DOM GORIE PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW: PILOT GREG JOHNSON PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW: MS1 BOB BEHNKEN PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW: MS2 MIKE FOREMAN PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW: MS3 TAKAO DOI PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW: MS4 RICK LINNEHAN PLAY

VIDEO: FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW NEWS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: TCDT TRAINING HIGHLIGHTS PLAY
VIDEO: PRESS CHAT WITH CREW AT LAUNCH PAD PLAY
VIDEO: CREW ARRIVES AT KSC FOR PRACTICE COUNT PLAY
VIDEO: ENDEAVOUR ARRIVES AT PAD 39A PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ROLLS TO THE VAB PLAY | XL SIZE
MORE: STS-123 VIDEO COVERAGE
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