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The Mission




Orbiter: Atlantis
Mission: STS-122
Payload: Columbus science laboratory
Launch: Feb. 7, 2008
Time: 2:45 p.m. EST
Site: Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Landing: Feb. 20 @ 9:07 a.m. EST
Site: Shuttle Landing Facility, KSC


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Video archive

STS-122: The mission

Atlantis' trip to the station will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus science lab module.

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STS-122: The programs

Managers from the shuttle, station and EVA programs discuss Atlantis' upcoming flight.

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STS-122: Spacewalks

Three spacewalks are planned during Atlantis' STS-122 assembly mission. Lead spacewalk officer Anna Jarvis previews the EVAs.

 Full briefing
 EVA 1 summary
 EVA 2 summary
 EVA 3 summary

The Atlantis crew

The astronauts of Atlantis' STS-122 mission meet the press in the traditional pre-flight news conference.

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Harmony's big move

The station's new Harmony module is detached from the Unity hub and moved to its permanent location on the Destiny lab.

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Delta 4-Heavy launch

The first operational Delta 4-Heavy rocket launches the final Defense Support Program missile warning satellite for the Air Force.

 Full coverage

Columbus readied

The European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory module moves to pad 39A and placed aboard shuttle Atlantis for launch.

 To pad | Installed

Station port moved

The station crew uses the robot arm to detach the main shuttle docking port and mount it to the new Harmony module Nov. 12.

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Atlantis rolls out

Space shuttle Atlantis rolls from the Vehicle Assembly Building to pad 39A for its December launch with the Columbus module.

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Atlantis goes vertical

Atlantis is hoisted upright and maneuvered into position for attachment to the external tank and boosters.

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Space station EVA

This Expedition 16 status briefing recaps the Nov. 9 spacewalk that prepared the station's shuttle docking port for relocation to the new Harmony module.

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More video



Schlegel could take Wednesday's spacewalk
BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: February 10, 2008

NASA managers expect German astronaut Hans Schlegel to participate in a spacewalk Wednesday, the second of three excursions planned by the shuttle Atlantis' crew. Schlegel, a 56-year-old father of seven, originally planned to join astronaut Rex Walheim for the crew's first spacewalk today. But the EVA was delayed 24 hours to Monday - and Schlegel was replaced by Stan Love - when the European Space Agency astronaut apparently became ill after launch last week.

NASA managers have refused to provide any details about the nature of the illness or even confirm who on the shuttle/station complex was sick. They would only say the illness was not life threatening and that no mission objectives were threatened by the spacewalk delay and crew shuffle. Today they would not directly say whether flight surgeons had cleared Schlegel for the second spacewalk.

But lead Flight Director Mike Sarafin said "the plan right now is to perform the rest of the mission as planned." That means he expects Schlegel to be available for the second spacewalk Wednesday.

Asked if the medical issue, whatever it was, had been resolved, Mission Management Team Chairman John Shannon would only say: "The flight surgeons, as they always do, they stay in contact with each of the crew members and they discuss their status and then they feed it back to us and it's an ongoing process. Right now, like MIke said, the plan is as the plan was pre-flight and that's the way we're going to go execute it. If they come back to us and say that's changed, then we'll react to that change."

Reporter: "So for the time being, the medical issue is resolved?"

Shannon: "There are no changes to the plan as it's currently laid out."

Schlegel looked relatively fit in television shots downlinked from space today as the astronauts worked through a hastily revised timeline, reviewing plans for Monday's spacewalk, transferring equipment to and from the space station and carrying out a detailed robotic inspection of a slightly pulled-up insulation blanket on the ship's right rear rocket pod.

The so-called focussed inspection was ordered after image analysts noticed a corner of the blanket had pulled up during Atlantis' climb to space Thursday. In close-up television views today, it appeared the stitching along the seam between two adjacent blankets had come apart, allowing a small, triangular section of one blanket corner to pull up slightly. The damage did not appear serious to the untrained eye, but Shannon said engineers have not yet reached a conclusion on whether anything needs to be done.

Overall, he said, Atlantis is in good condition with no signs of problems with the ship's critical underside heat shield, nose cap or wing leading edge panels, which experience the most extreme heating during re-entry.

"The thermal protection system inspections that we do are going extremely well," Shannon said. "It's the fastest I've ever seen them done on a flight. We have completely cleared the bottom of the orbiter, there are no issues we are working on the bottom, all of the reinforced carbon carbon on the wings and the nose are completely cleared. We're gathering additional information on the right OMS pod. There's really no change from (Saturday).

"There's also a couple of small tile chips around the crew windows on the front of the vehicle. Nobody expects them to be any issues at all, we just have not gotten to the point of analyzing them yet. I would expect by Tuesday we'll have all that work done and be able to completely clear the orbiter."

The astronauts were asked to change out a computer hard drive today in order to downlink photographs shot by a camera in the belly of the orbiter showing the ship's external tank after initial separation in orbit. Those pictures will be added to other views to help engineers assess the performance of the tank's foam insulation as NASA gears up to launch shuttle Endeavour on the next station assembly mission around March 11.

Shannon said both of Atlantis' spent booster rockets had been recovered and towed back to port. The right side rocket was at the booster processing facility Sunday and video shot during ascent, possibly showing when the rocket pod blanket peeled back, should be ready for review by early Monday. The ship towing the left-side booster has been held up by windy weather and its video is expected later in the week.

"Since the right OMS pod is where the blanket lifted up and we'd like to see when that happened, we were a little bit lucky and got the correct booster in first before the winds kicked up," Shannon said.

Otherwise, he concluded, "we're really looking forward to watching the crew and the ground ops team place Columbus in its final home and we're very excited about that tomorrow."

Walheim and Love plan to begin the mission's first spacewalk at 9:35 a.m. Monday. Their primary objective is to mount a robot arm attachment fitting on the European Columbus research module so Leland Melvin, operating the space station's robot arm, can pull it out of Atlantis' cargo bay. Walheim and Love will then make preparations for replacing a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

Melvin, meanwhile, will move Columbus into position for attachment to the right side hatch of the forward Harmony module so motorized bolts can engage to lock it in place. The astronauts plan to enter the module for the first time Tuesday. If all goes well, Walheim and Schlegel will stage a second spacewalk Wednesday with Walheim and Love carrying out a third and final excursion Friday.

Here is a timeline of major events Monday (in EST and mission elapsed time; includes revision C of the NASA TV schedule):


EST........DD...HH...MM...EVENT

02/11/08
04:45 AM...03...14...00...STS/ISS crew wakeup
05:20 AM...03...14...35...EVA-1: 14.7 psi airlock repress/hygiene break
06:15 AM...03...15...30...Flight director update on NASA TV
06:30 AM...03...15...45...EVA-1: Resume airlock preps
06:35 AM...03...15...50...ISS daily planning conference
08:00 AM...03...17...15...EVA-1: Spacesuit purge
08:15 AM...03...17...30...EVA-1: Spacesuit prebreathe
09:05 AM...03...18...20...EVA-1: Airlock depressurization
09:15 AM...03...18...30...Shuttle KU-band antenna stowed for Columbus unberthing
09:35 AM...03...18...50...EVA-1: Spacesuits to battery power
09:40 AM...03...18...55...EVA-1: Airlock egress
09:55 AM...03...19...10...EVA-1: Power-data grapple fixture (PDGF) setup
11:35 AM...03...20...50...EVA-1: PDGF installation on Columbus module
01:50 PM...03...23...05...Station arm (SSRMS) grapples Columbus module
01:50 PM...03...23...05...Harmony prepared for Columbus attachment
02:05 PM...03...23...20...EVA-1: Walheim: nitrogen tank removal preps
02:10 PM...03...23...25...SSRMS unberths Columbus module
02:15 PM...03...23...30...EVA-1: Love: Nitrogen tank removal preps
03:35 PM...04...00...50...EVA-1: Payload bay cleanup and airlock ingress
04:05 PM...04...01...20...Columbus first stage bolting
04:05 PM...04...01...20...EVA-1: Airlock repressurization (spacewalk ends)
04:15 PM...04...01...30...Spacesuit servicing
04:25 PM...04...01...40...Columbus second stage bolting
04:40 PM...04...01...55...Columbus attachment to Harmony complete
05:00 PM...04...02...15...Centerline berthing camera removal
06:00 PM...04...03...15...Mission status/MMT briefing on NASA TV
08:15 PM...04...05...30...ISS crew sleep begins
08:45 PM...04...06...00...STS/ISS crew sleep begins
09:00 PM...04...06...15...Daily video highlights reel on NASA TV

Atlantis' mission was extended one day when NASA managers decided to delay the first spacewalk to Monday. NASA managers are considering the possibility of adding one more extension day after the spacewalks are complete to give the crew more time to outfit and activate Columbus or deal with any other unfinished tasks. A decision on the second extension day is expected later this week.

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Additional coverage for subscribers:
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: POST-MISSION MANAGEMENT TEAM BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SATURDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ATLANTIS DOCKS TO SPACE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS PERFORMS THE 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP PLAY
VIDEO: VIEWS OF THE SHUTTLE APPROACHING FROM BELOW PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS COMPLETES THE "TI" BURN PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF THE DOCKING PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: FRIDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED PLAY

VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: FRONT CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 PLAY

VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: NARRATED REVIEW OF ATLANTIS' LAUNCH PREPS PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: NASA AND ESA POST-LAUNCH NEWS BRIEFING PLAY

VIDEO: FULL LENGTH LAUNCH MOVIE! PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS BLASTS OFF WITH COLUMBUS PLAY
VIDEO: POLLS GIVE THE FINAL "GO" TO LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE AT LAUNCH PAD 39A PLAY
VIDEO: CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS DON THEIR SPACESUITS FOR LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: RUSSIAN CARGO SHIP DOCKS TO STATION THIS MORNING PLAY
VIDEO: PAD GANTRY ROLLED BACK THE NIGHT BEFORE LAUNCH PLAY

VIDEO: COLUMBUS AND ATV OVERVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE PLAY
VIDEO: TUESDAY MORNING'S COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: MONDAY'S CARGO SHIP UNDOCKING FROM STATION PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS' PAYLOAD BAY DOORS CLOSED FOR FLIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: CREW RETURNS TO KENNEDY SPACE CENTER FOR LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: MONDAY MORNING'S COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: POST-FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: STS-122 ASTRONAUT BIOGRAPHIES PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED OVERVIEW OF ATLANTIS' MISSION PLAY
VIDEO: INSIGHTS INTO COLUMBUS SCIENCE LABORATORY PLAY
VIDEO: STS-122 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: BRIEFING ON THE SPACEWALKS PLAY
VIDEO: CREW'S PRE-FLIGHT BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH STEVE FRICK PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH ALAN POINDEXTER PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH LELAND MELVIN PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH REX WALHEIM PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH HANS SCHLEGEL PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH STANLEY LOVE PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH LEOPOLD EYHARTS PLAY
MORE: STS-122 VIDEO COVERAGE
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