Spaceflight Now



The Mission




Orbiter: Atlantis
Mission: STS-117
Launch: June 8, 2007
Time: 7:38 p.m. EDT
Site: Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Landing: June 22 @ 3:49 p.m. EDT
Site: Edwards Air Force Base, California

Mission Status Center

Ascent Timeline

NASA TV Schedule

Countdown Timeline

Master Flight Plan

STS-117 Quick-Look

Launch Windows Chart

Meet the Astronauts

Key Mission Personnel

Shuttle Launch Schedule

STS-117 Archive

STS-116 Archive

STS-115 Archive

STS-121 Archive

STS-114 Archive



Spaceflight Now +



Subscribe to Spaceflight Now Plus for access to our extensive video collections!
How do I sign up?
Video archive

Atlantis launch coverage

Shuttle Atlantis blasted off Friday evening on its mission to the space station.

 Full Coverage

Atlantis date set

NASA leaders hold this news briefing to announce shuttle Atlantis' launch date and recap the Flight Readiness Review.

 Play

Phoenix: At the Cape

NASA's Mars lander named Phoenix has arrive at Kennedy Space Center to begin preparations for launch in August.

 Full coverage

STS-63: A rendezvous with space station Mir

As a prelude to future dockings between American space shuttles and the Russian space station Mir, the two countries had a test rendezvous in Feb. 1995.

 Play

"Apollo 17: On The Shoulders of Giants"

Apollo's final lunar voyage is relived in this movie. The film depicts the highlights of Apollo 17's journey to Taurus-Littrow and looks to the future Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz and shuttle programs.

 Play

Atlantis returns to pad

Two months after rolling off the launch pad to seek repairs to the hail-damaged external fuel tank, space shuttle Atlantis returns to pad 39A for mission STS-117.

 Part 1 | Part 2

Become a subscriber
More video



Station computers brought to life after impromptu repair
BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: June 15, 2007

In a possible breakthrough, space station commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and flight engineer Oleg Kotov used a jumper cable to bypass a suspect secondary power supply switch today and successfully activated four of six navigation and command computers that appeared to malfunction earlier this week, NASA officials said.

Details were not immediately clear, but two channels, or "lanes," in the Russian central command-and-control computer appeared to operate normally after the improvised power supply repair, along with two of three lanes making up the station's guidance and navigation computer, known collectively as the terminal computer.

"Fyodor, go ahead and activate the central computer power... one, two, three," ground control called. A few moments later, after reviewing diagnostic data, a controller (speaking through an interpreter) radioed: "Well, good news, it's good news that it's working."

Each system includes three redundant computers that work in concert to avoid faulty data or incorrect results. The terminal computer system operates the station's Russian rocket thrusters to re-orient the lab complex as required to keep sunlight on solar arrays and to keep sensitive systems from getting too hot or too cold.

The central computer is used to control the Russian segment's Elektron oxygen generator, its Vozdukh carbon dioxide removal system and a variety of other critical functions. While both computer systems are triply redundant, the systems can safely operate the station with a single channel, or lane, in each computer.

Earlier this week, around the time the Atlantis astronauts were installing a new solar power truss, the terminal computer crashed. An automated reboot procedure was then executed to shut down and restart all three terminal computer lanes and all three central computer channels. The reboot procedure didn't work, however, and engineers have been struggling ever since to restore the computer system to normal operation.

After the power supply bypass surgery today, Russian flight controllers told their NASA counterparts lanes one and three were had been successfully repowered in the terminal computer, along with lanes two and three in the central computer. The systems then were shut down to close access panels and apparently restarted in self-test mode as planned. Controllers said they plan to operate the computers throughout the evening and to collect telemetry for additional analysis during passes over Russian ground sites early Saturday.

Earlier this afternoon, U.S. flight controllers told spacewalker James Reilly to disconnect a power cable in a newly installed solar array truss to help engineers determine whether the cable might have played a role inthe computer malfunctions earlier this week. The miscues began right around the time the cable was connected Monday.

But late today, astronaut Megan McArthur radioed the crew from Houston saying that might no longer be necessary.

"They did have good fortune over there on the computers," she said.

Spaceflight Now Plus
Additional coverage for subscribers:
VIDEO: SECOND SOLAR WING FULLY DEPLOYED PLAY
VIDEO: SECOND SOLAR WING DEPLOYED HALF-WAY PLAY
VIDEO: FIRST SOLAR WING FULLY DEPLOYED PLAY
VIDEO: FIRST SOLAR WING DEPLOYED HALF-WAY PLAY

VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 4 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: POST-SPACEWALK STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: BRIEFING ON MISSION EXTENSION PLANS PLAY

VIDEO: SPACEWALK No. 1 BEGINS PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF THE SPACEWALKS PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 3 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: SUNDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE CREW WELCOMED ABOARD STATION PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS DOCKS WITH THE SPACE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: WATCH THE RENDEZVOUS BACKFLIP MANUEVER PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: SATURDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: INSIDE MISSION CONTROL DURING LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: VIEW FROM COMPLEX 41 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD PERIMETER PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: THE VAB ROOF PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: THE PRESS SITE PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: UCS-23 TRACKER PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: PAD FRONT CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA AT THE BEACH PLAY

VIDEO: LAUNCH OF ATLANTIS! PLAY
VIDEO: FULL LENGTH MOVIE OF ASCENT TO ORBIT PLAY
VIDEO: EXTERNAL TANK ONBOARD VIDEO CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: POST-LAUNCH PRESS CONFERENCE PLAY

VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS DEPART QUARTERS FOR THE PAD PLAY
VIDEO: PAD'S ROTATING SERVICE STRUCTURE RETRACTED PLAY
VIDEO: HIGHLIGHTS FROM ATLANTIS' LAUNCH CAMPAIGN PLAY
VIDEO: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PAYLOAD'S LAUNCH CAMPAIGN PLAY

MORE: STS-117 VIDEO COVERAGE
SUBSCRIBE NOW



MISSION INDEX

INDEX | PLUS | NEWS ARCHIVE | LAUNCH SCHEDULE
ASTRONOMY NOW | STORE

ADVERTISE

© 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.